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funeral of the said esquire Tattle's first wife. The prisoner alleged in his defence, that he was going to buy stocks at the time when he met the prosecutor ; and that, during the story of the prosecutor, the said stocks rose abovę two per cent. to the great detriment of the prisoner. The prisoner further brought several witnesses to prove, that the said Jasper Tattle, esquire, was a most notorious storyteller ; that, before he met the prisoner, he had hindered one of the prisoner's acquaintance from the pursuit of his lawful business, with the account of his second marriage; and that he had detained another by the button of his coat, that

very morning, until he had heard several witty sayings and contrivances of the prosecutor's eldest son, who was a boy of about five years of age. Upon the whole matter, Mr. Bickerstaff dismissed the accusation as frivolous, and sentenced the prosecutor damages to the prisoner, for what the prisoner had lost by giving him so long and patient an hearing." He further reprimanded the prosecutor very severely, and told him, “ that if he proceeded in his usual manner to interrupt the business of mankind, he would set a fine upon him for every quarter of an hour's impertinence, and regulate the said fine according as the time of the person so injured should appear to be more or less precious."

Sir Paul Swash, knight, was indicted by Peter Double, gentleman, for not returning the bow which he received of the said Peter Double, on Wednesday the sixth instant, at the play-house in the Hay-market. The prisoner denied the receipt of any such bow, and alleged in his defence, that the prosecutor would oftentimes look full in his face, but that when he bowed to the said prosecutor, he would take no notice of it, or bow to somebody else that sat quite on the other side of

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him. He likewise alleged, that several ladies had complained of the prosecutor, who, after ogling them a quarter of an hour, upon their making a courtesy to him, would not return the civility of a bow. The Censor observing several glances of the prosecutor's eye, and perceiving that when he talked to the court he looked upon the jury, found reason to suspect there was a wrong cast in his sight, which, upon examination, proved true. The Cengor therefore ordered the prisoner, that he might not produce any more confusions in public assemblies, “ never to bow to any body whom he did not at the same time call to by name.”

Oliver Bluff and Benjamin Browbeat were indicted for going to fight a duel since the erection of “ The Court of Honour.” It appeared, that they were both taken up in the street as they passed by the court in their way to the fields behind Montague-bouse. The criminals would answer nothing for themselves, but that they were going to execute a challenge which had been made a week before the “ Court of Honour" was erected. The Censor finding some reason to suspect, by the sturdiness of their behaviour, that they were not so very brave as they would have the court believe them, ordered them both to be searched by the grand jury, who found a breast-plate upon the one, and two quires of paper upon the other. The breast-plate was immediately ordered to be hung upon a peg over Mr. Bickerstaff's tribunal, and the paper to be laid upon the table for the use of his clerk. He then ordered the criminals to button up their bosoms, and, if they pleased, proceed to their duel. Upon which they both went very quietly out of the court, and retired to their respective lodgings - The Court then adjourned until after the holidays." Copia vera.

CHARLES LILLIE.

N°266. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 21,1710.

Rideau et pulset lasciva decentiùs ætas.

HOR. 2 Ep. II. ult.
Let youth, more decent in their follies, scoff
The nauseous scene, and hiss thee reeling off.

FRANCIS.

From

my own Apartment, December 20. It would be a good appendix to “ The Art of Living and Dying,” if any one would write “ The Art of growing Old,” and teach men to resign their pretensions to the pleasures and gallantries of youth, in proportion to the alteration they find in themselves by the approach of age

and infirmities. The infirmities of this stage of life would be much fewer, if we did not affect those which attend the more vigorous and active part of our days; but instead of studying to be wiser, or being contented with our present follies, the ambition of many of us is also to be the same sort of fools we formerly have been. I have often argued, as I am a professed lover of women, that our sex grows old with a much worse grace than the other does; and have ever been of opinion, that there are more well-pleased old women than old men. I thought it a good reason for this, that the ambition of the fair sex being confined to advantageous marriages, or shining in the eyes of men, their parts were over sooner, and consequently the errors in the performance of them. The conversation of this evening has not convinced

him. He likewise alleged, that several ladies had complained of the prosecutor, who, after ogling them a quarter of an hour, upon their making å courtesy to him, would not return the civility of a bow. The Censor observing several glances of the prosecutor's eye, and perceiving that when he talked to the court he looked upon the jury, found reason to suspect there was a wrong cast in his sight, which, upon examination, proved true. The Censor therefore ordered the prisoner, that he might not produce any more confusions in public assemblies; “ never to bow to any body whom he did not at the same time call to by name."

Oliver Blutt and Benjamin Browbeat were indicted for going to fight a duel since the erection of • The Court of Honour." It appeared, that they were both taken up in the street as they passed by the court in their way to the fields behind Montague-bouse. The criminals would answer nothing for themselves, but that they were going to execute a challenge which had been made a weck before the “ Court of Honour" was erected. The Censor finding some reason to suspect, by the sturdiness of their behaviour, that they were not so very brave as they would have the court believe them, ordered them both to be searched by the grand jury, who found a brcast-plate upon the one, and iwo quires of paper upon the other. The breast-plate was immediately ordered to be hung upon a peg over Mr. Bickerstaf's tribunal, and the paper to be laid upon the table for the use of his clerk. He then ordered the criminals to button up their bosoms, and, if they pleased, proceed to their duel. Upon which they both went very quictly out of the court, and retired to their respective lodgings.-" The Court then adjourned until after the holidays." Copia vera.

CHARLES LILLIE.

N°266. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 21,1710.

Rideai et pulset lasciva decentiùs ætas,

HOR. 2 Ep. II. ult.
Let youth, more decent in their follies, scoff
The nauseous scene, and hiss thee reeling off.

FRANCIS.

From

ту own Apartment, December 20. It would be a good appendix to ~ The Art of Living and Dying,” if any one would write « The Art of growing Old,” and teach men to resign their pretensions to the pleasures and gallantries of youth, in proportion to the alteration they find in themselves by the approach of age and infirmities. The infirmities of this stage of life would be much fewer, if we did not affect those which attend the more vigorous and active part of our days; but instead of studying to be wiser, or being contented with our present follies, the ambition of many of us is also to be the same sort of fools we formerly have been. I have often argued, as I am a professed lover of women, that our sex grows old with a much worse grace than the other does; and have ever been of opinion, that there are more well-pleased old women than old men, I thought it a good reason for this, that the ambition of the fair sex being confined to advantageous marriages, or shining in the

of men, their parts were over sooner, and consequently the errors in the performance of them. The conversation of this evening has not convinced

eyes

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