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THE

MORAL CHARACTER

OF

CIVIL GOVERNMENT, ,

CONSIDERED WITH REFERENCE TO THE

POLITICAL INSTITUTIONS

OF

THE UNITED STATES,

IN FOUR LETTERS.

BY GILBERT MCMASTER, D. D.
PASTOR OF THE REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH,

DUANESBURGH, N. Y.

ALBANY: W. C. LITTLE.
SCHENECTADY: J. C. MAGOFFIN.

1832.

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ADVERTISEMENT.

The substance of the following Letters was, several years since, written and communicated to some individuals, who were engaged in the examination of the subject of which they treat. The writer has been persuaded to allow their appearance before the public. This has given occasion to the illustration of a few points somewhat farther than was deemed requisite in the original communications ; but without any change of the sentiments which they embraced. He has expressed his sentiments without reserve and, it is trusted, without giving occasion of offence to any.Against captious disputants no guards have been placed, for to such these communications were not made. While the author has not attempted to conceal his devotion to the

want Itnion of these States, he has been de

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occasion of eliciting motives to sound moral action on muu duwjuru ----er consideration, the writer will have gained his end in yielding to their publication.

Duanesburgh, March, 1882.

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ERRATA.–Page 39, line 18, for the, read these ; p. 52, 1. 11, for alledged, read alleged ; p. 60, 1. 33, for controvention, read contravention; p. 61, 1. 12, for restless, read reckless ; l. 24, for finally, read fairly ; p. 63, 1. 2, expunge the, before review; 1. 4, for continued, read construed; p. 65, 1. 5, for soundness, read sacredness ; 1. 11, for national, read natural ; 1. 14, for nation, read nature ; p. 66, 1. 15, expunge thereon ; p. 68, 1. 29, for present, read purest.

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PRINTED BY S. S. RIGGS,
No. 10 Union-Street, Schenectady.

ADVERTISEMENT.

The substance of the following Letters was, several years since, written and communicated to some individuals, who were engaged in the examination of the subject of which they treat. The writer has been persuaded to allow their appearance before the public. This has given occasion to the illustration of a few points somewhat farther than was deemed requisite in the original communications ; but without any change of the sentiments which they embraced. He has expressed his sentiments without reserve and, it is trusted, without giving occasion of offence to any.Against captious disputants no guards have been placed, for to such these communications were not made.

While the author has not attempted to conceal his devotion to the freedom, honour, and permanent Union of these States, he has been desirous of giving prominence to his firm conviction, that in order to the continuance of these there must be a progressive extension of moral influence through every department of the social fabric. That influence must flow from the enlightened recognition of the Redeemer and his religion by the citizens in every relation of life. This, instead of encroaching upon, will prove to be the most powerful safe guard of the national and civil rights of man. Should the following pages be, in any measure, the occasion of eliciting motives to sound moral action on the subject under consideration, the writer will have gained his end in yielding to their publication.

Duanesburgh, March, 1882.

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