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14 It is turned as clay to fashion, and all stand up as a garment.

17 Or hast thou seene the gates of the shadow of death :

21 Knowest thou it, because thou wast then borne ? and because the nomber of thy dayes is great ?

25 Who hath divided the spowtes for the raine ? or the way for the lightning of the thunders,

26 To cause it to rayne on the earth, &c.

31 Canst thou restraine the sweete influences of the Pleiades? or loose the bands of Orion ?

32 Canst thou bring forth Mazzaroth in their time ? canst thou also guide Arcturus with his sonnes ?

37 Who can number clouds by wisdome ? or who can cause to cease the bottels of heaven.

14 It is turned as clay to the seal ; and they stand as a garment.

17 Hast thou seen the doors of the shadow of death ?

21 Knowest thou it, because thou wast then born? or because the number of thy days is great ?

25 Who hath divided a water-course for the overflowing of waters ; or a way for the lightning of thunder ;

26 To cause it to rain on the earth, &c.

31 Canst thou bind the sweet influences of Pleiades, or loose the bands of Orion ?

32 Canst thou bring forth Mazzaroth in his season? or canst thou guide Arcturus with his sons ?

37 Who can number the clouds in wisdom? or who can stay the bottles of heaven.

CHAP. XXXIX. 5 Who hath set the wilde asse at libertye: or who hath loosed the bands of the wilde asse?

13 Hast thou given the pleasant wings unto the peacockes ? or wings and feathers unto the ostriche ?

19 Hast thou given the horse strength, or covered his necke with neying?

20 Hast thou made him afraid as the grasshopper? his strong neying is fearefull.

CHAP. XXXIX. 5 Who hath sent out the wild ass free? or who hath loosed the bands of the wild ass ?

13 Gavest thou the goodly wings unto the peacocks? or wings and feathers unto the ostrich ?

19 Hast thou given the horse strength ? hast thou clothed his neck with thunder ?

20 Canst thou make him afraid as a grasshopper? the glory of his nostrils is terrible.

JOHN ROGERS' TRANSLATION, 1537.

BISTOPS BIBLE. 1572 and 1957.),

CHAP, XL.

Chap. XL.

A Then spake the Lorde unto Job out of the storme and sayde:

B Cast them downe into the myre and cover their faces with darcknesse :

Beholde Behemoth (whom I made with thee) which eateth haye as an oxe: Lo, how strong is he in his loynes, and what power he hath in the navell of hys body. He spredeth out hys tayle like a cedre tre, all his vaynes are styf. His shynnes are lyke pypes of brasse, hys rygge bones are lyke staves of

yron.

c Fyrst when God made hym, he ordened the wyldernesse for hym, that the mountaynes shulde geve hym grasse, where all the beastes of the fylde take their pastyme. He lyeth amonge the redes in the mosses, the fennes hyde hym with their shadowe.

And the wylowes of the broke cover him round aboute.

6 Then aunsweared the Lorde unto Job out of the whirlewynde and sayde,

13 Hyde them in the dust togeather, and cover their faces in secrete :

15 Beholde the beast Behemoth, whom I made with thee, which eateth hay as an oxe :

16 Loe howe his strength is in his loynes, and what power he hath in the navil of hys body.

17 When hee will hee spreadeth out hys tayle lyke a cedar tree, all his sinowes are stiffe.

18 His bones are lyke pypes of brasse, yea hys bones are like steaves of iron.

19 He is the chiefe of the wayes of God, hee that made him will make his sword to approch unto him.

20 Surely the mountaynes bring him foorth grasse, where all the beastes of the field take their pastime.

21 He resteth him in the shade in the coverte of the reeds and fennes.

22 The trees cover him with their shadowe, and the wyllowes of the brooke compasse him about.

23 Beholde he drinketh up whole rivers, and feareth not, he thinketh that he can drawe up Jordane into his mouth.

24 He taketh it with his eyes, and yet the hunter putteth a brydle into his nose.

Lo! without any labour might he drincke out of the whoale floud and suppe of Jordane without any travayle. Who darre laye hande upon hym openly, and undertake to catch hym? Or, who darre put a hooke thorow his nose,

That thy companyons may hew hym in peces, be parted amonge the marchaunt men ? Čanst thou fyll the net with his skynne, or the fysh pannyer with his heade?

30 That thy companions may make a refection of him : or shall he be parted among the marchantes? Canst thou fyll the basket with his skinne? or the fishe pannier with his head ?

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6 His scales are as it were strong shieldes, so fastened togeather as if they were sealed :

9 His neesings make a glistering like fyre, and his eyes lyke the morning shyne.

10 Out of his mouth goe torches, and sparkes of fyre leape out.

i3 In his necke there remayneth strength, and nothing is too laborious for ym.

15 His hart is as harde as a stone, and as fast as the stithe that the smyth smyteth upon.

16 When hee goeth, the mightie are afrayde, and feare troubleth them.

21 Sharp stones are under him like potsheardes, and he lyeth upon sharp things as upon the soft myre.

His hert is as herde as a stone, and as fast as the stithye that the hammerinan smyteth upon. When he goeth : the myghtiest of all are afrayed, and the waves hevy.

D He treadeth the golde in the myre lyke the sharpe potsherdes,

CHAP. XLII.

Chap. XLII.

c Every man gave hym a shepe and a jewell of gold. And a M. asshes.

D The first called Daye: the seconde Poverte : the thyrde All-plenteousnes.

After this lyved Job xL yeares, so that he sawe his children and hys chyldrens children to the fourth generacyon. And so he dyed, beinge olde and of a perfecte age.

11 Every man also gave him a certayne sum of money, and a jewell of golde.

12 And a thousand shee asses:

14 The fyrst daughter called he Jemima, the second Kezia, and the third Kerenhapuch.

16 After this lyved Job an hundred and fortie yeeres : 80 that he sawe his children, and his childrens children, into the fourth generation,

17 And so Job dyed, being olde, and of a perfect age.

GENEVAN TRANSLATION, Edin.: Printed by ALEX, ABBITANOT. 1570

KING JAMES' OR PRESENT TRANSLATION

CHAP. XL.

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CHAP. XL. 6 Again the Lord answered Job out of the whirlewind and said,

13 Hide them in the dust together, and binde their faces in a secret place.

15 Behold now Behemoth (whom I made with thee) which eateth grasse as an oxe.

16 Behold now, his strength is in his loines, and his force is in the navill of his belly.

17 When he taketh pleasure, his tayle is like a cedar : the sinewes of his stones are wrapt together.

18 His bones are like staves of brasse, and his small bones like staves of yron.

19 He is the chiefe of the wayes of God: hee that made him will make his sword to approach unto him.

20 Surely the mountaines bring him forth grasse, where all the beastes of the field play.

21 Lieth he under the trees in the cover of the reede and fennes ?

22 Can the trees cover him with their shadow ? or can the willowes of the river compasse him about ?

23 Behold hee spoyleth the river, and hasteth not : hee trusteth that he can draw up Jorden into his mouth.

24 He taketh it with his eyes, and thrusteth his nose through whatsoever meeteth him.

6 Then answered the Lord unto Job out of the whirlwind, and said,

13 Hide them in the dust together, and bind their faces in secret.

15 Behold now Behemoth, which I made with thee ; he eateth grass as an ox.

16 Lo now his strength is in his loins, and his force is in navel of his belly.

17 He moveth his tail like a cedar: and the sinews of his stones are wrapped together. 18 His bones are as strong pieces of brass ;

his bones are like bars of iron.

19 He is the chief of the ways of God: he that made him can make his sword to approach unto him.

20 Surely the mountains bring him forth food, where all the beasts of the field play.

21 He lieth under the shady trees, in the cover of the reed, and fens.

22 The shady trees cover him with their shadow; the willows of the brook compass him about.

23 Behold, he drinketh up a river, and hasteth not: he trusteth that he can draw up Jordan into his mouth.

24 He taketh it with his eyes ; his nose pierceth through

snares.

25 Shal the companion banquet with him? Shall they divide him among the merchants ?

26 Canst thou fill the basket with his skinne, or the fishpanier with his head ?

CHAP. XLI. 6 The majestie of his scales is like strong shields, and are sure sealed.

9 His neisings make the light to shine and his eyes are like the eye-lids of the morning.

10 Out of his mouth goe lampes, and sparkes of fire leape out.

13 In his necke remaineth strength, and labour is rejected before his face.

15 His heart is as strong as a stone, and as hard as the nether milstone,

16 The mightie are afraid of his majestie, and for feare they faint in themselves.

21 Sharpe stones are under him, and hee spreadeth sharpe things upon the myre.

CHAP. XLI. 6 Shall thy companions make a banquet of him ? shall they part him among the merchants ?

Ý Canst thou fill his skin with barbed irons ? or his head with fish-spears. [The present version makes a different division of the fortieth and

forty-first chapters from the others.] 15 His scales are his pride, shut up together as with a close seal.

18 By his neesings a light doth shine, and his eyes are like the eyelids of the morning.

19 Out of his mouth go burning lamps, and sparks of fire leap out.

22 In his neck remaineth strength, and sorrow is turned into joy before him.

24 His heart is as firm as a stone ; yea, as hard as a piece of the nether millstone.

25 When he raiseth up himself, the mighty are afraid : by reason of breakings they purify themselves.

30 Sharp stones are under him: he spreadeth sharp-pointed things upon the mire.

CHAP. XLII. 11 Every man also gave him a piece of money, and every one an ear-ring of gold.

12 And a thousand she-asses.

14 And he called the name of the first, Jemima ; and the name of the second, Kezia ; and the name of the third, Keren-happuch.

16 After this lived Job an hundred and forty years, and saw his sons, and his son's sons, even four generations.

CHAP. XLII. 11 And every man gave him a piece of money, and every one an earering of gold.

12 And a thousand she asses.

14 And he called the name of one Jemimah, and the name of the second Keziah, and the name of the third Kerenhappuch. 16 And after this lived Job an hundreth and fortie

yeeres, and saw his sonnes, and his sonnes sonnes, even foure generations.

17 So Job died, being olde, and full of dayes.

17 So Job died, being old, and full of days.

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PSALME VI.
B For in death no man remembreth the,
My countenaunce is chaunged for very inwarde grefe.

PSALME VII. c God is a ryghtuous judge, and God is ever threatenynge.

PSALME VIII. A O Lorde oure governour :

After thou haddest for a season made him lower then the aungels, thou crownedest him with honour and glory.

PSALME IX. D O Lorde set a scolemaster over them, that the heithen maye knowe themselves to be but men.

PSALME X.
B His wayes are allwaye filthye,
He sytteth lurkyng in the gardens,

PSALM VI. 5 For in death no man remembreth thee: 7 My beautie is gone for verie trouble :

PSALM VII. 11 God is a righteous judge, strong and pacient : and God is provoked every day.

PSALM VIII. 1 O Lorde our governour,

5 Thou makest him lower than the angels : to crowne him with glorie and worship :

PSALM IX. 20 Put them in feare (O Lorde) that the heathen may know themselves to be but men.

Psalm X. 5 His wayes are alway greevous :

8 He sitteth lurking in the thievishe corners of the streetes :

Psalm XII. 9 The ungodly walke on every syde: when they are exalted, the children of men are put in rebuke.

PSALME XII. B And why? when vanyte and ydylnes getteth the overhande amonge the chyldren of men, all are full of the ungodly.

PsaLME XVI.
A My goodes are no thinge unto the.

B For why? thou shalt not leave my soule in hell, nether shalt thou suffre thy saincte to see corrupcyon.

PSALM XVI. 2 My goodes are nothing unto thee.

10 For why ? thou shalt not leave my soul in hell: neither shalt thou suffer thine holy one to see corruption.

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Psalm VI. 5 In the grave who shall praise thee? 7 Mine eye is dimmed for despite,

Psalm VII. 11 God judgeth the righteous, and him that contemneth God every day.

PSALM VIII. 1 O Lord our Lord,

5 For thou hast made him a little lower then God, and crowned him with glory and worship.

PSALM IX. 20 Put them in feare, O Lord, that the heathen may knowe that they are but men.

PSALM X. 5 His wayes alway prosper: 8 He lieth in waite in the villages ;

PSALM VI. 5 In the grave who shall give thee thanks ? 7 Mine eye is consumed, because of grief;

PSALM VII. 11 God judgeth the righteous, and God is angry with the wicked every day.

PSALM VIII. 1 O Lord our Lord,

5 For thou hast made him a little lower than the angels, and hast crowned him with glory and honour.

Psalm IX. 20 Put them in fear, O Lord; that the nations may know themselves to be but men.

Psalm X. 5 His ways are always grevious; 8 He sitteth in the lurking-places of the villages;

PSALM XII. 8 The wicked walke on every side : when they are exalted it is a shame for the sonnes of men.

PSALM XVI. 2 My wel-doing extendeth not to thee,

10 For thou wilt not leave my soule in the grave: neither wilt thou suffer thine holy one to see corruption.

Psalm XII. 8 The wicked walk on every side, when the vilest men are exalted.

Psalm XVI. 2 My goodness extendeth not to thee;

10 For thou wilt not leaye my soul in hell; neither wilt thou suffer thine Holy One to see corruption.

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