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.animating to such as have already made advances in it. The other part usually informs us of the course which the Christian soldier, already in good measure trained, has been led in following the Captain of his salvation; and as these journals are generally those of friends eminent for public services, this part has much to keep up our attention by its variety, and to excite our admiration by the magnitude of the services performed. Here too, sometimes, the depth of the baptism, and the strength of the Jtoly arm, which carries through it the humble and devoted servant of the Lord, are conspicuously detailed.

But this diary, though tending to the same purpose, the exaltation of the name of Christ, our Redeemer, and the encouragement of his humble followers (who, feeling no might of their own, are glad of the least touch of his assisting hand, and rejoice in ascribing to him all the praise), pursues a course sometimes varying from the journals whicii. have been hinted at. It is indeed that of a private, and with respect to the Society at large, even in England, almost an obscure individual, . It does not relate her religious exercises in youth; for it begins with her thirty-first year, and at a time when most who knew her would probably think her a fixed character on the side of religion, and one, whose foundations were already well laid on the rock. As it goes on, it relates little more than the regular attention towhat are called common and daily duties. And it is for this very reason, probably, adapted to the generality of readers in private life; if they be but such as think it iinportant to attend daily to the concerns of their immortal part; and to take, amidst the variety of scenes in which they are engaged, some time to consider whether their iabits, dispositions and practices are pleasing to God.

To those who neglect this important inquiry, what can be said; what can be written f

Some persons who take up this volume may think that the frequently repeated relations of experiences nearly sirnilar, are tedious to be read; but it may be doubted whether such critics will be found among the hungry souls, or the abased ones. These will probably recollect that, in like manner as the wants of the body recur from flit same existing cause, and are relieved by similar means; the general wants of the soul also, arising from the operation of causes which are long permanent, will continue to require a supply of the same remedies. These also will be likely to perceive that even in the sameness of the feelings of the writer, there is a life which not only prevents satiety, but which diffuses animation over her soliloquies: in which may be discovered the humble perseverance of a quickened mind, and abundant glimpses of the unfailing care of the Head of the church Over his suppliant servants.

There is one remarkable particular in this diary, at which it may be worth while a little to hint, namely the numerous instances, where good meetings are spoken of, meetings where truth was in dominion. Some will be likely to question the ability of the relator to judge of this; will confine these feelings to her own well prepared mind; and thus may discourage themselves from txpecting to find, in their retirements in spirit, what she found in her lowly waiting upon the Lord. It is certainly not east/ for one man to judge of the mental feelings, industry, or sloth, of another (and this on the other hand should always make us cautious of supposing that others do not feel the good which we feel J; nevertheless it is quite consistent wi^h our principles to believe that a sense may be given to the attentively waiting mind, of the spiritual situation of its companions. But be it even as such may be induced to suppose; is it not still a great encouragement to seek after that state of true hunger and thirst, which has a quick relish of the least degree of spiritual sustenance; and to bear with persevering patience those seasons of spiritual poverty, which excite us to seek aright? "Blessed are they who "hunger and thirst "after righteousness; for they shall be "filed." cf Blessed," (also, as the same evangelist relates our Lord to have said just before J" blessed are the poor in spirit, for "theirs is the kingdom of heaven."

Another prominent feature in the subsequent pages, is the frequency of the author's private retirements; which may possibly induce others to seek the same means of consolation and instruction, which seem to

have been singularly blessed to her. There is reason to believe that retirement is one mode pointed out by the good Shepherd, to wean tenderly visited persons from associates who would impede their advancement in the way of the cross; and to induce them to let their affections centre in spiritual gratifications, and permanent treasures: and much is it to be desired that such as at times feel the gentle attractions of heavenly love, thus "to sit alone, and keep silence," would yield to the salutary intimation. They would surely thus experience the Lord to be strength in weakness, a needful supply in want, a safe conductor in the path to salvation.

It is hoped that, among the various descriptions of readers into whose hands these sheets may fall, the newly-awakened may derive encouragement to yield up their wills in simple obedience to the requirings of the Lord, by observing how much is here exemplified that description of the ways of Wisdom, "Her ways are ways of pleasant. "ness, and all her paths are peace." And the deliverances from temptation, the consolations in affliction, and the support in trials

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