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up in it two rows of pillars, on which he caused to be choicely drawn the pictures of divers of the most famous Greek and Latin historians, poets, and orators: persuading them not to neglect rhetoric; because "Almighty God has left mankind affections to be wrought upon.” And he would often say, “ that none despised eloquence but such dull souls as were not capable of it.” He would also often make choice of some observations out of those historians and poets ; and would never leave the school without dropping some choice Greek or Latin apophthegm, or sentence, that might be worthy of a room in the memory of a, growing scholar.

Concerning Sir Henry Wotton's Epitaph, Izaak Walton relates : — He, waiving the common way, did think fit rather to preserve his name by a useful apophthegm, than by a large enumeration of his descent or merits; of both which he might justly have boasted: but he was content to forget them; and did choose only this prudent, pious sentence, to discover his disposition, and preserve his memory. It was directed by him to be thus inscribed :

HIC JACET HUJUS SENTENTIÆ PRIMUS AUTHOR,

“DISPUTANDI PRURITUS ECCLESIÆ SCABIES."

NOMEN ALIAS QUÆRE. *

* Thus Englished by Izaak Walton :

HERE LIES THE FIRST AUTHOR OF THIS SENTENCE,
"THE ITCH OF DISPUTATION WILL PROVE THE SCAB OF THE CHURCH."

INQUIRE HIS NAME ELSEWHERE

And, questionless, it will be charity, in all readers, to think his mind was then so fixed on heaven, that a holy zeal did transport him; and that, in this sacred ecstacy, his thoughts were then only of the Church triumphant, into which he daily expected his admission; and that Almighty God was then pleased to make him a prophet, to tell the Church militant, and particularly that part of it in this nation, where the weeds of controversy grow to be daily more numerous, and more destructive to humble piety; and where men have consciences that boggle at ceremonies, and yet scruple not to speak and act such sins as the ancient humble Christians believed to be a sin to think; and where, as our reverend Hooker says, “Former Simplicity, and Softness of Spirit is not now to be found; because Zeal hath drowned Charity; and Skill, Meekness.”

HYMN, COMPOSED BY SIR HENRY WOTTON,

IN HIS LAST SICKNESS.

O THOU Great Power, in whom I move,

For whom I live, to whom I die,
Behold me, through thy beams of love,

Whilst on this couch of tears I lie ;
And cleanse my sordid soul within,
By thy Christ's blood, the bath of sin ! -

No hallow'd oils, no grains I need,

No rags of saints, no purging fire; One rosy drop from David's Seed

Was worlds of seas to quench thine ire. O precious ransom! which once paid, That consummatum est was said ;And said by Him that said no more,

But seal'd it with his dying breath.Thou, then, that hast dispung’d my score,—

And dying wast the death of Death,
Be to me now, on Thee I call,
My life, my strength, my joy, my all!

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(FROM HIS EPISTLES. SIXTH DECADE : EPISTLE 1.)

TO MY LORD DENNY.

A PARTICULAR ACCOUNT HOW OUR DAYS ARE OR SHOULD

BE SPENT; BOTH COMMON AND HOLY. ; EVERY day is a little life; and our whole life is but a day, repeated : whence it is, that old Jacob numbers his life by days: and Moses desires to be taught this point of holy arithmetic, To number, not his years, but his days. Those, therefore, that dare lose a day, are dangerously prodigal; those that dare mis-spend it, desperate.

We can best teach others by ourselves. Let me tell your Lordship, how I would pass my days, whether common or sacred ; that you, or whosoever others overhearing me, may either approve my thriftiness, or correct my errors. To whom is the account of my hours, either more due, or more known ? · All days are His, who gave Time a beginning and continuance: yet some he hath made ours; not to command, but to use. In none may we forget Him; in some, we must forget all, besides Him. First, therefore, I desire to awake at those hours, not when I will, but when I must : — pleasure is not a fit rule for rest, but health. Neither do I consult so much with the sun, as mine own necessity; whether in body, or, in that, of the mind. If this vassal could well serve me waking, it should never sleep; but now, it must be pleased, that it may be serviceable.

Now, when sleep is rather driven away than leaves me, I would ever awake with God. My first thoughts are for Him, who hath made the night for rest, and the day for travel ; and, as he gives, so blesses both. If my heart be early seasoned with His presence, it will savour of him all day after.

While my body is dressing, not with an effeminate curiosity, nor yet with rude neglect, my mind addresses itself to her ensuing task; bethinking what is to be done, and in what order; and marshalling, as it may, my hours with my work.

That done, after some while meditation, I walk up to my masters and companions, my books; and, sitting down amongst them, with the best contentment, I dare not reach forth my hand to salute any of them, till I have first looked up to heaven ; and craved favour of Him, to whom all my studies are duly referred; without whom, I can neither profit, nor labour. After this, out of no over-great variety, I call forth those, which may best fit my occasions ; wherein, I am not too scrupulous of age. Sometimes, I put myself to school, to one of those ancients, whom the Church hath honoured with the name of

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