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ANALYTICAL TABLE OF CONTENTS

TO VOLUME II.

LECTURE XXV. (Third degree.)
Part I.—A GENERAL VIEW OF ALL THE ORDERS AND DEGREES OF MA-

SONRY WHICH WERE PRACTISED IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY.--Predi-
lection for the number Three, p. 3. Three Degrees of Masonry, 4.
Innovations, ib. The Sublime Degrees, ib. Royal Order of H. R.
D. M., account of the, 5. The Knights Hospitallers, 6. Freema-
sonry in the reign of Charles II., 7. New Degrees, 8. Ramsay's
Degrees, ib. Scotch Masonry, so called, 9. Female Lodges insti-

tuted, ib.
PART II.—MASONIC INNOVATIONS.—The Petit Elu, 10. Schisms in
Masonry, ib. The Supreme Tribunal, 11. The Rose Croix, ib.
Freemasonry prohibited, ib. Chapter of Clermont, ib. The Strict
Observance, 12. Emperor of the East and West, ib. King of Prus-
sia becomes the Grand Master of Continental Masonry, ib. The
Sublime Degrees introduced into the New World, 13. Zinnendorff*s
Masonry, ib. Hunde's Masonry, ib. Ecossais, or Scotch Masonry, 14.
The Grand Orient formed, ib. Knigge's Masonry, ib. The Hermetic
Masonry, ib.
Part III.-MASONIC SCHISMS.—Different systems in operation, 16.

Chevalier du Soleil, ib. The Mopses, ib. Lodges of Adoption, ib.
Le Mère Loge Ecossais, its system, ib. Cagliostro's Masonry, 17.
Order of Mizraim, ib. Illuminism founded, ib. Bahrdt's Masonry, 18.
Assembly at Wilhelmsbad, ib. Eclectic Masonry, ib. The Royal
Order of H. R D. M., 19. Rite Ancien et Accepté, ib. Prince of
the Royal Seciet, 20. Chapitre Metropolitain formed, ib. Andro-

gynal Masonry, ib.
Part IV.-The French Lodges, 21. The system in England, ib. ; in Scot

land, 22; in Ireland, ib. ; in Germany, and other Continental nations,
ib.; in America 23. Nomenclature of Masonry, ib. A hundred and
fifty Degrees enumerated ib.

LECTURE XXVI.
THE TRACING-BOARD OF THE THIRD DEGREE EXPLAINED.—Characteris.

tics of Masonry, 95. Emblems of mortality, 96 ; the coffin, ib.; the
sprig of cassia, 97. Traditions, ib. Emblems on the coffin explained,
98 Resurrection from the dead, ib. Fidelity, ib. Skull and bones, 99.

LECTURE XXVII.
LEGEND. TE THIRD DEGREE, WITH SOME CONJECTURES ON ITS PROBA-

BLE ORIGIN AND SYMBOLICAL REFERENCE.-The legend, 113. Union
of Speculative and Operative Masonry, 114. Origin of the legend,
ib. ; its meaning, ib. Abel, a type of the Messiah, 115. Types and
allegories, ib. Progressive character of the three Degrees, ib. A
type of the Christian dispensation, 116. The true design of Mason-
ry, ib.

LECTURE XXVIII.
THE NATURE AND DESIGN OF FREEMASONRY BEFORE THE FLOOD.-Practice

of morality, 127. History of the mountain of Moriah, ib. Freema-
sonry of the race of Seth, 128. Vision of Enoch, ib. ; his subterra
nean temple, 129. Wickedness of the antediluvian world, 130.
Enoch's pillars, ib.; his final exhortation, 131.

LECTURE XXIX.
WORLDLY POSSESSIONS.—Tubal Cain the inventor of certain arts, 141;

an artificer in brass, ib. Rude state of the first inbabitants of the
world, 142. The art of working in metals, ib. Worldly possessions,
how acquired, 143. Operative Masonry invented, ib. ; and the ine-
chanical arts, 144.

LECTURE XXX.
l'HE HOLY LODGE.—Deliverance of the children of Israel, 151. Battle
with the Amalekites, ib. Mount Sinai, 152. The tabernacle erected,
ib. The Holy Lodge opened, ib. Superstitions of the Israelites, 153.
The golden calf set up, 154. Ceremonies of its worship, ib. The
tabernacle described, 155. The Most Holy place, ib. Decorations of
the tabernacle, ib. A synıbol of the church of Christ, 156.

LECTURE XXXI.
THE TEMPLE OF SOLOMON AND THE SACRED LODGE.-Symbolical Ma-

sonry, 171. Model on which a Freemasons' Lodge is formed, 172.
Stones for building the temple carved, marked, and numbered, ib.
Rich decorations of the temple, ib. Resemblance between the temple
and a Masons' Lodge, 173. Wisdom, Strength, and Beauty, ib. Solo

mon classes the workmen, 174. Preparing the foundations, ib.
Discovery in the bowels of mount Calvary, ib. The Sacred Lodge
opened, 175.

· LECTURE XXXII.
THE DECORATIONS OF THE TEMPLE AND THE SOURCES OF KING SOLOMON's
WEALTH.—Ornaments of public buildings and of the temple, 185
Cost of the temple considered, 186. Solomon's riches exhaustless, ib.
The precious metals plentiful in the time of Solomon, 187. Wealth
of the Romans, 188; of Xerxes, ib. ; of the Persians, ib.; Rich deco-
rations of the temples of India, 189. Wealth unequally distributed,

ib.

LECTURE XXXIII.
The ARK OF THE COVENANT.—The ark described, 201 ; by whom made,

202. The propitiatory, ib. ; an emblem of peace and alliance, ib.; a
type of Christ, 203. Urim and Thummim, ib. The tabernacle and
its appendages, a type of a Masons' Lodge, ib. Pot of manna, 204.

LECTURE XXXIV. (The Royal Arch.)
ON THE INCREASE OF FREEMASONRY FROM ITS REVIVAL IN 1717.—Univer-

sality of the Order, 213. The Landmarks unalterable, ib. Masonic
schisms, ib. Ancient and modern Masonry, so called, union of, 214.
Spread of the science, 215. Number of Lodges and Brethren, ib.
Operation of the system in America, 216. Modification of the Con-
stitutions, ib. Seven classes of the Rite Ancien et Accepté, 217.
Names of the thirty-three degrees, ib. Auxiliary degrees, 218.

LECTURE XXXV.
'THE ROYAL Arch TRACING-BOARD.-Symbols on the Tracing-board, 243.

Its form, 244. Mosaic floor, ib. Double triangle, ib. Reference of
the luminaries, 245. Throne and canopy, ib. System in the United
States, ib. Second Tracing-board described, ib. Morality of the
Tracing-board, 246.

LECTURE XXXVI.
THE INEFFABLE DEGREES.—Decorations and appointments, 255. A.C-

count of a crime committed by some Tyrian workmen, ib. Chapter of
Intendants, 256. Establishment of the degree of the Nine Elected
Knights, ib. History of the degree of the Illustrious Elected of Fif.
teen, 257; and of the Sublime Knights elected, ib. Institution of
the degree of Illustrious Masters, and of the Priestly Orders, it. His.
tory of the degree of Intimate Secretary, 258. Solomon's apostacy,
ib. Elect and Perfect Masters, 259.

LECTURE XXXVII.
T'HE SACRED ROLL.-Symbolical Masonry, what it is, 271. The ten

tribes forsake Rehoboam, ib. Disobedience of the Jews, 272. The
sacred writings lost, ib. Josiah repairs the temple, 273. Hilkiah
finds the sacred roll, ib. Huldah conceals the copy, 274.

LECTURE XXXVIII.
THE CAPTIVITY IN BABYLON.—Nebuchadnezzar invades Judea, 281 ;

takes Jerusalem and destroys the temple, 282. The captives not con-
demned to slavery, ib. Some of the Jews distinguished at Babylon,
ib. Meet in schools or lodges, 283. Pythagoras instructed by Daniel,
ib. Introduces Jewish Masonry into Greece, ib.

LECTURE XXXIX.
THE GRAND AND ROYAL LODGE.—Grief of the captives in Babylon, 291.

Edict of Cyrus, ib. Some of the Jews demur, 292. Z. II. and J.
lead them from Babylon, ib. Grand Lodges in Chaldea, 293. The
Grand and Royal Lodge, ib. Construction of the Sanhedrim, ib.

LECTURE XL.
THE SECOND TEMPLE.—The Jews set up an altar, 303. The foundations
of the temple cleared, and a discovery made, ib. Footstone of the
temple laid, 304. Grief of the aged men, ib.. The Samaritans retard
the work, 305. Reign of Darius, ib. ; his decree, 306. The building
progresses, ib. The Grand and Royal Lodge opened, ib. Ezra visits
Jerusalem, ib. Nehemiah appointed governor of Judea, 307. Dedi-
Pation, ib.

LECTURE XLI.
The Burning Bush.—The Israelites in Egypt, 319. The Egyptians

afraid of them, ib. Moses preserved, 320. The Egyptian spurious
Freemasonry, ib. Moses flees to Midian, 321. The burning bush, ib.
Who it was that appeared in the fire, ib. Descent of the Deity, con-
sequences of the, 322, The day of judgment, ib.

LECTURE XLII.
THE FALL AND RESTORATION OF OUR FIRST PARENTS.—Adam and Eve

in Paradise, 333. Freemasonry of Adam, ib. Happiness in the Gar.
den of Eden, 334. Eve tempted, ib. ; and fell, ib. Our first parents hide
themselves, ib. Origin of signs, 335. Expulsion from Paradise, ib.
The Shekinah, ib. THE GREAT PROMISE, 336. Design of the tempter,
ib. The promise realized in Christ, ib. The serpent's head bruised,
ib. Advent of the Messiah, 337.

LECTURE XLIII.
THE PRIESTLY ORDERS.—Establishment of a priesthood, 353. The high
priest appointed, 354. His vestments, ib. ; their symbolical meaning,
ib. Stones in the Pectoral, 355; their reference, ib. Urim and
Thummim explained, 356 ; Symbolical reference of the, 357. The
high priest's mitre, ib. Virtue of the mysterious name of God, ib.
The atonement of Christ, ib.

LECTURE XLIV.
THE TETRAGRAMMATON.–First revelation of the Sacred Name, 375.

What the name was, ib. Ten names of the Deity, 376. Name not to
be profaned, ib. The right pronunciation of it lost, 377. The name
introduced into Freemasonry, 378. The Tetragrammaton performs
miracles, ib.; was Christ, ib.

LECTURE XLV.
THE CAMP OF ISRAEL.—History of the Israelites, 391. Occasions of

their dissatisfaction, 392; their complaints, ib. How marshalled in
the wilderness, 393. Their numbers, ib. ; and state of discipline, 394.
Arrangement of the camp, ib. The plague of serpents, 395. The
brazen serpent, ib. The prophecy of Balaam, ib. The types of a
better dispensation, 396.

LECTURE XLVI.
THE BANNERS OF THE TWELVE TRIBES.—Devices on the banners, 407.

Banners in the division of Judah, ib.; of Reuben, 408; of Ephraim,
ib.; and of Dan, 409. The destination of the tribe of Levi, ib.
Sustained in the wilderness by Jehovah, 410.

LECTURE XLVII.
The ROD OF MOSES.—The rod changed into a serpent, 417. Rods of
the magicians, ib. Conjectures on the obstinacy of Pharaoh, 418.
Science of Magic, ib. Punishment of the Egyptians, 419. Case of
the Egyptian ladies considered, 420. Agent of the plagues, ib. Gene-
ral use of the rod, or staff, throughout the world, ib. The royal
sceptre, ib. The Egyptians dismissed, 421.

LECTURE XLVIII.
THE TRIPLE TAU.-Signs of Masonry, 431. Use of the single cross,

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