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Poems in these Volumes. There is a numerous class of readers who imagine that the same words cannot be repeated without tautology : this is a great error : virtual tautology is much oftener produced by using different words when the meaning is exactly the same. Words, a Poet's words more particularly, ought to be weighed in the balance of feeling, and not measured by the space which they occupy upon paper. For the Reader cannot be too often reminded that Poetry is passion: it is the history or science of feelings : now every man must know that an attempt is rarely made to communicate impassioned feelings without something of an accompanying consciousness of the inadequateness of our own powers, or the deficiencies of language. During such efforts there will be a craving in the mind, and as long as it is unsatisfied the Speaker will cling to the same words, or words of the same character. There are also various other reasons why repetition and apparent tautology are frequently beauties of the highest kind. Among the chief of these reasons is the interest which the mind at. taches to words, not only as symbols of the passion, but as things, active and efficient, which are of themselves part of the passion. And further, from a spirit of fondness, exultation, and gratitude, the mind luxuriates in the repetition of words which appear successfully to communicate its feelings. The truth of these remarks might be shewn by innumerable passages from the Bible and from the impassioned poetry of every nation.

“Awake, awake Deborah : awake, awake, utter a song: Arise Barak, and lead thy captivity captive, thou Son of Abinoam. At her feet he bowed, he fell, he lay down : at her feet he bowed, he fell; where he bowed there he fell down dead. Why is his Chariot so long in coming? Why tarry the Wheels of his Chariot ?"-Judges, Chap. 5th. Verses' 12th, 27th, and part of 28th. - See also the whole of that tumultuous and wonderful Poem.

Note to the Poem ON REVISITING THE Wre, p. 191.I have not ventured to call this Poem an Ode; but it was written with a hope that in the transitions, and the impassioned music of the versification, would be found the principal requisites of that species of composition.

END OF VOL. I.

PRINTED BY BIGGS AND COTTLE, CRANE-COURT.

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