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above the world, is very likely to be despised by the world.

TAKE HEED, then, my Brother, that no one may have any reason to despise you; and that this church may never, like the church at Colosse, come under the obligation of that precept, Say to Archippus, TAKE NEED TO THE MINISTRY WHICH THOU HAST RECEIVED IN THE LORD THAT THOU FULFIL IT.* An apostolic injunction this, which, it is to be feared, attaches to many churches, re. specting their lukewarm and negligent pastors, Nay, who, that is daily lamenting over the plague of kis own heart ; that reflects on the state of religion in what is called the christian world ; that con: siders the ministerial work and the pastoral office, as being both sacred and important; and, finally, that demand of the Supreme Judge, Give an account of thy stewardship; can forbear to acknow, ļedge the propriety of Dr. Owen's pathetic lan, guage, when he says,: The Lord help men, and open their eyes before it be too late! For, either the Gospel is not true, or there are few who, in a due manner, discharge that ministry which they take upon them,'t

TAKE HEED, I once more charge you, TAKE NEED TO YOURSELF. This duty performed, you can şcarcely forbear tạking heed, either to the doctrine you preach, or to the flock over which the Holy Ghost uth made you an overseer, to feed the church of God, which he hath purchased with his own blood, AMỆN.

* Col. iv. 17, + Ou Epist. to the Hebrews, chap. vi. 11. vol. iii. p. 118. Folio.

COMMERCE

IN THE

HUMAN SPECIES,

AND THE

ENSLAVING OF INNOCENT PERSONS,

INIWICAL TO THE

Laws of Moses and the Gospel of Christ.

SERMON

PREACHED IN

LITTLE PRESCOT STREET, GOODMAN'S FIELDS,

January 29, 1792

BEHOLD THE TEARS OF SUCH AS WERE OPPRESSED, AND THEY HAD NO COMFORTER;
AND ON THE SIDE OF THEIR OPPRESSORS THERE WAS POWER; BUT THEY HAD NO
COMFORTER.

SOLOMON.
REMEMBER, HEAVEN HAS AN AVENGING ROD;
TO SMITE THE POOR IS TREASON AGAINST GOD.

COWPER.

COMMERCE

IN THE

HUMAN SPECIES,

fc. fc.

EXODUS XX1. 16.

He that stealeth a man and selleth him, or if he de · found in his hand, he shall surely be put to death.

To adore our Almighty Maker, to confide in the Lord Redeemer, and to exercise genuine benevolence toward all mankind, manifestly include both our duty and happiness in the present state. To the first we are bound as reasonable creatures ; to the second we are encouraged, by the gospel, as perishing sinners; and to the last we are obliged as social beings, surrounded with multitudes of our own species. To promote this worship of God our Creator, this confidence in Christ the Rer deemer, and this cordial affection for our neighbours, is the great end of an evangelical ministry, and of all divine institutions that are of a religious kind. For this end are we now assembled ; and to plead the cause of moral justice, of true benevolence, and of compassion, relative to the poor oppressed Africans, I have read that part of sacred writ which is now before us. Yes, my brethren, I now stand to bear a public testimony against that diversified iniquity which is inseparable from a coinmerce in the human species—that commerce which is called the Slave Trade, together with its numerous and horrid consequences.

That slavery against which I am going to plead is not of a civil or political kind, but entirely of a personal nature. For though it is much to be wished that liberty, in a civil and political sense, may be enjoyed and flourish, without licentiousness, in all the nations of the earth ; yet I never thought subjects of that nature proper to be discussed in the pulpit, and especially on the Lord's day. But the exercise of moral justice, of benevolence, and of humanity, being enforced by every. principle of evangelical truth; an endeavour to promote those virtuous affections toward our extremely degraded and oppressed fellow-creatures, the Negroes, must be completely consistent with the commands of divine law, the grace of the glorious gospel, and the solemnization of public worship.

It may be proper for me here to remark, that it is not against personal slavery, as absolutely, universally, and in every possible case, evil, that I am going to speak. By no means. For a man may so violate the laws and rights of society, as justly to forfeit his liberty; as to deserve slavery - slavery, in a strict and proper sense-that he may be an example to others, and compensate, as far as lies in his power, the injuries done to so. ciety by an abuse of his own liberty. Yet even in

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