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The following is the First Part of a Treatise on Practical Mathematics, and comprehends that portion which does not require the use of Tables. In adding another to the many existing Treatises on this subject, it may be proper to state the objects that have been kept in view in its composition. These have been, first, To exclude all useless matter, and thereby to keep the work within a small compass; secondly, To make it as entirely demonstrative as possible, without reference to any other work on Mathematics. For this purpose, as well as for its own intrinsic usefulness, a Treatise on Geometry is introduced, in which, by adopting a different order of the propositions from that used in Euclid's Elements, and using symbols for certain expressions of frequent occurrence, an unprecedentedly large quantity of geometrical truths is presented, without in any instance detracting from the fulness of the demonstrations, which are always given at length.

The article on Algebra, it is hoped, will be found to be sufficiently extensive for most practical purposes; and the pupil that has thoroughly studied it, will find himself well prepared for entering on the study of larger works. In many instances exercises have been introduced of such a nature, as not only to illustrate the rules, but to assist in reducing certain

PREFACE.

The following is the First Part of a Treatise on Practical Mathematics, and comprehends that portion which does not require the use of Tables. In adding another to the many existing Treatises on this subject, it may be proper to state the objects that have been kept in view in its composition. These have been, first, To exclude all useless matter, and thereby to keep the work within a small compass; secondly, To make it as entirely demonstrative as possible, without reference to any other work on Mathematics. For this purpose, as well as for its own intrinsic usefulness, a Treatise on Geometry is introduced, in which, by adopting a different order of the propositions from that used in Euclid's Elements, and using symbols for certain expressions of frequent occurrence, an unprecedentedly large quantity of geometrical truths is presented, without in any instance detracting from the fulness of the demonstrations, which are always given at length.

The article on Algebra, it is hoped, will be found to be sufficiently extensive for most practical purposes; and the pupil that has thoroughly studied it, will find himself well prepared for entering on the study of larger works. In many instances exercises have been introduced of such a nature, as not only to illustrate the rules, but to assist in reducing certain

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