The Complete Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson: Lectures and biographical sketches

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Houghton Mifflin, 1904

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Contenido

I
1
II
29
III
67
IV
89
V
122
VI
161
VII
181
VIII
215
XI
291
XII
322
XIII
371
XIV
379
XV
397
XVI
433
XVII
448
XVIII
487

IX
239
X
259
XIX
499

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Página 95 - But for those first affections, Those shadowy recollections, Which, be they what they may, Are yet the fountain light of all our day, Are yet a master light of all our seeing; Uphold us, cherish, and have power to make Our noisy years seem moments in the being Of the eternal Silence: truths that wake, To perish never...
Página 482 - The youth gets together his materials to build a bridge to the moon, or, perchance, a palace or temple on the earth, and, at length the middle-aged man concludes to build a wood-shed with them.
Página 471 - His interest in the flower or the bird lay very deep in his mind, was connected with Nature — and the meaning of Nature was never attempted to be defined by him. He would not offer a memoir of his observations to the Natural History Society. "Why should I? To detach the description from its connections in my mind would make it no longer true or valuable to me: and they do not wish what belongs to it.
Página 521 - So nigh is grandeur to our dust, So near is God to man, When Duty whispers low, Thou must, The youth replies, I can...
Página 455 - They make their pride," he said, "in making their dinner cost much; I make my pride in making my dinner cost little." When asked at table what dish he preferred, he answered, "The nearest.
Página 611 - Folk say, a wizard to a northern king, At Christmas-tide such wondrous things did show, That through one window men beheld the spring, And through another saw the summer glow, And through a third the fruited vines arow, While still, unheard, but in its wonted way, Piped the drear wind of that December day.
Página 477 - I hearing get, who had but ears, And sight, who had but eyes before ; I moments live, who lived but years, And truth discern, who knew but learning's lore.
Página 471 - ... His power of observation seemed to indicate additional senses. He saw as with microscope, heard as with ear-trumpet, and his memory was a photographic register of all he saw and heard. And yet none knew better than he that it is not the fact that imports, but the impression or effect of the fact on your mind. Every fact lay in glory in his mind, a type of the order and beauty of the whole.
Página 96 - T is man's perdition to be safe, When for the truth he ought to die." Such is the difference of the action of the heart within and of the senses without. One is enthusiasm, and the other more or less amounts of horsepower. Devout men, in the endeavor to express their convictions, have used different images to suggest this latent force; as, the light, the seed, the...
Página 610 - teachers' meeting ' last night my good , after disclaiming any wish to difference Jesus from a human mind, suddenly seemed to alter his tone and said that Jesus made the world and was the Eternal God. Henry Thoreau merely remarked that ' Mr. had kicked the pail over.' I delight much in my young friend, who seems to have as free and erect a mind as any I have ever met.

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