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141.

-I have known
The dumb men throng to see him, and the blind
To hear him speak : the matrons flung their gloves,
Ladies and maids their scarfs and handkerchiefs,
Upon him as he passed : the nobles bended,
As to Jove's statue; and the commons made
A shower and thunder with their caps and shouts :

I never saw the like.
Coriolanus-Act 2, Sc. 1.

SHAKSPEARE.
An INFANT.

142. There is a fire-fly in the southern clime

That shineth only when upon the wing ;
So is it with the mind : when once we rest,

We darken.
Festus.

BAILEY.

143. Manners with fortunes, tempers change with climes,

Tenets with books, and principles with times. Moral Essays.

POPE.

144.

-Yield not thy neck
To fortune's yoke, but let thy dauntless mind

Still ride in triumph over all mischance.
King Henry 6th, Third Part— Act 3, Sc. 3. SAAKSPEARE.

A GNOME ora MUMMY.

145.

-An angel drives the furious blast ;
And, pleased th' Almighty's orders to perform,

Rides in the whirlwind, and directs the storm.
The Campaign.

ADDISON.

146. Law is law; law is law; and as in such, and so forth, and

hereby, and aforesaid, provided, always, nevertheless, notwithstanding.

STEVENS.

147. When Athens' armies fell at Syracuse,

And fetter'd thousands bore the yoke of war,
Redemption rose up in the Attic Muse,
Her voice their only ransom from afar :
See as they chant the tragic hymn, the car
Of the o'ermaster'd victor stops, the reins
Fall from his hands-his idle scimitar

Starts from its belt-he rends his captive's chains,
And bids him thank the bard for freedom and his strains.
Childe Harold-Canto 4, Stanza 16.

BYRON. A RED Show.

148. -For aught that ever I could read,

Could ever hear by tale or history,

The course of true love never did run smooth. Midsummer Night's Dream— Act 1, Sc. 1. SHAKSPEARE.

GOOD-DAY.

149. Through tattered clothes small vices do appear ;

Robes, and furred gowns, hide all. Plate sin with gold,
And the strong lance of justice hurtless breaks :

Arm it in rags, a pigmy's straw doth pierce it.
King Lear-Act 4, Sc. 6.

SHAKSPEARE. MERRY and Rich.

150. Whate'er your forte, to that your

zeal confine,
Let all your efforts there concentred shine ;
As shallow streams collected form a tide,
So talents thrive to one grand point applied.
A jealous mistress is the Muse of Art,
And scorns to share the homage of your heart;
Demands continual tribute to her charms,
And takes no truant suitor to her arms.

EPES SARGENT.

151. Violent fires soon burn out themselves. King Richard 2nd— Act 2, Sc. 1.

HoT CANDY.

SHAKSPEARE.

152. The thorns which I have reaped are of the tree

1 planted,—they have torn me,-and I bleed :
I should have known what fruit would spring from such a seed.
Childe Harold-Canto 4, Stanza 10.

BYRON.
Roads.

153. Night's candles are burnt out, and jocund day

Stands tiptoe on the misty mountain tops.
Romeo and Juliet-Act 3, Sc. 5.

SHAKSPEARE.
A HOMELY MILL.

154. No wrestling winds nor blustering storms

Mid Autumn's pleasant weather ;
The moorcock springs on whirring wings,

Amang the blooming heather :
Now waving grain, wide o'er the plain,

Delights the weary farmer;
And the moon shines bright, when I rove at night

To muse upon my charmer.

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155. The only amaranthine flower on earth

Is Virtue; the only lasting treasure, Truth. The Task.

CowPER.

156. Recompense to no man evil for evil. Provide things honest

in the sight of all men. Romans-Ch. 12, Ver. 17.

BIBLE.
Right or NOTHING.

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157.

-The honest man,
Simple of heart, prefers inglorious want

To ill-got wealth.
Cider-A Poem.

J. PHILLIPS.

158. What a piece of work is man! How noblo in reason !

how infinite in faculties! in form, and moving, how express and admirable ! in action, how like an angel ! in apprehension, how like a god! the beauty of the

world! the paragon of animals ! Hamlet-Act 2, Sc. 2.

SHAKSPEARE. Known.

159. Sweet Memory! wafted by thy gentle gale,

Oft up the stream of time I turn my sail
To view the fairy haunts of long-lost hours,

Blessed with far greener shades, far fresher bowers.
The Pleasures of Memory.

ROGERS.

160. Knowledge and Wisdom, far from being one,

Have oft-times no counection. Knowledge dwells
In heads replete with thoughts of other inen ;
Wisdom in minds attentive to their own.
Knowledge is proud that he has learned so much,

Wisdom is humble that he knows no more.
The Task.

CowPER.

161. I'll put a girdle round about the earth

In forty minutes.
Midsummer Night's Dream-Act 2, Sc. 2. SHAKSPEARE.

A CANNON.

162. Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some

have greatness thrown upon them. Twelfth Night-Act 5, Sc. 1.

SHAKSPEARE. ROYALTY:

163. The tear down childhood's cheek that flows,

Is like the dew-drop on the rose ;
When next the summer breeze comes by,

And waves the bush, the flower is dry.
Rokeby.

Scott.

164.

-Our doubts are traitors,
And make us lose the good we oft might win,

By fearing to atteinpt.
Measure for Measure-Act 1, Sc. 5. SHAKSPEARE.

LITTLE.

165. Costly apparatus and splendid cabinets, have no magical

power to make scholars. In all circumstances, as man is, under God, the master of his own fortune, so is he the maker of his own mind. The Creator has so constituted the human intellect, that it can grow only by its own action, and by its own action it most certainly and necessarily grows. Every man must therefore in an inportant sense, educate himself. His books and teachers are but helps : the work is his. A man is not educated until he has the ability to summon, in case of emergency, all his mental power in vigorous exercise to effect his proposed object. It is not the man who has seen most, or who has read most, who can do this. Nor is it the man that can boast merely of native vigor and capacity. The greatest of all the warriors that went to the siego of Troy, had not the pre-eminence because nature had given him strength, and he carried the longest bow, but because self-discipline had taught him how to bend it.

DANIEL WEBSTER.

106. Good things should be praised. Two Gent. of Verona-Act 3, Sc. 1.

HONEY-MOUTH.

SHAKSPEARE.

167. And still they gazed, and still the wonder grow,

That one small head should carry all he know. The Deserted Village.

GOLDSMITH.

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