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Disparked my parks, and felled my forest woods ;
From my own windows torn my household coat,
Razed out my impress, leaving me no sign, -
Save men's opinions, and my living blood,

To show the world I am a gentleman.
King Richard 2nd— Act 3, Sc. 1.

SHAKSPEARE A WITTY COMEDY.

195. Delay leads impotent and snail-paced beggary :

Then fiery expedition be my wing. King Richard 3rdAct 4, Sc. 3.

SHAKSPEARE. A NARROW ROOM.

196. I shall be loved when I am lacked. Coriolanus-Act 4, Sc. 1.

A NEW FORT.

SHAKSPEARE.

197.

-Their love
Lies in their purses; and whoso empties them,

By so much fills their hearts with deadly hate.
King Richard 2nd-Act 2, Sc. 2.

SHAKSPEARE A WEIGHTY CANNON.

198. We should be pleased that things are so,

Who do for nothing see the show. The Spleen.

GREEK

199. Within this awful volume lies

The mystery of mysteries,-
Happiest they of human race,
To whom their God has given grace
To read, to hear, to hope, to pray,
To lift the latch-to force the way ;
And better they had ne'er been born,

Than read to doubt or read to scorn.
Written in the blank leaf of a Bible.

BYRON.

200. My task is done my song hath ceased theme

Has died into an echo; it is fit
The spell should break of this profrached dream.
The torch shall be extinguish d which hath lit
My midnight lamp—and what is writ, is writ-
Would it were worthier ! but I am not now
That which I have been—and my visions llit

Less palpably before me and the glow
Which in my spirit dwelt, is fluttering, faint, and low.

Farewell ! a word that must be, and hath been
A sound which makes us linger ;--yet--farewell!
Ye! who have traced the Pilgrim to the scene
Which is his last, if in your memories dwell
A thought which once was his, if on yo swell
A single recollection, 'not in vain
He wore his sandal-shoon, and scallop-shell;

Farewell! with him alone may rest the pain,
If such there were-with you, the moral of his strain.
Childe Harold-Canto 4, Stanza 185.

BYRON,
ARTTUL

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Order of Shakspeare's Plays. 1. The Tempest, 2. Two Gentlemen of Verona, 3. Merry Wives of Windsor, 4. Twelfth Night, or What you Will, 5. Measure for Measure, 6. Much Ado about Nothing, 7. Midsummer Night's Dream, 8. Love's Labor's Lost, 9. Merchant of Venice, 10. As You Like It, 11. All's Well that ends Well, 12. Taming of the Shrew, 13. Winter's Tale, 14. Comedy of Errors, 15. Macbeth, 16. King John, 17. King Richard Second 18. King Henry Fourth-First Part, 19. King Henry Fourth-Second Part, 20. King Henry Fifth, 21. King Henry Sixth-First Part, 22. King Henry Sixth--Second Part, 23. King Henry Sixth-Third Part, 24. King Richard Third, 25. King Henry Eighth, 26. Troilus and Cressida, 27. Timon of Athens, 28. Coriolanus, 29. Julius Cæsar, 30. Antony and Cleopatra, 31. Cymbeline, 32. Titus Andronicus, 33. Pericles, Prince of Tyre, 34. King Lear, 35. Romeo and Juliet, 36. Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, 37. Othello, Moor of Venice,

Hat.
Honey.
Home.
Harrow.
Hill.
Hedge.
Hawk,
Ivy.
Abbey.
Woods.
Date.
Den.
Dome,
Deer.
Doll.
Ditch.
Dike.
Dove.
Deep.
Noose.
Night.
Noon.
Gnome.
Norway.
Nile.
Niche.
Nag.
Knife.
Knob,
Mouse.
Meadow.
Moon,
Mummy
Moor.
Mill.
Mush.
Mug.

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GEEHALE-AN INDIAN LAMENT.

BY HENRY R. SCHOOLCRAFT.

1. The blackbird is singing on Michigan's shore, 2. As sweetly and gayly as ever before; 3. For he knows to his mate he at pleasure can hie, 4. And the dear little brood she is teaching to fly. 5. The sun looks as ruddy, and rises as bright, 6. And reflects o'er the mountains as beamy a light, 7. As it ever reflected, or ever expressed, 8. When my skies were the bluest, my dreams were the best. 9. The fox and the panther, both beasts of the night, 10. Retire to their dens on the gleaming of light, 11. And they spring with a free and a sorrowless track, 12. For they know that their mates are expecting them back 13. Each bird and each beast, it is blest in degree : 14. All nature is cheerful, all happy, but me. 15. I will go to my tent, and lie down in despair; 16. I will paint me with black, and will sever my hair ; 17. I will sit on the shore where the hurricane blows, 18. And reveal to the god of the tempest my woes ; 19. I will weep for a season, on bitterness fed, 20. For

my

kindred are gone to the hills of the dead:

21. But they died not by hunger, or lingering decay; 22. The steel of the white man hath swept

them

away. 23. This snake-skin, that once I so sacredly wore, 24. I will toss, with disdain, to the storm-beaten shore; 25. Its charms I no longer obey or invoke, 26. Its spirit hath left me, its spell is now broke. 27. I will raise up my voice to the source of the light; 28. I will dream on the wings of the bluebird at night; 29. I will speak to the spirits that whisper in leaves, 30. And that minister balm to the bosom that grieves ; 31. And will take a new Manito—such as shall seem 32. To be kind and propitious in every dream. . 33. O, then I shall banish these cankering sighs, 34. And tears shall no longer gush salt from my eyes ; 35. I shall wash from

my

cloud-colored stain ; 36. Red-red shall alone on my visage remain ! 37. I will dig up my hatchet, and bend my oak bow; 38. By night and by day, I will follow the foe; 39. Nor lakes shall impede me, nor mountains, nor snows; 40. His blood can alone give my spirit repose. 41. They came to my cabin when heaven was black; 42. I heard not their coming, I knew not their track; 43. But I saw, by the light of their blazing fuzees, 44. They were people engender'd beyond the big seas. 45. My wife and

my
children-0

spare me the tale! 46. For who is there left that is kin to GEEHALE?

face every

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