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The quotation made from Augustine cannot so much as seem contrary to the tenets of Calvinists; except as Calvinists are supposed to neglect warning men against perverting the gospel into an encouragement to sin : so that I hope I may be allowed to adduce these quotations from books published many years ago, for the purpose of shewing that we do not fail to caution men in this respect, as earnestly as any of the ancient fathers. I trust the reader will excuse me for taking them from my own writings; which I could do with less expense of time than from those of my brethren: and I am confident that the evangelical clergy in general will approve these warnings, and, as far as our argument is concerned, be willing that they should be considered as their own. --That this their regard to holy practice, even “ abounding in every good work,” is not only “in “ word and in tongue, but in deed and in truth ; " the appeal may safely be made to the public at large.. .

[There is scarcely an expression in the whole passage from Augustine, to be found in the 'Re* futation,' p. 439 to p. 442, that Calvinists would object to.-Become worthy of that habitation' is not language generally current among them : but, as it is not wholly unscriptural,' it only needs a proper interpretation.-- To those only who lead 'good lives ;' that is, who shew their faith by their good works.The reader of quotations to this effect, adduced as directly opposed to the * tenets of Calvinism,' unless he is conversant with the argument, will of course be led to think,

'Matt. x. 37. Luke xx. 35. Rev. iii. 4.

glorify his own faithfulness. He had received Isaac from God, who had a right to dispose of him: honour and comfort were in this path; and, though untried before, with undaunted constancy he walked in it.-Hear this, ye inattentive objectors, who traduce the doctrine of salvation by faith as inimical to practical godliness. Go, and upon your principles equal or exceed this obedience: till then be dumb; or allow that, though you understand it not, this apparently "weak principle produces effects beyond compa

rison prodigious. But hear this likewise, ye abusers of this most holy faith, whose conduct merits still deeper indignation ; who “say you have faith," yet cleave to your sins, renounce 'not the world, deny not yourselves, refuse the

cross, are lovers of yourselves, of pleasure, of money, more than lovers of God; and, instead of parting with a deservedly beloved Isaac at God's command, like Judas, kiss Christ, and sell him for a few pieces of silver, or some vile sensual gratification! Here then compare your faith with Abraham's, and acknowledge that you are no genuine sons of this father of the faithful; but that your faith is dead, your hope presumptuous, and that Abraham disowns and is ashamed of you. In plain language, nothing but faith will carry a man through with unreserved obedience in every possible trial; and that is no

true faith which perseveres in refusing to obey a • plain commandment, in any case whatever. “Ye are my friends, if ye do whatsoever I command

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| Practical Observations on Gen. xxii. Comment on Bible, 1788. * Matt. x. 37. Luke xx. 35. Rev. Üï. 4.

The quotation made from Augustine cannot so much as seem contrary to the tenets of Calvinists; except as Calvinists are supposed to neglect warning men against perverting the gospel into an encouragement to sin: so that I hope I may be allowed to adduce these quotations from books published many years ago, for the purpose of shewing that we do not fail to caution men in this respect, as earnestly as any of the ancient fathers. I trust the reader will excuse me for taking them from my own writings; which I could do with less expense of time than from those of my brethren: and I am confident that the evangelical clergy in general will approve these warnings, and, as far as our argument is concerned, be willing that they should be considered as their own. --That this their regard to holy practice, even “ abounding in every good work,” is not only “in “ word and in tongue, but in deed and in truth ;" the appeal may safely be made to the public at large. ..

There is scarcely an expression in the whole passage from Augustine, to be found in the 'Re* futation,' p. 439 to p. 442, that Calvinists would object to.-Become worthy of that habitation' is not language generally current among them : but, as it is not wholly unscriptural, it only needs a proper interpretation. To those only who lead “good lives ;' that is, who shew their faith by their good works. The reader of quotations to this effect, adduced as directly opposed to the * tenets of Calvinism,' unless he is conversant with the argument, will of course be led to think, Surely there must be something very abominable in the sentiments of the Calvinists, which it was not proper expressly to mention! Even the passages adduced as directly against them so ascribe every thing good to the grace of God, and leave man so completely without any thing of our own to rely on, or boast of, that we cannot cordially receive them; what then must Calvinism itself be? But “ be it known unto you, men and bre“thren,” that these quotations are more prominently Calvinistic by far, than our sermons in general are; or our publications, except as special occasions sometimes call us to be more explicit in stating our sentiments, to guard against misrepresentation and misapprehension : that all we object to in them, even in controversy, is merely inaccuracy of expression, inconsistent with the writer's own words in other places, as well as with our sentiments: and that, where men approach so near our views as these quotations do, provided their lives be consistent, we give them most cordially the right hand of fellowship, as brethren and fellow-labourers; nay, we do this without reserve to many who are still further from accuracy in either reasoning or speaking on these subjects, but who “walk circumspectly,” (or “ac“ curately,” expibüsas professing “ repentance “ towards God, and faith towards our Lord Jesus “ Christ.” Indeed no small proportion of the evangelical clergy would object to many expressions in Augustine, as too much approximating to Calvinism. Yet they are cordially received by

their brethren, “but not to doubtful disputations." · It would really surprise those, who imagine that

our chief earnestness is about the high points of Calvinism, to be present, incog. in the company of a select number of the evangelical clergy, who are aware that, on this doctrine of personal election and final perseverance they differ from each other; to observe that, in a conversation wholly on some select religious subject, intimately connected, as they suppose, with their ministerial usefulness, and continued during two or three hours; these subjects are never once mentioned, and often not hinted at. Nay, I verily believe that, in the earnestness of the inquiry, how they may best make progress in personal religion, and in doing good to their congregations, these points scarcely occur to the thought of any present. If, however, any thing be brought forward respecting them ; it generally passes off by some one saying, 'We know each other's sentiments on that point; and agree to differ amicably: dismiss the subject.'

-Thus we often meet, and converse, and pray together; and part more cordially united than before, even though we must think each other mistaken on this point. But we are agreed in so many other matters of prime and essential importance, that, unless we are called on to deliver our sentiments on these doctrines, we seldom mention them. This, I apprehend, is very different from what is generally supposed: but I can confidently affirm that it is commonly the case with the evangelical clergy, when they meet together. ...... In general, I should consider a modern writer as being as much a Calvinist as I desire any one to be, who should write in the usual language of Augustine.]

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