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Farnafius and Helicon
59 Select Sentences

575
Pear trees, method to prevent Senfibility

227
from blasting

394 Sewall, Stephen, Esq., death of 430
Penn, William, biography of 458 Shakers, some account of the 585
Piety, honesty and beneficence 395 Sincerity, remarks on

247
Places of Worship in London 528 Soldiers, a British tale, 946, 397, 439,
Poetry influenced by christian virtue 80

501, 547, 600, 647
Pocahontas, a ketch of the life of 170 Speech of Gov. Strong, June, 1804 379
Poetry of the higher kind, on 62

Nov. 1804 622
Powder for extinguishing fire 288 Stevens, Rev. Josiah, death of 480
Prcfident's Meflage, Nov. 1804 619 Stone, Gen. John Hoskins, death of 572
Priestley, Dr. sketch of the life of 472, Student of natural Philosophy, No. I. 483

521, 569

No. II. 535-No. III. 649
Prevalent Diseases in Boston, state Studiofus to Alcander, letter from 248
ment of, for Sept. 527-Oct. 624 Suicide

668
Nov. ib.-Dec. 671.

Sumner, C. P. letter from

531
Probity

574

T
Price, extract from
456 Taste, on

435
Proceedings of Humane Society S83 Theologist, No. I. 537-No. II. 627
Puerile humanity, appeal to

200

Thermometer, state of, for May,
R

996-June, 384-July, 131---
Refinement of manners, on

387 Aug. 480--Sept. 482-04. 530
Reformed College Rake, bift. of a 209 - Nov. 578-Dec. 626.
Restorator, No. 1. 402-No. I. 452 Thou art a critick!

298
No. III. 499 Thursday Lectare, No. I. 546_No. II.
S

599-No. III. 636
Schuyler, Gen. Philip, death of 669

W
Sect of the Stoicks, view of the 199 Washington, the mausoleum of 243
Seed's Sermons, bilhop Hildefley's Willard, Joseph, D. D. death of 523
character of

405 Woodward, Hon. Bezaleel, death of 524

37
327

602

POETRY
Address to Sleep

229 Inscription over a clear spring 932
Advice to young ladies

374 Lady that loved dancing, lines to 276
Anniversary ode for the Maflacha Love Song, adapted to modern times 40

setts Charitable Fire Society 375 Love and Friendship, difference be-
Anniversary election ode, by T. G.

tween

471
Fessenden
550 Lover's Dream, by D'Ifraeli

426
Anstey's ode to Jenner, latin 371

Melancholy

328
-translation 372 Mufing on the scenes of spring 284
Alia, an elegy

132 Musicians, the
Autumn

Nightingale, the
Bathing

549, 602 Nil defperandum, or a song of Wo 130
Battle of Copenhagen

650 Nightingale and Glow-worm 427
Church Porch 505, 551,604, 653 Ode to Morning

327
Contentment, a song
374 to Sensibility

ib.
Coultier's address to his book 38 on the close of Autumn

36
Cupid run away

506 -deplorans mortem Alexandri
Death of Milcena, on the
329 Hamilton

603
Death of Politian, lines on the 472 for Salem Female Charitable
Elegy

129 Society, by J. Story, Esq. 426
Elegy on the death of a young friend 231 -for American Independence,
E pistolary verses
131 by Winthrop Sargent

424
Fancy, to

133 by Williain Bigelow, A. M. 425
Flora, on the approach of Cupid 194

-by a young lady, for Mafía-
Friend, lines to a

39 chusetts Charitable Fire Society 376
Gilimer
86 Psalm xlii. 14, 15, paraphrased

328
Iscription on the tomb of T. Cave 143 Psalm 8th paraphraseck

Pralm 100th paraphrased

551 Song, a
Purity of thought

230 Tale, a ; or what you will 182
Pursuit of happiness 279,325 Tappan, David, D.D. on the death of 181
Reanimation

377

Truth and the Miller, a fable 328
Rural Scene
870, 424 Vagrant, the

33
Spirit of the vital flame, by R. T. Verses by Pasquin

88
Paine, jr. Esq.
376 Verses, inscribed to a friend

83
Street was a ruin, by the same 375 Winter night
Sleeping Infant, to a

427

Young Divine, to a, on his ordina-
Sonnet by Alcander

232
tion day

84

81

REVIEW
Address to Massa. Charitable Fire London Review

323, 368, 421
Society, by Edward Gray, Esq. 511 Miscellaneous Works of David
Address before the Roxbury Char Humphreys, Esq.

507
itable Society, by Luther Rich Milton Hill, a poem, by H. M. Lille 566
ardson, Esq.

608 Miscellaneous Poems, by Susanna
Art of Singing ; in three parts, by

Rowion

611
Andrew Law

136 Musical Magazine, No. 1, by An-
Artillery Election Sermon, by Rev.

drew Law

657
Joseph Tuckerman

451 Narrative of the religious Contro-
Beauties of Church Mufick ; and versy in Fitchburg

654
the fure guide to the art of ling Observations on the Trial by Jury 659

ing, &c. by William Cooper 190 Oration on the 4th of July, 1804,
Boston ; a poem, by W. Sargent 421 by Dr. Thomas Danforth 411
British Spy.

516 Oration on the Cellion of Louif-
Broad Grins, by Coleman, jun. 89 ana, by Dr. Ramsay

413
Brief Retrospect of the eighteenth Oration on the 4th of July, 1804,
century, by S. Miller,D.D. 233,317,362 by J. Pickering, Esq.

464
Clergyman's Looking Glass, No. IV. 612 Observations on the Phthisis Pul-
Conftitutionalist
512 monalis, by Dr. Rand

609
Collections of the Massachusetts Obi,or History of three-finger'd Jack 188
Historical Society, Vol. I. 554 Oration on the Death of Ebenezer

Vol. II. 605 G. Marsh, by Bancroft Fowler $21
Discourse before the Humane So Papers on Agriculture

465
ciety, by Dr. John C. Howard 467 Peasant's Fate, a rural poem 185
Differtation upon the Cholera In Ruling Passion, a poem, by Thomas
fantum, by Dr. Mann

560
Paine, A. M.

365
Election Sermon, by Rev. Mr. Ken Religious Tradesman

553
dall

514 Sermon on the Death of Mr. Eben-
Eternal Purpose of God the foun ezer G. Marsh, by Dr. Dwight 320

dation of effectual Calling, a fer Sermon, at the Consecration of

mon, by Rev. Dr. Baldwin 365 Mount Vernon Lodge, by Br.
Eulogy on the Death of General Thomas Beedé

ib.
Hamilton, by Hon. H. G. Otis 462 Sermons on various important Sub-
Elements of general Knowledge, jects, by Rev. Andrew Lee

615
introductory to useful Books in Sermon at the Dedication of the
the principal Branches of Litera-

New North Church, by Dr. Eliot 410
ture and Science, by Henry Kett 91 True History of the Conquest of
God's Challenge to Infidels to de Mexico, by Capt. Bernal Diaz
fend their Cause, by Joseph

del Castillo

417
Lathrop, D.D.

46 The Truth and Excellence of the
Introduction to Spelling and Read Christian Religion, by H. Adams 563
ing, Vol. 1st, by Abner Alden 464 Travels of 4 Years and an half in

Vol. 2. 558 the United States, by John Davis 195
Life and posthumous Works of W. Two Discourses on the Validity of

Cowper, Esq. by William Hayley 41 Baptism by Sprinkling, by Dr.
Life of Voltaire, by Condorcet
44 Olgood

822, 859

To CORRESPONDENTS.

Several communications have been just received; but they came to late to be inserted in this NUMBER. Correspondents are invited, for the future, to send their favours to the office, where this publication is printed.

We hope the design of HECTOR MOWBRAY, in his address, will be easily intelligible to every reader. We fincerely thank him for it.

We are much pleased in reading the THEATRICAL Review of Lucilius. It displays learning, and critical talents ; But for particular reasons, we refuse to admit it into our publication.

“The Plaint,by Anthony, is a doleful one ; O dear, what can the matter be ?»

The Elegy, by W.Jball appear in our next Number.

The first offerings of Telon, Tom Hafty, and Momus, are reje&ed.

TheOde to Sleep,” by C. will probably appear in our next.

Mariano, it is hoped, will excuse the small liberties we bave taken, in abridging his communication.

ERRATUM.

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THE

MONTHLY ANTHOLOGY,

FOR

NOVEMBER, 1803.

For the MONTHLY ANTHOLOGY,

THE LOITERER.-No. I.

Who would not choose to be awake,
While he's encompass'd round with such delight?

COWLEY. It has been often observed, that no part of the earth combines more local advantages, than the American Republic. Our soil affords an unfailing plenty of fruits; and by an attentive culture, it yields all the variety of dainties, that are fought by the most whimsical appetite. The climate is usually serene and healthful, and we are seldom molested by the turbulent sports of dature.

We can live and perhaps Aourish with independence ; yet our maritime situation offers us the richest benefits of commerce. Our national strength has now become mighty, and is every where viewed with awe and respect. We enjoy the blesings of peace, and our own unanimous abilities are alone requisite for their continual preservation. We are capable of knowing and exercising all the arts, that can poflibly meliorate and adorn our condition. Could we add to ourselves a character of literary excellence, we might well emulate the most celebrated nation, that ever existed.

We are indeed favoured with every mean of advancing in knowledge and refinement. Universal commerce opens to our attainment the literature and improvements of the whole globe. Schools and Colleges are interspersed throughout the country, and are rendered accessible to studious youth of the humblest fortune. Experience has already shown us the utility of learn

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