The Believing Primate: Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Reflections on the Origin of Religion

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Jeffrey Schloss, Michael Murray
OUP Oxford, 2009 M03 12 - 384 páginas
Over the last two decades, scientific accounts of religion have received a great deal of scholarly and popular attention both because of their intrinsic interest and because they are widely seen as potentially constituting a threat to the religion they analyse. The Believing Primate aims to describe and discuss these scientific accounts as well as to assess their implications. The volume begins with essays by leading scientists in the field, describing these accounts and discussing evidence in their favour. Philosophical and theological reflections on these accounts follow, offered by leading philosophers, theologians, and scientists. This diverse group of scholars address some fascinating underlying questions: Do scientific accounts of religion undermine the justification of religious belief? Do such accounts show religion to be an accidental by-product of our evolutionary development? And, whilst we seem naturally disposed toward religion, would we fare better or worse without it? Bringing together dissenting perspectives, this provocative collection will serve to freshly illuminate ongoing debate on these perennial questions.
 

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Contenido

Introduction
1
Punishment and Cognition in the Evolution of Cooperation
26
Cognitive Adaptations for Religious Behavior
44
3 Cognitive Science Religion and Theology
76
4 Is Religion Adaptive? Yes No Neutral But Mostly We Dont Know
100
5 Religious Belief as an Evolutionary Accident
118
Some Thoughts on Paul Blooms Religious Belief as an Evolutionary Accident
128
7 Games Scientists Play
139
10 Explaining Religious Experience
200
Where Science and Religion Fuse
215
How Much Can Biology Explain?
246
A Philosophical and Theological Appraisal
265
14 Moral Psychology and the Misunderstanding of Religion
278
15 Does Naturalism Warrant a Moral Belief in Universal Benevolence and Human Rights?
292
Narrowing but Not Yet Bridging the Gap
318
Bibliography
339

8 Scientific Explanations of Religion and the Justification of Religious Belief
168
Explaining and Explaining Away
179

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Michael Murray is the Arthur and Katherine Shadek Professor in the Humanities and Philosophy at Franklin and Marshall College (Lancaster, PA). He received his B.A. at Franklin & Marshall College, and his M.A, and Ph.D at the University of Notre Dame. He has held fellowships from the Institute for Research in the Humanities (Madison, Wisconsin), the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Philosophical Society, and the Notre Dame Center for Philosophy of Religion.

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