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Bright and more bright the circling halo beamed
Upon that face clothed in a smile benign,
Though yet examinate. Nor long the reign
Of death ; the eyes that wept for human griefs
Unclose, and look around for conscious joy.
Yes; with returning life, the first emotion
That glowed in Jesus' breast of love, was joy
At man's redemption, now complete ; at death
Disarmed; the grave transformed into the couch
Of faith ; the resurrection and the life.
Majestical he rose; trembled the earth;
The ponderous gate of stone was roll'd away;
The keepers fell; the angel, awe-struck, shrunk
Into invisibility, while forth
The Saviour of the world walked, and stood
Before the sepulchre, and viewed the clouds
Empurpled glorious by the rising sun.

GRAHAME.

JESUS CALMS THE TEMPEST.

Matt. viii. 23–27. The roaring tumult of the billowed sea Awakes him not: high on the crested surge, Now heaved, his locks flow streaming in the blast; And, now descending, 'tween the sheltering waves, The falling tresses veil the face divine : Meek through that veil, a momentary gleam, Benignant, shines ; he dreams that he beholds The opening eyes,-that long hopeless had rolled, In darkness,-look around bedimmed with tears Of joy; but, suddenly, the voice of fear Dispelled the happy vision : awful he rose, Rebuked the wind, and said unto the sea, Peace, be thou still! and straight there was a calm. With terror-mingled gladness in their looks, The mariners exclaim,-- What man is this, That even the wind and sea obey his voice!

GRAHAME.

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ADDRESS TO THE SUNDAY SCHOOL

CHILDREN AND TEACHERS BELONG-
ING TO ST. MARY'S EPISCOPAL CHA.
PEL, GLASGOW.

BY THE Rev. ISAAC HITCHEN, M.A. DEAR CHILDREN AND FRIENDS,--To detain you, longon such an occasion and on such a day (New: Year's Day, 1843) would be as ill-judged as to : dismiss you without any exhortation at all. I shall therefore be brief in my remarks ; but I re-, quest from you most serious attention while they: last.,

In times of old, men differed in their determi-: nation of what was the chief good, or of what: mankind ought principally to strive for; and this i variety of- opinion arose from the fact that the: immortality of the soul, or the incapability of the : soul's dying, and a future state of rewards and punishments, were facts only indistinctly guessed: at by some, and entirely unknown to others. i Among the lesser interests of mankind (for all other interests are small), therefore, as it wasi most difficult to select an universally predominant one-one passing without exception all others, in i importance so such attempted selection was ever varying.

Some placed the greatest human good in mili-: · tary renown-fame as great warriors; some in

the acquirement of letters the being accounted learned above other men; some in the accumula-, tion of wealth ; some in sensual gratification-in the unrestrained indulgence of appetite; some in general apathy-a deadness to all feeling. Recollect that these doubts and differences, existed

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