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You can enter somewhat into my feelings on returning to my own chamber, for before I went, my soul had agonized in prayer for them, more particularly for Maria, having heard that during the past week, she had appeared rather thoughtful, and had said, that she “never liked the teaching time so well as the last Sabbath evening'.

This time twelvemonths I was very ill, and thinking I should never meet my class again, I was anxious to write to them, though much fatigued. A few months after, one of the girls wrote to me saying, " that that note was the means blest of God to her soul. I feel towards them, as if they were my own, and desire to “watch for their souls, as one that must give an account.” God could not confer a greater honor on me ;--to Him be ALL the glory given!

MISCELLANEOUS
IMPORTANCE OF DECISION IN NONCON-

FORMISTS.

EXTRACTED FROM A LETTER WRITTEN BY THE LATE BISHOP

JEBB, PUBLISHED IN “THIRTY YEARS' CORRESPONDENCE BETWEEN JOHN JEBB, D, D. F. R. S., BISHOP OF LIMERICK, ARDFORT, AND AGHADOE; AND ABRAHAM KNOX, ESQ., M. R. I. A." TWO VOLS. 8vo. LONDON :-DUNCAN, 1834.

" The fact is, that one feels infinitely more disposed to congenialize with an honest, orthodox, pious dissenter, than with a perhaps equally honest, orthodox, and pious evangelic, who professesto love,and who thinks he supports our establishment, whilst in reality, he both deteriorates and undermines it. And the reason is obvious. The strict dissenter properly fills his providential function; the evangelized churchman does not. Nor is this a mere theoretic distinction. For assuredly, whosoever departs in any degree from his proper providential sphere, in so departing must suffer loss. His movements cannot be steady; his principles cannot be rooted and grounded ; his conduct cannot be free, from more or less of trimming or obliquity. There is a certain sobriety of conviction, a sort of absence of all conscientious misgiving, which cannot be purchased by any lower price than a wise study of one's principles, and a steady adherence of the lawful course which they demand. When, therefore,

I see a spurious liberality, either in churchmen or dissenters, when I see the one ready to view as merely subordinate, and almost indifferent, the goodly order of the hierarchial institution ; or the other ready to scoff at the conscientious scruples which kept their forefathers without the pale, I cannot help apprehending in each instance respectively, that the light is turning into darkness, and that the salt is losing its savor." Abington Glebe.

August, 9th, 1814.

CANDID CONFESSION. Two great systems are growing up into larger proportions and distinctive outlines: each aiming at the entire destrucion of the other ; each disclosing a vast harmonio us whole. Each grasps the world. In England especially, are they in collision; they fight for the Anglican communion, for the temporal influence of the British empire, for our literature, our philosophy, onr poetry, our education ; for every city, town, and village; for every body, soul, and mind; for every day and hour; for every act and form of action ; for every passing thought and feeling of our lives. The one is a system which Europe and the whole world knows by the name of “PROTESTANTISM," and which in England cannot be identical with the Church of England, inasmuch as it includes and counts for its most genuine followers, the most lax and irregular members of that church, and still more, its most professed and bitter enemies. If the Church of England does now, and ever has, whenever she had a tongue to express herself, refuse to call herself by this name, (i. e. PROTESTANT!) she does, in fact, only refuse to wear the colors and uniform, and enlist herself in the very ranks of her implacable, consuming, devouring, and too successful!! FOE.

British Critic, Ixv. Jan. 1843. p. 278.-The italics and brackets are ours.

POETRY. “ FIGHT THE GOOD FIGHT OF FAITH.”

1. Timothy vi. 12.
HARK! 'tis the Prince of heaven commands

Each christian soldier to the field,
To fill the ranks and swell the bands

Which do the gospel's weapons wield.

Behold his foes! they pour along,

Guilt, death, and hell are in their train, ". 'Tis Satan heads the impious throng,

And would o'er all exalted reign.

Then let our courage and our might,

Our zeal and valour, all be shown, To gain for heaven this glorious fight,

And hurl the tyrant from his throne.

For oh! remember, each must be

A friend, decided, or a foe; Neither admits neutrality,

'Tis endless bliss, or endless woe.

Lord, make me thine, and let me wear

Thy armour, counting it no shame, Thy truth and mercy to declare,

And spread the triumphs of thy name.

Essex.

E. F. H.

SHEARCROFT, PRINTER, BRAINTREE.

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CONTENTS.-A Sermon by the Rev. C. Berry, Hatfield
Heath :- An Important Question to be Answered-A Cate-
chism of New Testament Principles, respecting the Consti-
tution and Government of the Church of Christ, by the late
Charles Nice Davies--Historical Account of the Congrega-
tional Church, Bocking, Memoir of the Rev. Joseph Pitts,

(ECCLESIASTICS.) Reclaiming Dissenters—The Church
Member's Monitor--(POETRY.) An Address delivered to
the Teachers of the Rochford Independent Sunday-school,
January 17th, 1843.

SERMON.
WILL YE ALSO BE HIS DISCIPLES? John ix. 27.

This chapter records a signal miracle which our
blessed Lord wrought, in restoring sight to a poor
mar., who had been blind from his birth; and all
the varied circumstances connected with this event,
are recorded with so much evident simplicity and
fairness, that we might safely rest the Divine
authority of our Saviour's mission, upon this
miracle alone. The blind man himself is positive
as to Jesus having effected his cure ; and he was
not a partizan of the Saviour's, but an entire

stranger of him. The parents of the individual were obliged to admit the restoration of their son. The miracle is scrutinized by our Lord's most bitter enemies—the Pharisees, but in vain do they attempt to disprove the fact. The poor man, thus miraculously restored, persists in his statement, as to the reality of his cure-braves the threat of excommunication--and boldly reasons with his opponents on the event. The Pharisees confounded, ask him again to rehearse the particulars of the case; but he answers them, “ I have told you already, and ye did not hear; wherefore would you hear it again ? will ye also be his disciples ?" It is not, however, my friends, the miraculous cure, which is to be the subject of our present discourse, but rather, the simple, yet all-important question proposed in the words just read :-“Will ye also be his discipies?Some persons may think that the man, on whom this miracle of healing was wrought, put the question to the Pharisees seriously, as if anxious for a favorable reply ;-others, perhaps, may consider that he proposed the question ironically, purposely to ridicule them. Whatever might have been the enquirer's motive in the text, the question is in itself of infinite importance, and as such we put it to you my readers, upon the present occasion with the greatest solemnity. Observe attentively the question here proposed : and then remember an answer is expected.

I. Consider the question proposed :-"Will ye also be his disciples ?" We must give the spirit and the import of the enquiry. .

Who is the Master, referred to ?

The Lord

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