Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

SCENES OF FAMILIAR LIFE

SCÈNE I

AU PREMIER DEJEUNER

MONSIEUR GROUVEL, (old gentleman in dressing-gown,

a silk handkerchief round his head). MADAME PUISBUX, (his housekeeper in cap and apron)

MONSIEUR GROUVEL. Sept heures vont sonner, et le café n'est pas sur la table ; c'est trop fort.

(He rings.) MADAMB PUISEUX. Monsieur'a sonné? MONSIEUR GROUVEL. Mai oui, où est le café ?

MADAME PUISEUX. Je l'apporte à l'instant ; il n'est pas encore sept heures.

MONSIBUR GROUVEL. Voyons, dépêchez-vous, s'il vous plait.

MADAME PUISEUX. J'allais l'apporter quand monsieur a sonné et m'a empêchée de monter le déjeuner.

MONSIBUR GROUVEL. C'est bien. Donnez moi mon journal, s'il vous plait.

MADAME PUISEUX. Le voici, monsieur (hands him the newspaper

and MONSIEUR GROUVEL (alone). Ma gouvernante devient inexacte et raisonneuse. Hm! Hm! Deux grandes imperfections. Je ne puis pas supporter le manque de ponctualité ; quant aux caquetages, j'en ai horreur! (The clock strikes seven ; on the seventh stroke Madame Puiseux arrives with a tray.)

MADAME PUISBUX. Voilà, monsieur, le café est prêt. Monsieur mangera-t-il un euf ce matin ?

goes out).

Now Ready. Pott 8vo. Price is. 6d.

FRENCH PLAYS FOR SCHOOLS

BY

MRS. J. G. FRAZER

(LILLY GROVE)

WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY MISS E. P. HUGHES

AND EXPLANATORY NOTES BY THE AUTHOR

London
MACMILLAN AND CO., LIMITED

NEW YORK: THE MACMILLAN COMPANY

PRESS OPINIONS

EDUCATIONAL NEWS.—"These plays we praise highly, on every point, for school use.

CAMBRIDGE REVIEW.-"This neat little book supplies a long-felt want. We can confidently say that they will be of the greatest help towards that mastery of colloquial French which is so lamentably wanting in the average learner.”

EDUCATIONAL TIMES.-"Readable throughout, entertaining, and instructive. They supply, indeed, as is claimed for them, a much and long-felt want. The notes are all that can be desired."

[ocr errors]

13

HATEZ-VOUS LENTEMENT

SCENE I M. Legrand (va et vient dans le salon, dérange les meubles, en ayant l'air de chercher quelquechose ; il appelle) Virginie ! (il regarde la pendule puis le cartel) s Virginie ! (il regarde sa montre) Virginie !

Mme. Legrand (arrive très lentement et parle avec une lenteur affectée). Qu'y a-t-il ? On dirait que le feu est à la maison. Tu cries comme un aigle, tu m'écorches les oreilles avec ton Virginie ! Virginie !

M. Legrand (qui pendant ce discours a de nouveau consulté la pendule et sa montre, en essayant d'interrompre sa femme). Je suis excessivement pressé, Virginie, tu sais bien qu'aujourd'hui il y a séance à la société d'entomologie.

Mme. Legrand. Aujourd'hui c'est la société d'ento. mologie, demain c'est la société de conchyologie, aprèsdemain c'est la société d'une autre “logie.Que sais-je ? Mais vois-tu, Anatole ! avec toutes tes logies " tu te

rends insupporta ble dans ton propre logis. Et moi j'en 20 ai par-dessus la tête.

M. Legrand (à part, pendant que Mme. Legrand s'installe dans un fauteuil en déployant un journal). La voilà partie-impossible d'arrêter ce moulin à paroles !

Elle a des qualités, ma femme, je l'avoue, mais elle 25 ne peut pas comprendre qu'on soit presséelle ne

se rend pas compte qu'une minute et une minute font deux minutes ; c'est comme un sens qui lui manque ! (Il tire sa montre.) Mais je cherchais quelquechose ? (Se frappant le front) Ah oui ! c'est mon chapeau. (Il regarde sous les meubles.)

Mme. Legrand (relevant sa robe). Aurais-tu par hasard encore laissé échapper une de tes araignées ? Que cherches-tu?

M. Legrand. Je ne peux trouver mon chapeau, et il 35 faut absolument que je parte pour assister à la séance.

Mme. Legrand. Ton chapeau--malheureux ! mais il est sur ta tête.

30

HACMILLAN AND CO., LTD., LONDON

considered

Exercise Books in 8 parts, for use of Pupils. Crown 8vo.

Sewed. 6d. each. The same, complete in one volume, with Introduction, for the use of

Teachers. Cloth. 38. 6d.

LIVING METHOD OF LEARNING

LANGUAGES

The Study of French

ACCORDING TO THE

BEST AND NEWEST SYSTEMS

BY

ALFRED F. EUGÈNE
SSEUR OFFICIEL DE L'ENSEIGNEMENT SECONDAIRE, UNIVERSITÉ DE FRANCE)

AND

H. E. DURIAUX

London
MACMILLAN AND CO., LIMITED

NEW YORK : THE MACMILLAN COMPANY

All rights reserved

clear ;

Educational Times.--"The book before us seems, at all points, to be an advance on similar books previously published—more complete, more varied, more interesting, more in keeping, in its general outline and treatment, with the requirements of the classroom, the equipment to be furnished to the pupil. . . . The subjects are practical, varied, and well graduated, embracing, as they do, all that may well come in one's way in general conversation. Certainly, the study of French, with such a book, can never be tedious to the pupils, unless, indeed, the teachers make it so.

It is thoroughly well got up, and free from errors.” University Correspondent.-—"It is hard to see how the English schoolboy of to-day can help learning French thoroughly, so many are the excellent guides at the disposal of his teachers. Of these, the present work is a good example. The book claims to teach the language in a living and natural way, and, if the British boy will only consent to learn it so, all will be well. The arrangement of the book is good and

the most useful kinds of phrases are selected. . .. At any rate, if the teaching of the language depended only upon the book used, this kind of book would ensure wonderful success.”

Saturday Review.—"That it is a rapid and effective method of teaching languages, experience has already proved. MM. Eugène and Duriaux have done their work well, and their book can be recommended to all those who have seen reason to be dissatisfied with the method of teaching French at present in vogue.”

Oxford Magazine.—“We are of opinion that a master or a mistress, who is sympathetic and full of resource, will find the present work most suggestive, and that pupils taught in the manner indicated will make sound and rapid progress, provided that the classes are sufficiently small."

Cambridge Review.—“We hope that what is said here is enough to make everyone who wishes to teach those who can't speak French or understand spoken French try the method. It certainly begins in exactly the right way.”

South African Educator.-—"The book is likely to be a useful help to the teaching of French."

Scotsman.—“The system has much to recommend it, and deserves the attention of teachers."

Glasgow Herald.—“Those who favour this system will find the authors have provided good material for its application."

« AnteriorContinuar »