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The following brief extracts are taken from among several hundred favourable reviews of Prof. Buchheim's Poetical Selections :

HEINE'S LIEDER UND GEDICHTE Guardian.—“It is needless to say that in the present volume only the nobler side of the poet is represented. To those who are already admirers of Heine this pretty little volume will appeal as presenting an old favourite in a new and pleasant form, and Students of German literature, who do not already know one of its most delightful poets, can hardly make his aquaintance under more favourable circumstances.”

Athenæum.—“Dr. Buchheim has written a judicious and sensible preface to the selection of Heine's Lieder und Gedichte, and has subjoined excellent notes. His pleasant volume may be warmly commended to lovers of German poetry.'

Literature. -—“As a whole the volume illustrates Heine's complex qualities remarkably well.”

Bookman. — “ The present selection is to all intents and purposes a perfect one, for it shows a great poet at his best."

Westminster Gazette.—“The arrangement of the poems, and all the rest are excellent.

BALLADEN UND ROMANZEN Times.-" The name of Dr. Buchheim is a sufficient guarantee of the excellence of his new contribution to the 'Golden Treasury Series.'”

St. James's Gazette.-—"Every piece that is given is good, and the collection as a whole representative. The introduction and notes are patterns of their kind."

Pall Mall Gazette.--"Dr. Buchheim's introduction and notes are also excellent. For the rest, his works on German literature are like good wine which needs no busk.'

The Author.—“It is a very beautiful collection and ought most certainly to be in the possession of all who read and love German poetry.”

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DEUTSCHE LYRIK Spectator. -"That it is in itself a delightful little book, we can testify from the pleasure we have derived from it."

Daily News.—"To readers of German this volume will give great pleasure.” Globe." The editor has achieved his task with excellent taste."

Westminster Review.—“Dr. Buchheim has produced a book which all lovers of German poetry will welcome.”

Standard. -- This is an excellent selection from the works of the principal German poets.”

Now Ready. Crown 8vo. Price 35. 6d.

MACMILLAN'S ELEMENTARY LATIN-ENGLISH

DICTIONARY

TO THE PROSE WRITINGS OF CAESAR. SALLUST, NEPOS,
LIVY, EUTROPIUS, AND PORTIONS OF CICERO; AND
THE POEMS OF CATULLUS, VIRGIL, HORACE,

OVID, AND PHAEDRUS

FOR USE IN

PREPARATORY SCHOOLS AND JUNIOR FORMS

BY THE REV.

G. H. NALL, M.A.

ASSISTANT MASTER AT WESTMINSTER SCHOOL

London
MACMILLAN AND CO., LIMITED

NEW YORK: THE MACMILLAN COMPANY

All rights reserved

PREFACE

This small Dictionary has been prepared at the request of Messrs. MACMILLAN AND Co., and is primarily intended to meet the needs of young pupils. Several excellent Latin-English Dictionaries are already in use in our schools, well adapted to the requirements of Middle and Upper Forms. The publishers believe that there is a demand for a Dictionary which does not attempt to compete with these, but is modelled rather on the lines of a simple Vocabulary.

any value.

Practical experience proves that numerous examples and quotations, though valuable and necessary for older or more advanced pupils, bewilder rather than help the youthful beginner. For this reason in many schools Dictionaries have been altogether discarded in the Lower Forms, and the pupils use editions supplied with a special Vocabulary.

I should have wished not only to cut down the examples, but to still further simplify the book by omitting all save the most elementary derivations ; but to do this, I am told, would impair its value in the eyes of many teachers. I have therefore inserted the usually received etymologies, except where they are too doubtful or obscure to be of

The number of authors read in “ Easy Selections” has increased so much in recent years, that it has been a difficult matter to decide what words to omit and what to include. I believe that the choice I have made will prove sufficient for the needs of those for whom the book is specially intended ; indeed I think that I have erred rather in the direction of excess than of defect. I am not without hope that the Dictionary may be found useful in some cases for older boys, those on the modern side for instance, or those who are getting up a modicum of Latin for examination purposes.

The reduction in the quantity of matter has made it possible to print this book in exceptionally large and clear type, on good paper, and to issue it at a low price. An elementary school book is not a joy for ever to its possessor, and I trust that the cheapness of this little work will enable many a boy to consign his copy with a light heart to the flames, before it has reached a wizened and unsightly old age.

In preparing the book I have made free use of the labours of my predecessors. I refrain from enumerating them, not from any desire to conceal the extent of my obligation, but lest the length of the list should seem out of proportion to the modest and unpretentious character of the resulting work. For any notes of errors or omissions, which should be addressed to me direct or to the publishers, I shall be grateful.

PRBPARATORY SCHOOLS RBVIBW.-"A capital book for use in Preparatory Schools. The book is quite the cheapest Latin Dictionary which can claim to be at all satisfactory; and it is very doubtful whether anything will be lost by the omission of more copious instances, which, useful as they are to an older hand, are mostly wasted on, and even bewilder, the Preparatory School boy."

SCHOOLMASTBR.—"The book should prove very handy to beginners, to whom the ordinary large dictionaries are an incumbrance and a source of perplexity, and seems to meet a real want in a highly satisfactory manner.'

SCHOOL GUARDIAN.-"This is certainly the best elementary' Latin and English Dictionary we have seen, and is admirably suited for use in preparatory schools and the senior forms of our Public Schools. Mr. Nall evidently understands what boys want who are 'getting up a modicum of Latin for examination purposes.""

BDUCATIONAL TIMBS.--"A wonderfully cheap and well-executed book, and should find wide acceptance in schools."

SCHOOL BOARD CHRONICLB.—"The work has been done with great care and sympathy with elementary difficulties. And its inexpensiveness is an important element of its many practical merits."

SPRAKBR.—"The matter is compressed with no little skill, while the phrases included show good judgment; so that, although the print is in exceptionally large and clear type, it is confined within the limits of 430 pages. judge without some months of constant usage, this Dictionary will amply reward the curiosity of young students, and help to inform them with sound scholarship from the beginning."

As far as one can

MANCIPIUM

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MANUMITTO

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out money. 2. (meton.) ownership, posses- were common soldiers, Cic. månšpåläris, sion, property. 3. (fig.) a slave purchased | is, m. 1. a member of a maniple, private. by mancipium ; in gen, a slave.

2. member of the same maniple, comrade. mancipo (mancopo), āre, āvi, ātum, mănîpůlātim, adv. [manipulus], by tr.v. [manceps), make over property by maniples, Liv. mancipium, sell, transfer.

mănîpůlus (sync. poet, măniplus), i, mancus, a, um, adj. 1. maimed, in- m. [manus, pleo]. 1. a handful; bundle firm. 2. defective, imperfect.

of hay, etc. 2. (milit. t.t.) a company of mandātum, i, n. [mando), charge, soldiers, a maniple, because, it is said, in order, commission, command.

old days a pole with handful of straw or mandātus, ūs, m. [id.] (only in abl. s.), hay twisted about it served as a standard. command, mandate, Cic.

Manlius, a, the name of a R. gens. Mandēla, ae, f., town in Samnium. Manlsus (Manliānus), a, um, adj.

1. mando, āre, āvi, ātum, tr.v. [manus, mannus, i, m. [Celtic word), cob, nag. do). 1. commit to one's charge, com- māno, āre, āvi, ātum, v. [cf. madeo]. mission, enjoin, command. 2. consign, A. intr. 1. trickle, flow, drop, distil. 2. entrust ; se fugae, take to flight, Caes. (meton.) spread, be diffused. 3. (of

2. mando, ère, di, sum, tr.v. [madeo, rumour, etc.) spread abroad. 4. arise, prop. moisten]. 1. chew, masticate. 2. eat, proceed. 6. escape, be forgotten, de pectore, devour ; humum, bite the ground, Verg. Hor. B. tr., cause to flow, shed, distil.

Mandubii, õrum, m. pl., a Gallic mansio, õnis, f. [maneo), a staying. people, whose chief town was Alesia. mansúē-făcio, făcere, fēci, factum (pass.

māně [Old Lat. manus, good, cf. Manes]. mansúē-f1o,fìěri,factus), tr.v.[mansuetus, I. subst. indecl. n., the morning, morn. facio). 1. tame. 2. (fig.) pacify, civilise. II. adv., in the morning.

manstesco, ére, sůēvi, sůētum, v. måněo, ēre, nsi, nsum, v. [cf. uévw). [manus, suesco, accustom to the hand]. A. intr., stay, remain, abide, continue, A. tr., tame. B. intr., grow tame, gentle, last. B. tr., wait for, await.

07 softened. mansúētus, see below. Mānes (mānes), sum, m. pl. [Old Lat. mansúētē, adv. [mansuetus], gently,

=good]. 1. deified souls of the dead; mildly, calmly. the gods of Lower World ; ghosts, shades. manstētudo, Înis, f. [id.], mildness, II. 1. the Lower World. 2. punishments gentleness, clemency. of the Lower World, our 'Hell,' quisque manstētus, a, um, p.p. of mansuesco; suos patimur manes, Verg.

3. corpse.

as adj. 1. tame. 2. mild, gentle, calm. mango, ōnis, m. [uáyyavov], slave- Comp. mansuetior, sup. mansuetissimus. dealer, Hor.

mansus, p.p. of 1. mando, 2. maneo. månibrium, see manubrium.

mantēle,is,and mantēlium, ii(manti-), mănicae, ārum, f. pl. [manus]. 1. n. [manus, tela), towel, napkin, Verg. long sleeves of tunic reaching to hand, mantica, ae, f. [manus), bag, portserving as glove. 2. glove or muff. manteau, wallet. (meton.) handcuffs, manacles, Verg. Manto, ūs, f. 1. prophetess, dr. of

månicātus, a, um, adj. [manicae), Tiresias. 2. Italian prophetic nymph, furnished with long sleeves, Cic.

founder of Mantua. mănifestē (-festo), adv. [manifestus], Mantúa, ae, f., city of Gallia Transclearly, evidently. Comp. manifestius. padana, near which was Andes, birth

mănifesto, āre, āvi, ātum, tr.v. [id.], place of Vergil. show clearly, exhibit, manifest.

mănůbiae, ārum, f. pl. [manus], money månifestus (mănúfestus), a, um, adj. obtained from the sale of booty. [manus ; fendo, cf. defendo]. 1. clear, mănübrium (mănibrium), i, n. plain, evident, manifest. 2. brought to ! [manus], handle, hilt, haft. light, proved by direct evidence. 3. mani

månůfestus, see manifestus. festly betraying, convicted of, with gen. mănůmissio, onis, f. [manumitto], the

månįprětřum, see manupretium. freeing of a slave, manumission.

månipulāris (sync. månšplāris, mă- mănumitto or månd mitto, ère, mīsi, nůp-), e, adj. [manipulus), belonging to missum, tr.v. [manus, mitto), set at liberty, a maniple; iudices, jurymen who once I emancipate, free a slave.

manus

3.

Crown 8vo. English-Latin, 3s. 6d.; Latin-English, 3s. 6d.;

or the two parts in one volume, 7s. 6d.

A PHRASEOLOGICAL

ENGLISH-LATIN DICTIONARY

FOR THE USE OF SCHOOLS

BY

CHARLES DUKE YONGE

FORMERLY PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, QUEEN'S COLLEGE BELFAST AUTHOR OF "AN ENGLISH-GREEK LEXICON"

ETC.,

A GRADUS AD PARNASSUM FOR ETON, WESTMINSTER, WINCHESTER, HARROW, CHARTERHOUSE

RUGBY, KING'S COLLEGE," ETC.

SIXTBENTH EDITION

London
MACMILLAN AND CO., LIMITED

NEW YORK : THE MAOMILLAN COMPANY

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