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3. This girth is longer than I want. 4. Did he go north? 5. This bird is not worth very much. 6. He got very swarthy by sitting so

much in the sun. 7. You will not find swarthy men in the

north ; black men dwell in hot lands. 8. The firth of Forth is in Scot-land. 9. Scot-land is the land of his birth. 10. Sum-mer is full of mirth. 11. The sun is hot, the birds sing, and

the lambs run on the grassy sward. . 12. Win-ter al-so is full of mirth, when we

all sit together and chat or sing.

PRACTICE XVI.

ark erk

erk irk ork urk erk ark

ark ork urk irk irk urk ark erk ork ork irk urk ark erk urk ork erk irk ark

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LESSON 19. bark cork dark dirk fork hark jerk

lark

lurk mark murky park pork quirk

quirk Turk *work York shark shirk clerk spark stark

* stork market erf serf

urf turf arf wharf dwarf * scarf *

er

ur

ar

EXERCISE 30. 1. Bring me the bark from the log. 2. Cork is a kind of bark. 3. We had a run in the park. 4. Hark! the pretty bird is sing-ing. 5. The lark went upwards and sang. 6. Fetch me pork from the market. 7. He is not quick at his work. 8. All sparks fly upwards. 9. Do not shirk your work. 10. It is very dark and murky in the park. 11. Dogs do not snort; pigs snort and

grunt, but dogs bark.
12. Hark! the bell is ringing,

Calling us to singing;
Hark! the bell is ringing,
Calling us to singing.

Run! run along!

Let us sing a song ! Hark! hark i the bell is ringing! * Contrast and seu Note on w, p. 79, First Course.

Third Course.

EXERCISE 1. 1. I do not hate him at all. 2. He fell into the pond and met a sad fate. 3. Open the gate and let me in. 4. Did the kite catch the bird ? 5. She can sing to the lute or to the harp. 6. Barking dogs don't bite. 7. The silent dog is the first to bite. 8. You can tell a bird by its note, and a man by

his talk. 9. A crate full of boxes was standing by the waggon. 10. Bring a plate, and put it on the hob of the grate. 11. Can you skate ? No, I can't. . 12. He did it from spite. 13. Did you write the letter? 14. Yes, I wrote it last month. 15. I wrote it on my slate first, and then on paper 16. As you mete, so it shall be meted to you. 17. The church stands on the old site. 18. The wolf killed the pretty white lamb. 19. If he runs at such a rate, I cannot catch him. 20. A bad padlock invites a picklock.

A bad padlock invites a A pichlock.

LESSON 2.
est ed

fate
fat-ed

ing

en

er bite bit-ing

y

ish hate hat-ing

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late
lat-est
white
whit-ish

grate
grat-ing
smite
smit-ing
hide
hid-ing
shade
shad-y

mate
mat-ed
brute
brut-ish
plate
plat-ed
write
writ-ing
ride
rid-ing
con-clude

con-clud-ing
pride
prid-ed

quote
quot-ing
flute
flut-ing
skate
skat-ing
fade
fad-ed
wide
wid-est
glide
glid-ed

prude
prud-ish

EXERCISE 2. 1. She was singing to his fluting. 2. I cannot help concluding from what you told me

that he was late. 3. When the mate of the ship got on land, he put

on a white hat, and dressed himself up; then he rode to London, and walked in the Strand,

as far as Temple Bar. 4. The north wind is biting, cold and dry; the west

wind is soft, warm and wet. 5. You can ride with me, my little lady.

You

can ride with me, my

hille lady.

Please name the volumes required.

MACMILLAN'S

NEW LITERARY READERS

London
MACMILLAN AND CO., LIMITED

NEW YORK: THE MACMILLAN COMPANY

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Reading Sheets (17 Sheets, on Manilla. Size 37x38)

12s. Primer I. (32 pp.) With Coloured Illustrations

4d. II. (48 pp.)

5d. Infant Reader (72 pp.)

6d. Standard O. (88 pp.)

8d. Book I. (112 pp.)

9d. Book IV. (208 pp.) 18. 4d. II. (128 pp.)

10d.

V. (240 pp.) 1s. Bd. III. (176 pp.)

18.

VI. (256 pp.) 18. Bd.

PRESS OPINIONS. Journal of Education._"The editors have performed their compilation with great care and judgment, the result being that the extracts have been judiciously selected, systematically graded, and tersely, yet sufficiently annotated. The letterpress is excellent, the illustrations ample, and the general get up of the books everything that could be desired.”

Educational News.—"The grading of the several lessons, so as to secure safe progress and pleasant interest, is unexceptional. The extracts are skilfully varied, and, in some instances, judiciously condensed. The illustrations are artistic. The binding is bright, the type clear, the paper good, and, in every way, the books do credit to compiler and publishers. The teacher who chooses them will bring within his pupils' reach specimens of cultured thought and graceful style."

Board Teacher.-"Ably edited, these readers supply a distinct want. Their special feature is indicated in their title. The matter is copyright and of a high, yet attractive and suitable literary character. We can heartily recommend them.”

Infants' Mistress.-—"These little books are decidedly well got up in every detail, the illustrations—a good proportion of which are coloured-being of first-rate merit, whilst the matter and method of the lessons are both on rational lines. We believe that as much progress and interest can be got from the New Literary Readers as from any set we have seen.”

Girls' Mistress.—"We have much pleasure in strongly recommending this series of Readers. They are drawn up on correct educational lines."

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