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TAE object of this book, which was undertaken more than four years
ago, is to give, from the literary point of view only, and from direct
reading of the literature itself, as full, as well supplied, and as
conveniently arranged a storehouse of facts as the writer could provide.
The substitution of bird's-eye views and sweeping generalisations for
positive knowledge has been very sedulously avoided; but it is hoped
that the system of Inter-chapters will provide a sufficient chain of
historical summary as to general points, such as, for instance, the
nature and progress of English prosody and the periods of prose style.
No part of the book has been delivered as lectures ; and the sections of
it concerning the Elizabethan period and the Nineteenth Century are not
replicas of previous work on those subjects.

CONTENTS.

BOOK I.-THE PRELIMINARIES OF ENGLISH LITERATURE.

CHAPTER I.--The Earliest Anglo-Saxon Poetry; CHAPTER II
Cædmon, Cynewulf, and those about them; CHAPTER III.-Anglo-
Saxon Prose ; CHAPTER IV.-The Decadence of Anglo-Saxon. INTER-
CHAPTER I.

BOOK II.-THE MAKING OF ENGLISH LITERATURE.

CHAPTER I. —The Transition; CHAPTER II.--First_Middle English
Period—1200-1250 ; CHAPTER III. --Second Middle English Period-
1300-1360 ; CHAPTER IV.-Early Romances—Metrical ; CHAPTER V.-
Early Romances-Alliterative. INTERCHAPTER II.

BOOK III.-CHAUCER AND HIS CONTEMPORARIES.
CHAPTER I.--Chancer's Life and Poems; CHAPTER II.-Langland and
Gower ; CHAPTER III.—Chaucer's Prose-Wyclif, Trevisa, Mandeville.
INTERCHAPTER III.

-

BOOK IV.--THE FIFTEENTH CENTURY,
CHAPTER I. – The English Chaucerians - Lydgate to Skelton ;
CHAPTER II. –The Scottish Poets-Historical, Political, and Minor;
CHAPTER III. - The Four Great Scottish Poets ; CHAPTER IV.-Later
Romances in Prose and Verse ; CHAPTER V. – Minor Poetry and
Ballads ; CHAPTER VI.-Miscellaneous Prose. INTERCHAPTER IV.

OF SPENSER.
CHAPTER 1.-Preliminaries-Drama ; CHAPTER II.-Preliminaries-
Prose ; CHAPTER III.-Preliminaries—Verse ; CHAPTER IV.-Spenser
and His Contemporaries ; _CHAPTER V. - The University Wits ;
CHAPTER VI.-Lyly and Hooker— The Translators, Pamphleteers,
and Critics. INTERCHAPTER V.

BOOK IX.-MIDDLE AND LATER EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY

LITERATURE.

CHAPTER I.—The Poets from Thomson to Crabbe ; CHAPTER II.
The Eighteenth-Century Novel ; CHAPTER III. -Johnson, Goldsmith,
and the Later Essayists ; CHAPTER IV.—The Graver Prose ; CHAPTER
V. – Eighteenth-Century Drama; CHAPTER VI. – Miscellaneous
Writers. INTERCHAPTER IX.

BOOK X.—THE TRIUMPH OF ROMANCE.
CHAPTER I. –The Poets from Coleridge to Keats ; CHAPTER II.-The
Novel-Scott and Miss Austen ; CHAPTER III. - The New Essay;
CHAPTER IV.–The Last Georgian Prose ; CHAPTER V.-The Minor
Poets of 1800-1830. INTERCHAPTER X.

BOOK XI.- VICTORIAN LITERATURE.
CHAPTER I.—Tennyson and Browning ; CHAPTER II.-The Victorian
Novel ; CHAPTER III.-History and Criticism ; CHAPTER IV.—Poetry
Since the Middle of the Century ; CHAPTER V.-Miscellaneous. Con-
clusion. Index.

In Globe 8vo. Price 25.; Key, 55. net.

A METHOD OF ENGLISH

FOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS

BY

JAMES GOW, M.A., LITT.D.

MASTER OF THE HIGH SCHOOL, NOTTINGHAM; LATE FELLOW OF TRINITY

COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE.

London
MACMILLAN AND CO.,

LIMITED

NEW YORK: THE MACMILLAN COMPANY

EXTRACTS FROM PREFACE “This little book professes to be, not an English Grammar, but a course of English Lessons for the junior forms of Secondary Schools. It contains, indeed, all the grammar that is of any importance, but it contains other things too, and is written with a certain definite intention. It is intended for children who already speak and write English fairly well, and who are beginning to learn another language.” “In this book (apart from Section I., which deals with Pronunciation) I have begun, as the nature of English requires, with the Sentence. The language has practically no accidence, and uses the same word as several parts of speech ; hence, usually, we cannot parse a word without first seeing it in a sentence, and cannot parse it then without making a mental analysis of the sentence. It was essential, therefore, to deal with analysis first, and proceed to parsing afterwards."

“For the rest, I have kept continually before me the following maxims, which seem to be applicable to the compilation of any school-book whatever : (1) The lessons are to be so arranged that each shall be intelligible

without reference to a later lesson. (2) Each lesson shall seem short, but shall be in fact very substantial. (3) Each lesson shall be immediately followed by exercises. (4) The exercises shall be so difficult as to command respect for the

subject. “Of course a book cannot be written on these lines without requiring energetic teaching, and I have said, in the Notes for the Teacher added at the end, that the Exercises should be done in the first instance viva voce."

“I am in hopes that some teachers will try Section I. I may add also that I find the exercises on spelling afford a sure test of linguistic ability, for they require a boy to search his vocabulary quickly. The Section as a whole is, no doubt, too difficult for the youngest children, but it might be taken by lower classes in small portions as an amusement, and finally taken in its entirety by the highest class that uses the book.”

“The Sections generally are such that each can be easily got through in one term if two hours a week are given to English. Schools which can only give one hour a week will perhaps prefer the following arrangement :

Ist Term, Section II.-Parts of Speech, Ex. 1--12. 2nd Term, Section II.-Parts of Speech, Ex. 13—III. 6. 3rd Term, Section III. -Parts of Speech (not Verb) in Detail, Ex. 7

-end. 4th Term, Section IV.-The Verb in Detail, Ex. 1—12. 5th Term, Section IV.-The Verb in Detail, Ex. 13–V. 6. 6th Term, Section V.-Errors and Figures of Speech, Ex. 7-end

(with revising). 7th Term, Section 1.--Spelling and Pronunciation complete.”

Scotsman-"Written with a praiseworthy and rare appreciation of the importance of the subject, and besides being a good practical school-book, is likely to satisfy the widespread wish to see the teaching of English set on the same level of scholarship as that of the classical languages. It may be heartily recommended to teachers of English." Modern Language Monthly-"The method of this book is new and good.

The opening of the subject by the study of phonetics is quite new in an elementary book, and is much to be commended."

Lyceum-“This is one of the most remarkable books on the teaching of English which has appeared for some time.”

Globe 8vo. Price 2s. KEY. Price 4s. net.

PRINCIPLES OF ENGLISH COMPOSITION THROUGH ANALYSIS AND SYNTHESIS

A TEXT-BOOK FOR THE SENIOR CLASSES OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS AND FOR PUPIL-TEACHERS

BY

P. GOYEN

INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS

London
MACMILLAN AND CO., LIMITED

NEW YORK: THE MACMILLAN COMPANY

CONTENTS :-Part I. The Simple Sentence : Logical Analysis

; Grammatical Analysis–Subject, Predicate, Object ; Concord of Subject and Predicate ; The Function of the Adjective; Kinds of Adjuncts to the Noun; Placement of Adjuncts to the Noun; Pronouns and Pronominal Couples ; Adverbial Adjuncts ; Placement of Adverbial Adjuncts; Order and Distribution of Adverbial Adjuncts; Usual Placement of Subject, Predicate, and Object; Departure from the Usual Order for the sake of Emphasis and Energy; Analysis ; Synthesis.

Part II. The Complex Sentence of Two Clauses : The Noun Clause—its Place and its Equivalents; The Adjective (Relative) Clause and its Equivalents; The Adverbial Clause and its Equivalents; Interchange of Adverb with Adverbial Phrase ; Placement of the Relative Clause; Note on the Relative Clause ; Syntax of the Relative Pronouns ; Placement of the Adverbial Clause ; Note on “Do” and “So”; Note on the Comparisons; Analysis ; Synthesis ; An Important Participial Construction—its Place and its Equivalents ; Absolute Phrases-their Place and their Equivalents.

Part III. The Compound Sentence : The Copulative or Cumulative Relation; The Disjunctive Relation; The Compound Subordinate Clause; Mixed Sentences.

Part IV. The Complex Sentence of more than Two Clauses : Analysis of Complex Sentences of more than two Clauses; Synthesis of Complex Sentences of more than two Clauses.

Part V. Punctuation : Length of the Sentence; Unity of the Sentence. Para. graph Analysis. Figures of Speech.

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