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PART JII

THE COMPOUND SENTENCE

93

tion, as in (c), (d), (e), are called collateral clauses. The relation is cumulative. Notice the fine effect of the ellipsis of the conjunction. W) 'The troops had never fought so well, nor had the genius of their

chief ever been so conspicuous.' Here 'nor'='and not,' and the relation is cumulative. Notice how "nor' attracts the verb.

(9) ‘He was diligent, therefore he succeeded.'

The word 'therefore' is strictly an adverb and does not join the clauses, which may be regarded as collateral, the conjunction and' being understood. When the second clause states a result or consequence of the first clause, it is sometimes said to be in illative (inferential) relation to the first. The relation is really cumulative, like that of the other examples.

(h) 1. 'Man is man and master of his fate.'

2. "The water is nought and the ground barren.' Here and' = and therefore, and consequently.' (i) 'I am a true Englishmau ; I felt to the quick for the disgrace of

England.' =I am a true Englishman, and therefore I felt, etc. The second clause states a consequence of the first, and the ellipsis of "and therefore' makes the statement specially energetic.

II. The opposition or contrast of what the clauses express : the disjunctive relation.

EXAMPLES (a) 'Either you must get another watch, or I must get another

secretary.' The one statement is opposed to the other. This is sometimes called the alternative relation, because there is a choice between two statements.

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(6) 'John was brave, but James was a coward.' Here the character of John is contrasted with that of James.

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Academy.—"All through the book is up to the latest points. It is written by the best of our early English scholars, who is at the same time a long-practised and skilful teacher. It is very clearly printed, and well arranged, and as it costs only half-a-crown it ought to find its way into every school and family in the kingdom, if only to correct the mistakes and supply the defects of the ordinary popular grammars so far as their accidence is concerned."

British Quarterly Review.—“This is one of the best and most comprehensive English Grammars we have met with."

Scotsman.—"By the use of a book like this, Grammar may be made, even for young pupils, a far more pleasant, as well as more profitable, study than under the old method of cut-and-dried rules, the reasons for which the learner was left to find out for himself."

School Guardian.-"Dr. Morris's little book is not a mere abridgment of his larger work, the Historical Outlines of English Accidence. It is an entirely independent work, with many peculiarities of arrangement; and the illustrative examples are for the most part new, very few of them having been quoted elsewhere. The part relating to the history of the language is particularly interesting ; but it is in the portion which deals with the processes by which the language assumed its present form, that we find the greatest amount of new matter. Grimm's Law of the Permutation of Consonants is explained with a clcarness and fulness such as we do not remember to have met with in any other elementary treatise, and the remembering of the law is greatly facilitated by some easy mnemonics, for which students will be deeply grateful.

The Etymology is very full, and contains all the information needed for most of the public ordeals in which English is one of the subjects of exam ination. The method of the book is excellent. Everywhere we see indications that the author is not a mere philologist, but a teacher.”

PRIMER OF ENGLISH GRAMMAR. By the late Rev. R.

MORRIS, LL.D. Revised by H. BRADLEY, M. A. Pott 8vo. 18.

EXERCISES ON DR. MORRIS'S PRIMER OF ENGLISH

GRAMMAR. By J. WETHERELL, M.A. Pott 8vo. 18.

ENGLISH GRAMMAR EXERCISES. By the late Rev. R.

MORRIS, LL.D., and H. C. BOWEN, M.A. Pott 8vo. 18.

HISTORICAL OUTLINES OF ENGLISH ACCIDENCE,

comprising Chapters on the History and Development of the Language, and on Word-Formation. By the late Rev. RICHARD MORRIS, M.A., LL.D. Revised by L. KELLNER, Ph.D., with the assistance of HENRY BRADLEY, M.A. Globe 8vo. 68.

By

HISTORICAL OUTLINES OF ENGLISH SYNTAX.
Dr. L. KELLNER. Ex. fcap. 8vo. 68.

Now Ready. Globe 8vo. Price 1s. 6d.

THE PARTS OF SPEECH

AND THEIR USES

AN EASY METHOD OF ENGLISH ANALYSIS

BY

H. W. HOUSEHOLD, M.A.

ASSISTANT MASTER, CLIFTON COLLEGE

WITH A PREFACE BY THE

REV. CANON GLAZEBROOK, M.A.

HEAD MASTER OF CLIFTON COLLEGE

London
MACMILLAN & CO., LIMITED

NEW YORK: THE MACMILLAN COMPANY

All rights reserved

Educational News.--" The principles are right, the method is simple, the essentials are all here, and the author has not made the mistake of overcrowding his pages.

Teachers will do well to give Mr. Household's attempt a full consideration."

Guardian.—" Mr. Household has done his work remarkably well, and we know of no book so well suited for schools where only so much grammar is taught to junior forms as will prepare them for the study of Latin and Greek."

SOME twelve years ago I began to search for a book on English Grammar which should be fairly correct and yet simple enough for children; but more than once I abandoned the search in despair. Meanwhile, the reasons which suggested the enquiry have remained as strong as ever. Common sense urges that the right way to learn grammar is through the mother tongue: the example of France and Germany shows that it can be done; while our too frequent failures to teach Latin in England can often be traced to the fact that our pupils have never really understood the structure of an English sentence.

It is therefore with great pleasure that I welcome Mr. Household's little book, which is a practical attempt to deal with the problem, based upon several years of varied experience. I venture to commend it to teachers mainly on three grounds.—It is extremely simple and bright without being childish. The examples are easy, varied, and appropriate. And whereas the fetish of completeness has been the ruin of many grammars, Mr. Household has had the courage to omit what is not necessary for his purpose.

M. G. GLAZEBROOK.

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