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must also be instructed not to interfere with the navigation of the ship, except at your request; and he must be put entirely under your orders. As you shall have to grant a bill of sale for the brig, when she is apparently sold, you must be very cautious to take a counter bill of sale : and again, as collateral security, a bottomry bond on the vessel for 10,000 dollars, with a power of attorney from the sham owner to you, to sell and dispose of her in any manner you shall think proper. I would wish you, besides, to take a very strong declaration in writing, witnessed by Sealy, Roach, and Toole, that the sale made by you is merely fictitious; that the cargo and her earnings are bona fide your property; which declaration must be couched so as to be a perfect quit claim from him and his heirs for ever.” “It is very essential that none of your people, except those who are to stay with you, should have the least suspicion of your future plan: I would recommend, therefore, that before you enter on any of your transactions, you would see these people out of the country, that they cannot come and talk here of what you have done. I would rather lose some little time, nor would I mind some little expense, to get rid of them cleverly. The ship's log-book should afterwards be Rept in Portuguese : no English writing, touching the voyage, should be on board: the fewer entries in the log-book the better, to be done under your eyes. She should have no colours but Portuguese on board; your present flag thrown away when the brig is sold, and all the papers sent back (under cover) to me: your register, however, you had better bring back yourself.” pp. 36,37.

This vessel sailed from Cabenda on the 1st of January 1811, with 275 slaves on board; and had been at sea twenty days,when the slaves rose,and, after a severe struggle, in which 30 of them were killed, took possession of the vessel, forcing the captain and crew into a boat, into which, however, with an unexampled degree of forbearance and generosity, they put some provisions and water. What became of the boat has not transpired. It was four months before the vessel regained the coast of Africa, the course of the trade winds being adverse to her return thither; and the provisions on board falling -short, the greater part of the Africans p. from hunger. Only eighty

we remained alive when the vessel

was brought to Sierra Leone. What a mass of wretchedness has this one slave adventure produced' In the Report of the Commissioners of African Inquiry, a great part of which is inserted in the Appendix, we meet with much important information. We were particularly struck with that part of it in which, speaking of the great number of Africans that had been brought to Sierra Leone for adjudication, and there released from slavery, they state as follows:

“A cousiderable number of the neares and dearest kindred, husbands and wives, pt. rents and children, brothers and sister, who had been kiduapped or stolen at various times, and put on board different vessel, have been thus unexpectedly restored to each other at Sierra Leone; and whenever any of them have desired to return to their own country, and such return has on deemed practicable, they have beru allowed to do so; being first provided with a PP" under the hand and seal of the governo certifying that they are to be conside." " his people and under his protection, which" looked upon, according to the customs and law of Atrica, to be a sufficient kout"J against further molestation.

“ All the people thus returning home. must naturally be more than ever the “ mies of slavery, as they cannot still in". last few eventful mouths of ouising " liberation, to have acquired some new ideas of freedom, which will of course besiduals diffused amongst their triends; and ** that all white men are not their enemie." that one European nation consides the Soo Trade as unlawful, and is determined, il possible, to put au end to it, the not" may by degrees feel some encour* to liberate themselves from this to thraldom.” p. 69.

Some valuable African memo"

randa, by the late Governor Ludo", a name justly dear to every friend" Africa, follow the Report of to Commissioners. The followingo tract from an account given by that gentleman of a tribe of Afro" called Kroomen, residing near o: Palmas, will afford some idea of entertainment which is provide!" them in this part of the Appendix.

“The indifference of Krcomen to Bo arts and European comforts, mak” think them a very dull race of men, to say the least. I was struck when I first came to Africa with the different unanner in which a Krooman and a Mandingo unan (a Mohaumedan) viewed an English clock. It was a new thing to both of them. The Kroonan eyed it attentively for about a minute, but with an unmoved countenance, and then walked away to look at something else, without saying a word. The Mandingo man could not sufficiently admire the equal and constant motion of the pendulum; his attention was repeatedly drawn to it; he made all possible inquiries as to the cause of its motion; he renewed the subject next morning, and could hardly be persuaded that the Pendulum had continued to “walk,” as he called it, all night. In general, I think, the case is nearly the same. I hey have little or no curiosity about things which are of no use in their own country; they are careless about our comforts and luxuries; none of them have been rendered necessary by habit, and they would often be inconsistent with the principal objects of their pursuit. But Koomen are sufficiently acute and observant where the occasion calls their minds into action; but it is rather from a general view of their character and conduct that I say this, than from particular specimens of ingenuity. They have not the use of letters, and will not permit their children to learn; they talk miserably bad English: living by daily labour, which is paid for in ropean goods, they have no occasion for manufactures of their own. They have but few opportunities, therefore, of displaying Peculiar talents. They make their own canoes, several of their implements of agriculture, and some trifling musical instru*nts: I know not of any thing else worthy of notice. I ought not to omit, however, that they sometimes plead in their own defence with inuch art. The evidence against one of the very last I examined on a charge of thest was so strong, that few men would have had the boldness to deny the charge. The culprit, however, began a long speech with expressing his sorrow that I was not born a Krooman, and proceeded to enlarge on the superior ability I should in that case have possessed to distinguish between truth and falsehood, in all cases wherein Kroomen were concerned; not forgetting the security against deception which I might possibly have obtained by means of those fetishes of which white men knew not the value nar the use. Had I possessed but these advantages, I should have known, he argued, how much more safely I might rely on his

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veracity than on all the evidence produced against him; although it was backed by the unfortunate circumstance of the stolen goods being found in his possession. The substance of his defence was, that he had fairly purchased the goods, not knowing them to be stolen; and that Kroomen, whom he named, were witnesses of the transaction, though for private reasons they would not speak. His guilt was clear: but, had he possessed a tolerable character, he would have had some chance of escaping with a timid jury. He had been tried once or twice before, and acquitted.” pp. 99–101.

A considerable portion of the Appendix is occupied by the Correspondence of a Mr. John Kizell with the Governor of Sierra Leone, detailing his negotiations with the chiefs in the river Sherbro, to whom the Governor had sent him, in the hope of inducing them to concur in measures for effectually abolishin the Slave Trade in that district.

Kizell is one of the negro colonists

of Sierra Leone. He was originally the son of a chief in this very river Sherbro. He was carried, when about twelve years of age, as a slave, to North America; but obtained his freedom by joining the British standard during the American war. At Nova Scotia he acquired so much knowledge of letters as to be able to read and write ; and since he has resided at Sierra Leone he is stated to have uniformly maintained an excellent character. We give the following extract from the communications of this African envoy, as a rare specimen of diplomatic simplicity. “I took this opportunity of talking to the chiefs on the Slave Trade. I told them that the blood of their people cried against them, and that God had heard it. They had killed the poor of the land; the people that should work the land; and had sold them to fill their bellies. All their people were gone or going to other countries. They allowed the Slave Trade to stop their ears, and blind their eyes: for a little run and tobacco they allowed their people to be carried off, and said nothing. I then told them of their bad ways towards their wives, whom they had when they were young, by whom also they had children: but whom, when they get o: old, they will accuse of being 5 B 2

prove the mischievous tendency of the general circulation of the whole of the Scriptures, is nothing more than a revival of the popish arguments against the Reformation. He will find all of them ably answered by anticipation, in the Tracts of the Bartlett's Buildings' Society. We will content ourselves with naming a few of them, to which we would refer our author:—viz. Plain Directions for reading the Holy Scriptures; Archbishop Synge's Charitable Adwice to all that are of the Communion of the Church of Rome; Questions and Answers concerning the two Religions; Archbishop Tillotson's Dissuasive from Popery; Protestant Catechism, &c. &c. We know, however, of no better answer to those popish arguments, which would deprive the poor and unlearned of free access to the well of life, than is contained in the Homilies of the Church of England. “If you be afraid,” says the church, “to fall into error by reading of Holy Scripture, I shall shew you how you may read without danger of error. Read it humbly, with a meek and lowly heart, to the intent you may glorify God, and not yourself, with the knowledge of it; and read it, not without daily praying to God, that he would direct your reading to good effect.”—“ Presumption, and arrogancy are the mother of all error; and humility needeth to fear no error.” “ Therefore, the humble man may search any truth boldly in Scripture, without any danger of error. And if he be ignorant, he ought the more to read, and to search Holy Scripture, to bring him out of ignorance.” “And, concerning the hardness of Scripture,” “whoever giveth his mind to Holy Scriptures, with diligent study and burning desire, it cannot be that he should be left without help; for either God Almighty will send him some godly doctor to teach him,”— “ or Himself from above will give light into our minds, and teach us those things, which are necessary for us, and wherein we be ignorant.”

“Nevertheless, for the hardness of such places, the reading of the whole ought not to be set apart. By the Scripture, all men be amended; weak men be strengthened, and strong men be comforted. So that, surely none be enemies to the reading of God's word, but such as either be so ignorant, that they know not how wholesome a thing it is; or else be so sick, that they hate the most comfortable medicine that should heal them; or so ungodly, that they would wish the people still to continue in blindness and ignorance of God.”—Homily on reading of Holy Scripture, Partii. We are tempted, before we quit this part of our subject, to send Dr. Maltby, for farther instruction upon it, to two of our modern poets. Mr. Crabbe, in the true spirit of a Christian minister, speaking of his illiterate country school-mistres, remarks:

“And what her learning? 'Tis with awe to look

In every verse throughout one sacred book:

From this her joy, her hope, her peace, is sought ;

This she has learned, and she is nobly taught.”

In the same strain, the senphic Cowper describes

“Yon cottager, who weaves at her own door,
Pillow and bobbins, all her little soft'-
“Just knows, and knows no more, her Bik
true,
A truth the brilliant Frenchman never knew:
And in that charter reads with sparkling
eyes
Her title to a treasure in the skies."—
“Oh bless'd effect of penury and want!
The seed sown there, how vigorous in the
plant!
No soil like poverty for growth divine,
As leanest land supplies the richest wine.
Earth gives too little, giving only breed,
To nourish pride or turn the weakes, head.
To them the sounding jargon of the sco"
Seems, what it is, a cap and bell for "
The light they walk by, kindled fona”
Shews them the shortest way to loo
love:
They, strangers to the controverialso
Where deists, always foil'd, yet ""
yield,

And never check'd by what impedes the
wise,
Believe, rush forward, and possess the prize.”
Cow PE1's Truth.

Of the many extraordinary circumstances connected with Dr. Maltby's work, it is surely not one of the least surprising, that the ultimate bearing of his pamphlet is to extol the Society for promoting Christian Knowledge. What, then, is the reasonable inference? Does the Society for promoting Christian Knowledge maintain that the whole of the Bible is neither “ necessary nor intended for the use of all classes of mankind ; ” That “out of sixtysix books, not above seven in the Old Testament, nor above eleven in the New, appear to be calculated for the study or comprehension of the unlearned ” That “the mass of mankind ought no more to expect to understand the prophecies of Ezekiel, or the Epistles of St. Paul, than the tragedies of Æschylus, or the Letters of Cicero and Pliny ” and, by consequence, that many portions of the Scripture, appointed to be read in our churches, should never reach the ears of the poor? Would The Society for promoting Christian Knowledge propose to substitute for the entire copy of the Scriptures “a volume judiciously selected from Cappe's Life of Christ”—the work of an avowed Socinian Are these the arguments by which they would expect to recommend themselves to the patronage of a Christian public Are these the measures by which they intend to form the principles of the rising generation; to train them to all virtue and godliness of living 2 No: we are well persuaded that the Society will not lend themselves to so onworthy a system. The attack of Dr. Maltby on the Bible Society, is also an attack upon them: they, too, have dispersed the whole of the Scriptures for upwards of a century, without note or comment; and even to this hour, they circulate the Book of Genesis, and the Psalms, and the writings of the Prophets and Apostles, without one apparent

feeling of remorse, or any expectation of evil. Yet we know not by what rule of consistency some oppoments of the Bible Society could censure our conduct, if we should charge upon the Society for promoting Christian Knowledge, the strange language which has been held by certain of its advocates. If an injudicious assertion, whether correctly reported or not is of very little consequence, should be attributed, even in the columns of a newspaper, to a friend of the Bible Society, some doughty controversialist is always at hand to visit the offence, not upon the individual merely, but also upon the institution: the Society itself seems to be considered as responsible for all the sentiments, or alleged sentiments, of all its friends. If the advocates of the Bible Society should adopt the same rule of judgment, is there any absurdity, whether of fact or reasoning, which they might not charge home upon the Society for promoting Christian Knowledge? The articles of their belief, and the divergencies of their reasoning, if extracted from the conflicting creeds and irregular sallies of their friends, would be highly amusing: and Dr. Maltby himself would add not a little to the entertainment. But into that subject we will not enter: and the only reason which has induced us even to mention it, is this: to display the extreme unfairness with which the Bible Society has been treated in certain recent publications; and, if possible, to introduce a better taste, sounder principles of reasoning, and a more correct distribution, whether of censure or of praise. There is, however, another view of the subject, which we are unwilling to omit. It has lately been very much the fashion to attack, as enthusiasts, as enemies to good sense and good works, a certain body of men, who are known by the title of Evangelical Clergymen. The way in which the attack is conducted is this: All who agree in some general principles, such as the doctrings 5 A 2 -

prove the mischievous tendency of the general circulation of the whole of the Scriptures, is nothing more than a revival of the popish arguments against the Reformation. He will find all of them ably answered by anticipation, in the Tracts of the Bartlett's Buildings' Society. We will content ourselves with naming a few of them, to which we would refer our author:—viz. Plain Directions for reading the Holy Scriptures; Archbishop Synge's Charitable Advice to all that are of the Communion of the Church of Rome; Questions and Answers concerning the two Religions; Archbishop Tillotson's Dissuasive from Popery; Protestant Catechism, &c. &c.

We know, however, of no better answer to those popish arguments, which would deprive the poor and unlearned of free access to the well of life, than is contained in the Ho

milies of the Church of England. “If

you be afraid,” says the church, “to fall into error by reading of Holy Scripture, I shall shew you how you may read without danger of error. Read it humbly, with a meek and lowly heart, to the intent you may glorify God, and not yourself, with the knowledge of it; and read it, not without daily praying to God, that he would direct your reading to good effect.”—“ Presumption and arrogancy are the mother of all error; and humility needeth to fear no error.” “ Therefore, the humble man may search any truth boldly in Scripture, without any danger of error. And if he be ignorant, he ought the more to read, and to search Holy Scripture, to bring him out of ignorance.” “And, concerning the hardness of Scripture,” “whoever giveth his mind to Holy Scriptures, with diligent study and burning desire, it cannot be that he should be left without help; for either God Almighty will send him some godly doctor to teach him,”— “ or Himself from above will give light into our minds, and teach us those things, which are necessary for us, and wherein we be ignorant.”

“Nevertheless, for the hardness of such places, the reading of the whole ought not to be set apart. By the Scripture, all men be amended; weak men be strengthened, and strong men be comforted. So that, surely none be enemies to the reading of God's word, but such as either be so ignorant, that they know not how wholesome a thing it is; or else be so sick, that they hate the most comfortable medicine that should heal them; or so ungodly, that they would wish the people still to continue in blindness and ignorance of God.”–Homily on reading of Holy Scripture, Partii. We are tempted, before we quit this part of our subject, to send Dr. Maltby, for farther instruction upon it, to two of our modern poets, Mr. Crabbe, in the true spirit of a Christian minister, speaking of his illiterate country school-mistress, remarks: “And what her learning? 'Tis with awe to look In every verse throughout one sacred book: From this her joy, her hope, her peace, is sought; This she has learned, and she is nobly taught.”

In the same strain, the seraphic Cowper describes

“Yon cottager, who weaves at her own door,
Pillow and bobbins, all her little store"—
“Just knows, and knows no more, her Bible
true,
A truth the brilliant Frenchman never knew
And in that charter reads with sparklis
eyes
Her title to a treasure in the skies"—
“Oh bless'd effect of penury and want!
The seed sown there, how vigorous in to
plant!
No soil like poverty for growth divine,
As leanest land supplies the richest wine.
Earth gives too little, giving only broad.
To nourish pride or turn the weakes head
To them the sounding jargon vs the schools
Seems, what it is, a cap and bell for tools:
The light they walk by, kindled foo".
Shews them the shortest way to go and
love:
They, strangers to the controversialso
Where dests, always foil'd, yo ""
yield,

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