Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

An Eramination of...

THE NATURE AND TENDENCY OF SOME LEGENDARY AND

DEVOTIONAL WORKS

LATELY PUBLISHED UNDER THE SANCTION OF

THE REV. J. H. NEWMAN, THE REV. DR. PUSEY,

AND

THE REV. F. OAKELEY.

BY THE REV.

[ocr errors]

BY THE REV.

Jo* c. CROSTHWAITE, M.A.

RECTOR OF ST. MARY-AT-HILL, AND ST. ANDREW HUBBARD,

LONDON.

VOL. I.

Whatsoever is not truth can be no part of

Christian religion.-SOUTH,

LONDON:
JOHN W. PARKER, WEST STRAND.

MDCCC XLVI.

[ocr errors]

PREFACE.

val

Reclass 9-23-36

The following pages, which originally appeared, in a somewhat different form, in The British Magazine, are now reprinted, with no other alterations in the text, than such as appeared necessary in order to render my meaning more distinctly understood. With the same intention, I have thought it advisable to introduce a few additional sentences; and, in one or two cases, passages from the books under consideration, which I had omitted to notice in the Magazine, have been inserted under their proper heads. These alterations, however, as I have already stated, affect my work no further than to make my meaning plainer; since, on the most careful consideration, I have found no reason to retract anything which I had originally said. On the contrary, the events of the last few weeks, have given but too sail a confirmation to the views I had taken of a movement, which has left such fearful memorials of the erroneous principles on which it was undertaken and conducted. It may be right (though I

suppose it can scarcely be necessary) to state, that the views here submitted to the public were not founded on private information relative to the state of the party, or the secret intentions of their leaders. How far

any persons among them might have connected themselves with the agents of the Jesuits and the emissaries of Rome, I had no means of knowing, when I began to write. I had no secret intelligence. I pretended to none. But, looking solely to that which it was as competent to any one else in the community to pronounce upon,-namely, their own works, and the books published, without any attempt at concealment, under their sanction or direction, it appeared to me, that no reasonable doubt could be entertained of this party having a formed and settled design to introduce popery into the church of England, and to bring the country back again once more into subjection to the Court of Rome.

It was with such views of the projects of this party that, in November, 1844, I commenced in the British Magazine, the series of papers entitled Modern Hagiology, which were continued in the Magazine, without any interruption, until December, 1845, and which form the substance of the present work.

I mention these dates merely to let my reader understand, that very much the greater portion of these volumes had been printed before Mr. Newman had declared himself a Roman Catholic, and while

many of his friends were unwilling to believe that he had any intention of taking such a step. Since that step has been taken, indeed, some of his friends have informed the public, that for the last four years he had, while outwardly conforming to the church, been in heart and intention a Roman Catholic. But, whatever be the truth of that statement—whatever authority they may have had for making it—I had no information when I wrote, to lead me to suppose that such were Mr. Newman's intentions. The view of the nature and tendencies of this movement taken in the following pages, was formed solely on a consideration of his published writings,—of books published under his sanction,—and of the works of his friends and coadjutors.

This, however, would scarcely have been considered a sufficient reason for giving these volumes to the public, had there not been other circumstances which made it appear desirable that the statements and arguments they contain should have a wider circulation, and be offered to the notice of some who may not be in the habit of seeing the Magazine in which they originally appeared.

I cannot but think, that there is something in this movement far more deserving the attention of the public, than either the fate of the movement itself, or the conduct of its leaders. There are features in this system of permanent interest; and it has been my constant anxiety and effort in this work to impress

« AnteriorContinuar »