Principles of Political Economy: Book 1, Production ; Book 2, Distribution

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Macmillan and Company, 1893
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Contenido

Production of personal or immaterial wealth
37
Classification of the various kinds of production 32 33
44
Consumption 1 Meaning of consumption objective and subjective
48
Kinds of consumption
49
The measurement of economic utility
51
Total and final or marginal utility exposition
53
Total and final utility criticism
55
Consumers rent
63
PAGE
66
Labour
72
Capital
87
Division of Labour
104
Production on a Large and Produc
122
The Law of Diminishing Return and
151
The Principle of Population
175
The Growth of Material Capital
197
The Institution of Private Property
235
1
243
Bequest and Inheritance
249
Property in Land and Compensation
256
Competition and Custom
268
Feudalism PAGE 1 On the economic as distinguished from other aspects of feudalism
290
Principal characteristics of feudalism
291
Peculiar restrictions on the ownership of land under feudalism
293
Feudalism and the towns and cities
295
Economic causes of the decay of feudalism a the increase of security
298
The decay of feudalism 6 extension of money payments
300
The decay of feudalism c changes in land laws
305
Modern Ownership of Land and Industrial Freedom 1 Outline of the argument
307
The advantages of large estates
309
Recent modifications of the economic principles of ownership of land
312
Contracts for the Hire of Land 1 Free trade in the hire of land
314
Fair or judicial rents
315
Compensation for improvements under the free trade system
318
Tenant right and free sale
319
Duration of tenancy
320
Recent changes in the English and Scottish laws affecting the hire of land
321
Conclusion
322

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Página 108 - ... if we examine, I say, all these things, and consider what a variety of labour is employed about each of them, we shall be sensible that without the assistance and co-operation of many thousands the very meanest person in a civilized country could not be provided, even according to, what we very falsely imagine, the easy and simple manner in which he is commonly accommodated.
Página 404 - Rent is that portion of the produce of the earth which is paid to the landlord for the use of the original and indestructible powers of the soil.
Página 50 - Consumption is the sole end and purpose of all production; and the interest of the producer ought to be attended to only so far as it may be necessary for promoting that of the consumer.
Página 107 - Observe the accommodation of the most common artificer or day-labourer in a civilized and thriving country, and you will perceive that the number of people of whose industry a part, though but a small part, has been employed in procuring him this accommodation, exceeds all computation. The woollen coat, for example, which covers the day-labourer, u coarse and rough as it may appear, is the produce of the joint labour of a great multitude of workmen.
Página 259 - These are the reasons which form the justification in an economical point of view, of property in land. It is seen, that they are only valid, in so far as the proprietor of land is its improver. Whenever, in any country, the proprietor, [Note omitted.] generally speaking, ceases to be the improver, political economy has nothing to say in defence of landed property, as there established. In no sound theory of private property was it ever contemplated that the proprietor of land should be merely a...
Página 369 - There is scarce a poor man in England of forty years of age, I will venture to say, who has not in some part of his life felt himself most cruelly oppressed by this ill-contrived law of settlements.
Página 121 - And the great cry that rises from all our manufacturing cities, louder than their furnace blast, is all in very deed for this, - that we manufacture everything there except men; we blanch cotton, and strengthen steel, and refine sugar, and shape pottery; but to brighten, to strengthen, to refine, or to form a single living spirit, never enters into our estimate of advantages.
Página 265 - Fourthly, by subjecting the people to the frequent visits and the odious examination of the taxgatherers it may expose them to much unnecessary trouble, vexation, and oppression; and though vexation is not, strictly speaking, expense, it is certainly equivalent to the expense at which every man would be willing to redeem himself from it.
Página 232 - We may say that the movement of progressive societies has hitherto been a movement from status to contract.
Página 186 - The immediate check may be stated to consist in all those customs and all those diseases which seem to be generated by a scarcity of the means of subsistence and all those causes independent of this scarcity, whether of a moral or physical nature, which tend prematurely to weaken and destroy the human frame.

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