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Bells call to church, but do not enter.
Rams do not pick out ravens' eyes.
Children are what they are made.
Fools invent fashions, and wise men follow them.
Great thieves hang the little ones.
Little brooks make great rivers.
The shortest follies are the best.
Many a one is good because he can do no mischief.
He sups ill who eats up all at dinner.
A deaf husband and a blind wife are always a happy couple.
No one is a prophet in his own country.
Nothing is had for nothing.
The horse that draws most is most whipped.
Where there is no sore, there needs no plaister.
Hear and see, but say nothing, if you would live in peace,
Think much, say little, write less.

While the dogs growl at each other, the wolf devours the sheep.

When other sins are old, avarice is still young.

He who waits for a dead man's shoes is in danger of going barefoot.

He that reckons without his host must reckon again,
He who does nothing, does ill.
He who looks not before, finds himself behind.
Those who go abroad by day need no lantern.
Make yourself a sheep, and the wolf will eat you.
He who sows thistles, reaps thorns.

He who holds the handle of the frying-pan, turns it as he pleases.

He had need rise early who would please every body.

PART

II.

A SELECTION OF FABLES,

SPECIALLY FITTED TO INSTRUCT AND

GRATIFY THE YOUNG.

JUPITER AND THE SHEEP.

The Sheep obliged to suffer most of all other animals, went up to Jupiter and prayed of him to lighten his evil fate.

Jupiter seemed willing, and said to the Sheep, "My innocent little creature, I see plainly that I have created you too defenceless. Now choose how I may best remedy this fault. Shall I arm your mouth with terrible teeth and your feet with claws ?"

“O no!” said the Sheep; “I will have nothing in common with those tearing animals.” Or," continued Jupiter, “shall I put poison into your bite ?” " Ah !" returned the Sheep, “the poisoned serpents are much hated."

" What then shall I do for you? I will plant horns upon your forehead, and add strength to your neck.” “ Nor this either, most gracious father ; I might, in that case, become a butting animal like the ram.” “But," said Jupiter, "you must be able to hurt others, or you will not be able to protect yourself.” “Must I !”. sighed the Sheep; “O then leave me as I am, kind father. For the power of injuring creates the desire to injure, and it is better to suffer wrong then ito commit wrong.'

Jupiter blessed the innocent Sheep, and ffrom that hour he forbore to complain.

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THE TREES CHOOSING A KING.

The Trees went forth to anoint a king over them.
And they said unto the Olive-tree, Reign thou over us.
But the Olive-tree said unto them, Should I leave my

fatness wherewith by me men honour God and man, and go to be promoted over the Trees ?

And the Trees said to the Fig-tree, Come thou and reign

over us.

But the Fig-tree said unto them, Should I forsake my sweetness and my good fruit, and go to be promoted over the Trees?

Then said the Trees unto the Vine, Come thou and reign

over us.

But the Vine said unto them, Should I leave my wine which cheeretlr the sovereign and the subject, and go to be promoted over the Trees ?

Then said all the Trees unto the Bramble, Come thou and reign over us.

And the Bramble said unto the Trees, If in truth ye anoint me king over you, then come and put your trust in my shadow; and if not, let fire come out of the Bramble and devour the Cedars of Lebanon.

THE NIGHTINGALE AND THE HAWK.

A Hawk darted down upon a Nightingale as she was singing in a wood. “Since you sing so sweetly," said he, “ how delightfully will you taste ?"

Was it in malice or in simplicity that the Hawk spoke? I cannot tell. But yesterday I heard it said : “ This lady who composes

such music, how amiable must she be?”-that, of a truth, was simplicity.

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