Agriculture and population the truest proofs of the welfare of the people: or, An essay on public happiness: Investigating the state of human nature through the several periods of history, from the earliest date to the present times, Volumen1

Portada
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 311 - I have yet many things to say unto you, but ye can not bear them now. Howbeit when he, the Spirit of truth, is come, he will guide you into all truth...
Página 426 - Man were added, the rent or benefit of the same would be double, if two, triple ; and so forward until so many Men were Planted in it, as the whole Territory could afford Food unto : For if a Man would know, what any Land is worth, the true and natural Question must be, How many Men will it feed ? How many Men are there to be fed...
Página 426 - ... awake. If there were but One man living in England, then the benefit of the whole territory could be but the livelihood of that One man : but if another man were added, the rent or benefit of the same would be double ; if two, triple ; and so forward, until so many men were planted in it, as the whole territory could afford food unto. For if a man would know what any land is worth, the true and natural question must be, How many men will it feed...
Página 427 - ... present planted upon it, with the same Labour that the said fifth part do now take where they are? For if so, then what is propounded is naturally possible. 2. It is to be enquired, What the value of the...
Página 423 - Ho\v delicate thefe men are ! and yet, if you invite them to a feaft, or offer them money, they will run for you, even to Spoletum. Such are the manners of the nobility: as to the common people, they generally fpend the night in drinking houfes, or even in the theatres, under thofe booths, the invention of which we owe to Catullus, whofiril introduced at Rome, thefe far-fetched commodities, which might better have become Capua, than the city of Romulus.
Página 427 - Scotland contain about 36 millions of acres, th,.tis four acres for every head, man, woman, and child; but the United provinces do not allow above i acre and •§• ; and England itfelf refcinding Wales, hath but 3 acres to every head, according to the prefent Bate of tillage, and hufbandry.
Página 419 - ... at. Who is he? and, whence comes he? would be circulated in ill-bred whifpers round the room. At length, however, you will attain to the honour of being known, and admitted on a familiar footing ; but yet, if, after three years of...
Página 418 - ... of the events of war, as they were of the events of the Circus ; with this difference only, that in thefe laft events, they feemed to feel themfelves more intereded. Even the emperors had, during a long time, accultomed them to this luxurious effeminacy.
Página 124 - The rcfult, therefore, is that the firft want of every fociety, muft have been the want of a polity ; and that all governments began by being no more than a fimple polity. In this inftance it particularly appears, that language ferves to explain facts, and not that facts fervc to explain the language.
Página 418 - Lucían have made us fufficiemly acquainted with the parade and extravagance peculiar to the entertainments, which were given in their times : but as Ammianus Marcellinus hath taken the pains to defcribe the manners of the Romans, during a...

Información bibliográfica