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among the heterodox portion of the friars, with whom he continued to Presbyterian body of that country. officiate till his death, in the month We heard him once say, in his own of April, 1816. In 1813, he was quaint way, “ If the Calvinistic chosen Sunday-evening Lecturer Methodists had not done more for of St. Antholin's, Watling-street, my poor country than the Welsh by the parishioners. During Mr. Bishops, the devil would have laid H.'s ministry in Blackfriars, there claim to the Principality as his own

was a small circle of intelligent undisputed territory long ago." and good people who discerned Speaking of the Welsh Socinians, and appreciated the inestimable he said once to us,

They are qualities which belonged to his as acute as Priestly himself; and mind and character; but the genesuch is the help afforded them by ral impression produced by his the devil that our very peasants

labours was by no means remarkset themselves up as oracles, and able, nor was he ever seen to adwould out-argue half the Socinian vantage, even by his most attached preachers of England.”

friends, while he remained in this Passing over many interesting important sphere. It is a fact daily features in the history of this ex- urged upon our notice and contraordinary man, we find him ar- viction, that special circumstances riving in the metropolis in October, are necessary to call forth the 1811. Here, for a time, he la- energy of particular minds, and boured under many difficulties and that upon some favourable, or perdiscouragements, and suffered pri- haps apparently accidental, occurvations which, in the present age,

rence, the usefulness of an entire do not ordinarily befal the faithful existence may materially depend. ministers of Jesus Christ. But God Upon the death of Mr. Goode, was preparing him in the furnace Mr. H. became a candidate for the of afliction for more extended use- rectory of Blackfriars, which is in falness in his church ; and those the gift of the parishioners, but who best knew the trials he was

lost it, after a zealous struggle on called to endure can and do bear the part of his friends, by a small ample testimony to the fortitude, majority. humility, and unrepining submis- In the month of March, 1817, he sion of mind, by which, at the

became the lessee of the Episcopal worst of times, he was so eminently Chapel in Long Acre, when he redistinguished. Like his blessed signed the lectureship of St. AnMaster, he was largely experi- tholin's, and devoted himself enenced in the school of sorrow; but tirely to the service of his new like him, too, though in a far hum- congregation, exerting a degree of bler degree, he was wont to say,

zeal for which his dispeptical habits "Not my will, but thine be done." but ill prepared him.

Soon after his arrival in the me- Here at once Mr. H. seemed to tropolis, he was happily appointed feel himself at home, and, like a curate to the late Rev. William father in his family, began to deGoode, A. M., rector of Black- liver himself to the large and re

spectable auditories which resorted As an instance of the absurd zeal and

to his ministry. From comparative pertinacity of some of these misguided pea. obscurity, he broke forth, almost sants, be used to refer to a Welshman, suddenly, upon the public mind, who, in contending with him for the simple and became an attraction to some humanity of Christ, stumbled upon the words of Paul, 1 Cor. xv. 47, in defence of his of the most intellectual Christians position.

in this great city. His eccentricities,

indeed, might have drawn some to We may here, perhaps, with prohis place of worship; but there is priety, introduce to the notice of reason to believe that a large pro- our readers a few imperfect speciportion of those who resorted to

mens of his theology, which have his ministry were attracted by the been preserved in short-hand, from love of truth, and by the peculiarly his lips, as delivered from the enlightened and impressive method pulpit. in which he discoursed to his peo

On the Sovereignty of God. ple about the great things of the “ The doctrine," said he, “ of the sove. kingdom of God.

reignty of Jehovah contained in the Scrip: The theology of Mr. Howels was

tures is hateful to the unrenewed mind, and

this because all who are not created anew in of a very masculine order. He

Christ Jesus are the enemies of God, and of never allowed himself to talk about

all that proceeds from him. All the good we trifles. His sermons compelled are acquainted with proceeds from the purthought, and hence his auditory poses of God in eternity. What is there that was composed of persons who sought evil does not, nor does its punishment ; the

does not emanate from this source ? Moral instruction rather than unprofitable circumstances of the latter are indeed deexcitement. There was a vein of creed, the day of judgment is fixed, but the originality about his modes of stat- torment will have its source in the bosom of ing religious truth which placed Spirit that brings all good to pass, and it

the transgressor. It is the energy of the them at a great remove from the

must have been purposed from the begin. region of common-place. He had ning.-- If so,' some one is ready to say, 'I thought deeply and vigorously on

am not to blame if I perish.' To this I an. all the vital doctrines of the gospel,

swer—the covenant of grace has nothing to

do with your perishing ; it may, indeed, be and more particularly on the seve- the innocent occasion of a more terrible de. ral subjects connected with divine struction to the enemies of God, but it is as sovereignty. With the views en- true that man's destruction is of himself, as

it is that his salvation is of God. Oh, tertained on these topics by Presi

Israel! thou hast destroyed thyself, but in dent Edwards, of America, and

me is thy help found."" the late Dr. Williams, of Rother

On submitting Reason to the Testimony of God. ham, he was intimately conversant,

" When God speaks reason, is a maniac and did not scruple, at times, to use to question instead of believing? Our protheir trains of thought and their vince is to receive the whole truth; its glories very diction. On his first arrival are such that they could emanate from no in London, he went to hear the late finite being ; they are such as could be found

no where but in Deity itself; to William Huntington, and was much

suppose

the

reverse, is as absurd as to say that light and pleased with the first two sermons ; heat emanate not from the sun, but from a but on finding him assert, on a rushlight. Here I find God's testimony clear third occasion, that election and

-the most glorious of all truths--that he reprobation emanated from the

loves poor guilty sinners ; and it is the

greatest wonder, considering his perfections, same source, he was so offended that he should have thought of any being but and grieved that he never again himself. The love that exists in God is inentered his place of worship. It

It finitely superior to the love that exists in man.

God is the only being who can find motives was a first principle with Mr. How

of action in his own bosom ; he can never els, that good, and good only, could love from motives of excelling ; the love of be the object of the divine purpose.

God is a free love : the excellency of angels said he, on a very rece

is not the cause, but the effect of his love,

The love, indeed, that embraces and preoccasion, cannot be traced to a

serves an innocent being is glorious ; but higher source than the creature.

what shall we say of that love which emElection involves in it the predes- braces a transgressor ? God must love a tination of God; reprobation in- transgressor, or nothing short of this could volves in it the predestination of

ever reach his case; and, strange as it may men and devils,"

The Pulpit."

Sin,”

. See

among the heterodox portion of the Presbyterian body of that country. We heard him once say, in his own quaint way, “ If the Calvinistic Methodists had not done more for my poor country than the Welsh Bishops, the devil would have laid claim to the Principality as his own undisputed territory long ago.” Speaking of the Welsh Socinians, he said once to us, “ They are as acute as Priestly himself; and such is the help afforded them by the devil that our very peasants set themselves up as oracles, and would out-argue half the Socinian preachers of England.” *

Passing over many interesting features in the history of this extraordinary man, we find him arriving in the metropolis in October, 1811. Here, for a time, he laboured under many difficulties and discouragements, and suffered privations which, in the present age, do not ordinarily befal the faithful ministers of Jesus Christ. But God was preparing him in the furnace of affliction for more extended usefulness in his church; and those who best knew the trials he was called to endure can and do bear ample testimony to the fortitude, humility, and unrepining submission of mind, by which, at the worst of times, he was so eminently distinguished. Like his blessed Master, he was largely experienced in the school of sorrow; but like him, too, though in a far humbler degree, he was wont to say, "Not my will, but thine be done."

Soon after his arrival in the metropolis, he was happily appointed curate to the late Rev. William Goode, A. M., rector of Black

friars, with whom he continued to officiate till his death, in the month of April, 1816. In 1813, he was chosen Sunday-evening Lecturer of St. Antholin's, Watling-street, by the parishioners. During Mr. H.'s ministry in Blackfriars, there was a small circle of intelligent and good people who discerned and appreciated the inestimable qualities which belonged to his mind and character; but the general impression produced by his labours was by no means remarkable, nor was he ever seen to ad. vantage, even by his most attached friends, while he remained in this important sphere. It is a fact daily urged upon our notice and conviction, that special circumstances are necessary to call forth the energy of particular minds, and that upon some favourable, or perhaps apparently accidental, occurrence, the usefulness of an entire existence may materially depend. Upon the death of Mr. Goode, Mr. H. became a candidate for the rectory of Blackfriars, which is in the gift of the parishioners, but lost it, after a zealous struggle on the part of his friends, by a small majority.

In the month of March, 1817, he became the lessee of the Episcopal Chapel in Long Acre, when he resigned the lectureship of St. Antholin's, and devoted himself entirely to the service of his new congregation, exerting a degree of zeal for which his dispeptical habits but ill prepared him.

Here at once Mr. H. seemed to feel himself at home, and, like a rather in his family, began to geliver himself to the large and respectable auditories which resorted to his ministry. From comparative obscurity, he broke forth, almost suddenly, upon the public mind, and became an attraction to some of the most intellectual Christians in this great city. His eccentricities,

* As an instance of the absurd zeal and pertinacity of some of these misguided pea.. sants, he used to refer to a Welshman, who, in contending with him for the simple humanity of Christ, stumbled upon the words of Paul, 1 Cor. xv. 47, in defence of his position.

indeed, might have drawn some to his place of worship; but there is reason to believe that a large proportion of those who resorted to his ministry were attracted by the love of truth, and by the peculiarly enlightened and impressive method in which he discoursed to his people about the great things of the kingdom of God.

The theology of Mr. Howels was of a very masculine order. He never allowed himself to talk about trifles. His sermons compelled thought, and hence his auditory was composed of persons who sought instruction rather than unprofitable excitement. There was a vein of originality about his modes of stating religious truth which placed them at a great remove from the region of common-place. He had thought deeply and vigorously on all the vital doctrines of the gospel, and more particularly on the several subjects connected with divine sovereignty. With the views en tertained on these topics by President Edwards, of America, and the late Dr. Williams, of Rotherham, he was intimately conversant, and did not scruple, at times, to use their trains of thought and their very diction. On his first arrival in London, he went to hear the late William Huntington, and was much pleased with the first two sermons; but on finding him assert, on a third occasion, that election and

that election and reprobation emanated from the same source, he was so offended and grieved that he never again entered his place of worship. It

chino was a first principle with Mr. Howels, that good, and good only, could be the object of the divine purpose. “ Sin," said he, on a very recent occasion, “cannot be traced to a higher source than the creature. Election involves in it the predes. tination of God; reprobation involves in it the predestination of mon and devils."

We may here, perhaps, with propriety, introduce to the notice of our readers a few imperfect specimens of his theology, which have been preserved in short-hand, from his lips, as delivered from the pulpit.*

On the Sovereignty of God. “ The doctrine,” said he,“ of the sove. reignty of Jehovah contained in the Scrip. tures is hateful to the unrenewed mind, and this because all who are not created anew in Christ Jesus are the enemies of God, and of all that proceeds from him. All the good we are acquainted with proceeds from the purposes of God in eternity. What is there that does not emanate from this source? Moral evil does not, nor does its punishment; the circumstances of the latter are indeed decreed, the day of judgment is fixed, but the torment will have its source in the bosom of the transgressor. It is the energy of the Spirit that brings all good to pass, and it must have been purposed from the beginning.- If so,' some one is ready to say, 'I am not to blame if I perish.' To this I an. swer—the covenant of grace has nothing to do with your perishing, it may, indeed, be the innocent occasion of a more terrible destruction to the enemies of God, but it is as true that man's destruction is of himself, as it is that his salvation is of God. Oh, Israel! thou hast destroyed thyself, but in me is thy help found."" On submitting Reason to the Testimony of God.

" When God speaks reason, is a maniac to question instead of believing? Our province is to receive the whole truth; its glories are such that they could emanate from no finite being ; they are such as could be found no where but in Deity itself; to suppose the reverse, is as absurd as to say that light and heat emanate not from the sun, but from a rushlight. Here I find God's testimony clear

the most glorious of all truths—that he loves poor guilty sinners ; and it is the greatest wonder, considering his perfections, that he should have thought of any being but himself. The love that exists in God is infinitely superior to the love that exists in man, God is the only being who can find motives of action in his own bosom ; he can never love from motives of excelling ; the love of God is a free love : the excellency of angels is not the cause, but the effect of his love. The love, indeed, that embraces and preserves an innocent being is glorious; but what shall we say of that love which em. braces a transgressor ? God must love a transgressor, or nothing short of this could ever reach his case ; and, strange as it may

* See “ The Pulpit."

appear, this love involves more of the holi ness of Deity in it, than the love that embraces angels. Hear the important truth; it will eventually live in the heart of every child of God, and kindle a fire purer than that of a seraph. “God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth on him might not perish, bat have eternal life.' Here is love ! --love so great that it brings Deity down from beaven to earth, for such as you and I !-and yet, remember, nothing less than this could avail us : it is all necessary, True it is, we cannot understand these truths irrespective of a revelation ; but thanks be to God for his written word! It is said in Rom. v. 8th Ferse, " But God commendeth his love to ward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.'

On receiving the Bible as a whole. "If any person were to take an extract from any particular book, and send it forth into the world, capable of being interpreted in a manner never intended by the author, every man of candour and of common sense would desire to see the whole book before he formed his opinion of the work or of the author. This ought also to be done with respect to the sacred writings. This much is their due, and cannot in justice be denied them; and this, in the name of my great Master, I deinand for them. And why should it be denied ? Is it not very strange, that men will use common sense when they are investigating any other subject, and will not bring it, along with them when they come to trial about matters of eternal con. ceros-of hcaven, hell, and an eternity of happiness or misery?

* There are evidently many particular passages of Scripture, which, when considered and taken separately, seem to have a meaning very different from other passages and from the general current of Scripture. But the truth depends not upon one passage, but upon the general agreement and union of the whole. In interpreting Scripture, one passage is to be compared with another, and with the general tenor of truth." On the Moral Perfection and Holiness of God.

“ The creating and sustaining power of God are clear, though the manner of them is incomprehensible; but there is one thing to which our attention should be supremely directed—the moral perfections of Jehovah, especially his holiness; we should feel this to be as essential an attribute as power or omniscience : God must cease to exist when he ceases to be holy. May we study this lesson by the light of truth, and the prin ciple, if properly learned, will end in prac. tice. Good and evil do not arise from any arbitrary appointment of Deity. The law that is holy, just, and good, proceeds from

a will that is holy, just, and good, and that will from an essence that is holy, just, and good; there is no fatality in the case ; every thing that proceeds from God is infinitely free and holy. The holiness of God consists in infinite love to good, and hatred to evil; and the proof of this shines in perfect glory and beauty in the person of Messiab. There are difficulties, respecting each particle of matter, so incomprehensible that a child might readily puzzle a philosopher ; but when we behold the incarnate God dying to atone for transgressions that we have committed, we discover the holiness of God at full length

-the perfect image of his own perfections in the person of his Šon. We perceive his holiness filling both law and gospel in the cha. racter of Jesus Christ; we see it in his hatred to sin, in the sufferings of an infinite person; we see it in his love to the sinner, delivering him from guilt and condemnation; the sufferings of the Saviour imply both in an equal degree. A view of God in Christ melts the heart of the most obdurate sinner; he perceives his holiness in the law and in the gospel, in his mercy and in his justice, and it makes and preserves him holy for ever."

On the Sustaining Grace of God. “While here below, man carries in his bosom a suicidal principle continually; and the holy energy of God, that preserved the angels in their first estate, is necessary to prevent this principle from evincing itself in our destruction. The believer's attention, then, should be continually directed to the sacrifice and righteousness of Jesus Christ, that his conscience may be kept in perfect peace, while the Spirit of Jesus disciplines him to oppose the might and majesty of God to every evil continually. I could soon prove that the most glorious beings above, if the Spirit were withdrawn from them, would immediately descend to their original nothingness. If this be true (and true it is), that pure beings require the exercise of the power of God, what is to preserve us in such a world as this? Suppose you were to see a spark of fire descend in the ocean, and were told that spark is to consume the waters; what would convince you of the truth of this? Nothing but facts. Now, here are factsthe grace of God taking possession of the heart of man. Man naturally possesses a will directly opposite to the will of God“enmity against God”-ignorant of the holy character of God; and yet see the power of this grace, influencing him to act diametrically opposite to his natural disposition! And bless God for this his most glorious work ! We have naturally no disposition to love and serve God, because he is a holy God. There is a most awful vacuum in the heart, which must be filled here by the regenerating grace of God, or hereafter with the destroying torments of hell.",

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