The Philosophical and Theological Works of ...

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J. Hodges, 1749
 

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Página 79 - And the times of this ignorance God winked at; but now commandeth all men every where to repent: because he hath appointed a day, in the which he will judge the world in righteousness by that man whom he hath ordained; whereof he hath given assurance unto all men, in that he hath raised him from the dead.
Página 154 - And so must the Uniformity in the Bodies of Animals, they having generally a right and a left side shaped alike, and on either side of their Bodies two Legs behind, and either two Arms, or two Legs, or two Wings before upon their Shoulders, and between their Shoulders a Neck running down into a Back-bone, and a Head upon it; and in the Head two Ears, two Eyes, a Nose, a Mouth and a Tongue, alike situated.
Página 255 - And these things being rightly dispatched, does it not appear from phenomena that there is a Being, incorporeal, living, intelligent, omnipresent, who in infinite space, as it were in his sensory, sees the things themselves intimately and thoroughly perceives them, and comprehends them wholly by their immediate presence to himself...
Página 140 - But mould they wear away, or break in pieces, the Nature of Things depending on them, would be changed. Water and Earth, compofed of old worn Particles and Fragments of Particles, would not be of the fame Nature and Texture now, with Water and Earth compofed of entire Particles in the Beginning. And...
Página 141 - Water, which is a very fluid tasteless Salt, she changes by Heat into Vapour, which is a sort of Air, and by Cold into Ice, which is a hard, pellucid, brittle, fusible Stone; and this Stone returns into Water by Heat, and Vapour returns into Water by Cold. Earth by Heat becomes Fire, and by Cold returns into Earth.
Página 191 - What I call Attraction may be perform'd by impulse, or by some other means unknown to me. I use that Word here to signify only in general any Force by which Bodies tend towards one another, whatsoever be the Cause.
Página 309 - ... explained; and probably it was to give some sort of satisfaction to this difficulty that solid orbs were introduced. The later philosophers pretend to account for it either by the action of certain vortices, as Kepler and Des Cartes', or by some other principle of impulse or attraction, as Borelli, Hooke, and others of our nation; for, from the laws of motion, it is most certain that these effects must proceed from the action of some force or other. But our purpose is only to trace out the quantity...
Página 9 - ... fearching what, or what manner of time the Spirit of Chrift which was in them did fignify, when it teftified before-hand the fufferings of Chrift, and the glory that fliould follow.
Página 141 - Lightning and Thunder, and fiery Meteors. For the Air abounds with acid Vapours fit to promote Fermentations, as appears by the rusting of Iron and Copper in it, the kindling of Fire by blowing, and the beating of the Heart by means of Respiration.
Página 8 - Then faid the Jews unto him, Thou art not yet fifty years old, and haft thou feen Abraham ? Jefus faid unto them, Verily, verily, I fay unto you, before Abraham was, I am.

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