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WBIG-EXAMINER..

of it displayed by the Examiner_his Blunders on

Foreign Affairs, and in Domestic Politics

5. The true Political Controversy then existing—the Mea-

sure of Popular Obedience and of Kingly Power-

the Falsehood of the Doctrine of Passive Obedience

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THE FREEHOLDER.

1. The Title and Design of this Work

396

2. Of His Majesty's Character

400

3. The Memoirs of a Preston Rebel .

403

4. Reasons why the British Ladies should side with the

Freeholder

407

5. Of the Love which we owe to our Country

410

6. The Guilt of Perjury

416

7. Of Party-Lies .

421

8. The Female Association

425

9. Answer of the Freeholders of Great Britain to the

Pretender's Declaration .

428

10. Arbitrary Power, exemplified in the Conduct of

Muly Ishmael, Emperor of Morocco

435

11. Subscriptions to the Female Association

440

12. The Guilt of Rebellion in general, and of the late

Rebellion in particular

.

443

13. Of those who are indifferent in a time of Re:

bellion

448

14. The Political Creed of a Tory Malecontent

450

15. Project of the Ladies for making the Fan service-

able to the Protestant Cause

454

16. On the late Act of Parliament for suspending the

Habeas Corpus Act

457

17. How Ministers of State should bear an undeserved

Reproach

461

18. Of the late French Edict for increasing the Value of

their Louis d'Ors

464

19. The unchristian Spirit of our late Party-Writings 463

20. Of the late Act of Parliament for laying Four Shil-

lings in the Pound on Land

471

21. The Birthday of Her Royal Highness the Princess

of Wales

474

22. The Character and Conversation of a Tory Fox-

hunter

478

23. A Cartel for the British Ladies, during their present

State of War

482

24. The Designs of His Majesty's Enemies impracticable 485

25. Of the Fickleness of the British Politics

488

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-Cum prostrata sopore Urget inembra quies, et mens sine pondere ludit. Petr. Though there are many authors who have written on dreams, they have generally considered them only as revelations of what has already happened in distant parts of the world, or as passages of what is to happen in future periods of time.

I shall consider this subject in another light, as dreams may give us some idea of the great excellency of a human soul, and some intimations of its independency on matter.

In the first place, our dreams are great instances of that activity which is natural to the human soul, and which it is not in the power of sleep to deaden or abate. When the man appears tired and worn out with the labours of the day, this active part in his composition is still busied and unwearied. When the organs of sense want their due repose and necessary reparations, and the body is no longer able to keep pace with that spiritual substance to which it is united, the soul exerts herself in her several faculties, and continues in the action till her partner is again qualified to bear her company. In this case dreams look like the relaxations and amusements of the soul, when she is disencumbered of her machine, her sports and recreations, when she has laid her charge asleep.

In the second place, dreams are an instance of that agility and perfection which is natural to the faculties of the mind, when they are disengaged from the body. The soul is clogged and retarded in her operations, when she acts in conjunction

VOL. IV.

B

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