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not plain, that such a doctrine as is here declared will exceedingly raise the Christian above himself, and, without impairing, nay, even while increasing his humility, will make him feel all things of earth as little, and of small interest or account, and will preserve him from the agitations of mind which they naturally occasion ?

Alas! I am not speaking of ourselves in this degenerate time, when we seem well nigh to have forfeited the Gospel gifts through our sins; but, without thinking of ourselves, surely it is not without its use to consider the high Gospel tone of thought in itself. He then, who believes that, in St. Paul's words, he is “joined to the Lord” as “one spirit,” must necessarily prize his own blessed condition, and look down upon all things, even the greatest things here below. “ Ye are of God, little children,” says the beloved disciple, “ and have overcome them; because greater is He that is in you than he that is in the world. They are of the world; ... we are of God. He that knoweth God, heareth us; he that is not of God, heareth not us."* Here is the language of saints; and hence it is that St. Paul, as feeling the majesty of that new nature which is imparted to us, addresses himself in a form of indignation to those who forget it. “What !” he says, “what! know ye not that your body is the temple of the Holy Ghost ?” As if he said, “ Can you be so mean-spirited and base-minded as to dishonour yourselves in the devil's service ? Should we not pity the man of birth, or station, or character, who degraded himself in the eyes of the world, who forfeited his honour, broke his word, or played the coward? And shall not we, from mere sense of propriety, be ashamed to defile our spiritual purity, the royal blood of the second Adam, with deeds of darkness ? Let us leave it to the hosts of evil spirits, to the haters of Christ, to eat the dust of the earth all the days of their life. Cursed are they

* 1 John iv. 6.

above all cattle, and above every beast of the field; grovelling shall they go, till they come to their end and perish. But for Christians, it is theirs to walk in the light, as children of the light, and lift up their hearts, as looking out for Him who went away, that He might return."

For the same reason, Christians are called upon to think little of the ordinary objects which men pursue, wealth, luxury, distinction, popularity, and power. It was this negligence about the world, which brought upon them in primitive times the reproach of being indolent. Their heathen enemies spoke truly; indolent and indifferent they were about temporal matters. If the goods of this world came in their way, they were not bound to decline them; nor would they forbid others in the religious use of them; but they thought them vanities, the toys of children, which serious men let drop. Nay, St. Paul betrays the same feeling as regards our temporal callings and states generally. After discoursing about them, suddenly he breaks off as if impatient of the multitude of words, “But this I say, brethren,” he exclaims, “ the time is short."

Hence, too, the troubles of life gradually affect the Christian less and less, as his view of his own real blessedness, under the Dispensation of the Spirit, grows upon him ; and even though persecuted, to take an extreme case, he knows well that, through God's inward presence, he is greater than those who for the time have power over him, as Martyrs and Confessors have often shown.

And in like manner, he will be calm and collected under all circumstances; he will make light of injuries, and forget them from mere contempt of them. He will be undaunted, as fearing God more than man; he will be firm in faith and consistent, as "seeing Him that is invisible:" not impatient, who has no self-will ; not soon disappointed, who has no hopes; not anxious, who has no fears; nor dazzled, who has no ambition ; nor bribed, who has no desires.

more glorious his visions ; so much the graver, the more sub-! dued, the more serene must be his worship and his confession. Who was so intoxicated with Divine love as St. John ? who so overcharged with the Spirit ? yet what language can be calmer than when he says, “Behold what manner of love the Father hath bestowed upon us, that we should be called the sons of God! ..... When He shall appear, we shall be like Him, for we shall see Him as He is ?!!* And · who was possessed with a more burning zeal than St. Paul ?

yet observe his injunction to the spiritually-gifted Corin- ! thians : “Let all things be done unto edifying; the spirits of the prophets are subject to the prophets; for God is not the author of confusion, but of peace. ... Let all things be done decently and in order.”+ And in like manner, in anticipation of Gospel perfection, we read of the impressive gravity and saintly bearing of Samuel and his prophetic company, when Saul came to Ramah; while Saul's extravagance when he came within the Divine influence, prefigures to us the wayward and unpeaceful behaviour of heretical sects in every age, who, in spite of whatever tokens they may bear of the presence of a good spirit among them, yet, whether they preach or pray, are full of tumult and violence, and cause wild alarm or fierce ecstasy, and even strange affections of body, convulsions and cries, in their converts or hearers.

But if gravity and sobriety were seen even in that time, when the heirs of promise were under age, as children submitted to a schoolmaster, and when holy David “ danced before the Lord with all his might, leaping and dancing before the Lord;"I much more is the temper of the Christian Church high and heavenly, noble, majestic, calm, and untroubled. For it is the state of heart imparted by the

* 1 John iii. 1, 2.

1 1 Cor. xiv. 26. 32, 33. 40. 2 Sam. vi. 14. 16.

Divine Paraclete, who stands by us to strengthen us and raise our stature, and, as it were, to straighten our limbs, and to provide us with the wings of Angels, wherewith to mount heavenward ; by Him who takes possession of us, and dwells in us, and makes us His agents and instruments, nay, in a measure, His confidants and counsellors, till we “comprehend the breadth and length, and depth and height, and know the love of Christ, which passeth knowledge, that we may be filled with all the fulness of God."* Religious men, knowing what great things have been done for them, cannot but grow greater in mind in consequence. We know how power and responsibility change men in matters of this world. They become more serious, more vigilant, more circumspect, more practical, more decisive; they fear to commit mistakes, yet they dare more, because they have a consciousness of liberty and of power, and an opportunity for great successes. And thus the Christian, even in the way of nature, without speaking of the influence of heavenly grace upon him, cannot but change from the state of children to that of men, when he understands his own privileges. The more he knows and fears the gift committed to him, so much the more reverent is he towards himself, as being put in charge with it.

Consider the language in which our Lord and His Apostles describe the gift—“If a man love Me,” says Christ, shortly after the text, “ he will keep My words, and My Father will love him, and we will come unto him, and make Our abode with him.” Again, in St. Paul's words, “ Ye are the temple of the Living God; as God hath said, I will dwell in them and walk in them.” Again, “Know ye not that your body is the temple of the Holy Ghost, which is in you, which ye have of God, and ye are not your own ?!! And St. John, “Whosoever shall confess that Jesus is the Son of God, God dwelleth in him and he in God.”+ Is it * Eph. iij. 18, 19, 2 Cor. vi. 16. 1 Cor. vị 19, 1 John iv. 15.

not plain, that such a doctrine as is here declared will exceedingly raise the Christian above himself, and, without impairing, nay, even while increasing his humility, will make him feel all things of earth as little, and of small interest or account, and will preserve him from the agitations of mind which they naturally occasion ?

Alas! I am not speaking of ourselves in this degenerate time, when we seem well nigh to have forfeited the Gospel gifts through our sins; but, without thinking of ourselves, surely it is not without its use to consider the high Gospel tone of thought in itself. He then, who believes that, in St. Paul's words, he is “joined to the Lord” as “one spirit," must necessarily prize his own blessed condition, and look down upon all things, even the greatest things here below. “Ye are of God, little children,” says the beloved disciple, “and have overcome them ; because greater is He that is in you than he that is in the world. They are of the world; ... we are of God. He that knoweth God, heareth us; he that is not of God, heareth not us.”* Here is the language of saints; and hence it is that St. Paul, as feeling the majesty of that new nature which is imparted to us, addresses himself in a form of indignation to those who forget it. “What !" he says, “ what! know ye not that your body is the temple of the Holy Ghost ?As if he said, “ Can you be so mean-spirited and base-minded as to dishonour yourselves in the devil's service ? Should we not pity the man of birth, or station, or character, who degraded himself in the eyes of the world, who forfeited his honour, broke his word, or played the coward? And shall not we, from mere sense of propriety, be ashamed to defile our spiritual purity, the royal blood of the second Adam, with deeds of darkness ? Let us leave it to the hosts of evil spirits, to the haters of Christ, to eat the dust of the earth all the days of their life. Cursed are they

* 1 John iv. 6.

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