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ROWLAND HUNTER, AND R. J. KENNETT, GREAT QUEEN STREET.

1837.

CAMBRIDGE:

PRINTED BY FOLSOM, WELLS, AND THURSTON.

CONTENTS

187

ART. V. - 1. Geschichtliche und statistische Nachrichten über

die Universitäten im preussischen Staate. Von WILHELM

DIETERICI.

KIN, D. D.

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THE

CHRISTIAN EXAMINER.

No. LXXVI.

THIRD SERIES- No. VII.

SEPTEMBER, 1836.

ART. 1.- The Character and Institutions of Moses, considered

with particular Reference to their Bearing on the Science of Government and Civil Liberty.

When we see it stated, that some of the early colonists of New England determined to govern themselves for a time by the Hebrew laws, many are strongly tempted to smile at their simplicity. But the colonists knew what they were doing. They were right, in supposing that the Hebrew institutions were intended for a state of affairs very similar to their own. Some parts of the ancient code, some of its local provisions, would not answer for modern times; but with some abatement, principally, however, of laws which could not possibly be brought into use and action, the Hebrew constitution was as well suited, as any that could be devised, for the infant colonies of our country. Those who ridicule the measure, are probably not aware, that the Hebrews lived under a government of laws and not of men. It was the spirit of freedom which ran through those institutions, that recommended them to the strong hearts of our fathers. They saw, what many others who read the Bible never saw, that it was the constitution of a free people.

A government of laws and not of men! How much the institutions of the United States have been admired because these words describe them! The friends of freedom, in all the civilized world, are looking upon us with deep and anxious interest, because they believe that our government is the

- 30 s. Vol. III. NO. I. 1

VOL. XXI.

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