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that the “Dowie Dens” as compiled by but contains the coupletSir Walter Scott "was a mixed, there

But only saw the cloud o' night, fore incongruous, reference to the inci.

Or heard the roar of Yarrow, dent of the earlier ballad, and to a later incident in the relations of the families which Logan introduced into his song of Scott of Thirlestane and Scott of of “The Braes of Yarrow," published in Tuschielaw.” The incident of one man 1770. Professor Veitch descants on the fighting nine, being killed treacher- epithet "scroggy braes” with much relously, and thrown into the Yarrow, is ish of its appropriateness. "Scroggy," the same in both versions, but the posi. he says, “is better than all. This extion of the single man who fought is es presses exactly the look of the stunted sentially different.

trees and bushes on the braes of YarIn the introduction to the “Dowie row-two and a half centuries ago, Dens” in the “Minstrelsy” Sir Walter when the forest was decaying—such as Scott alludes to the hero of the ballad only a native minstrel could have seen as being a brave knight named Scott, or felt. “The scroggy braes'-this was of Kirkhope or Oakwood Castle, called never said before in Scottish ballad or the Baron of Oakwood, and says that minstrel song-yet it is so true and so according to tradition he was treacher- ancient!" Whether this old ballad setously murdered by the brother either tles the vexed question of the heroship of his wife or of his betrothed bride. In of the ballad, and whether the heroine the older version as furnished by was wife or betrothed, seems to us a Welsh the first stanzas dispel this illu- small matter, but to have recovered an sion:

early version of so favorite a theme,

and one immortalized by the associaAt Dryhope lived a lady fair,

tions cast round it by Scott and WordsThe fairest flower in Yarrow; And she refused nine noble men

worth, is a matter genuine congratuFor a servan'lad in Gala.

lation, while the lights thrown on the

various versions and their details are Her father said that he should fight exceptionally interesting and instrucThe nine lords all to-morrow;

tive. And he that should the victor be,

Would get the Rose of Yarrow. Here, at once, is the reason for the unequal contest, and also for the conduct of the lady's brother, who sprang upon

From The Athenæum. the young man from behind a bush

A POETIC TRIO. when he was fighting the nine lords or

It occurs to me that now, when we “lairds,” and slew him treacherously. have so recently lost the last of the three Then the body was thrown ignomini- women whose names were once so often ously into the Yarrow, and the lady re linked together by the reading publiccounts her dream:

Dora Greenwell, Christina Rossetti, anil

Jean Ingelow (I am naming them in the The lady said, “I dreamed yestreen, I fear it bodes some sorrow,

order in which they died)—you migiit That I was pu’in' the heather green,

like to print some of the letters which On the scroggy braes o' Yarrow."

passed between them before they had (Welsh's version.)

met each other face to face, after which The older ballad omits the beautiful mate. Their first meeting took place

they naturally became much more intistanza given by Herd in bis fragment,

some time not very long after the dates and embodied by Scott:

of the following letters. I must premise

that these ladies lived in the days when O gentle wind that bloweth south From where my love repaireth,

the cry, "Go spin, ye jades, go spin!" Convey a kiss from his dear mouth,

was still not infrequently heard if a And tell me how he fareth,

woman wished to devote herself to any

branch of art, and all three were much, and really think they are likely to anxious to show that though they wrote reach the class for which they were writpoetry they were none the less proficient ten. The poor men here are all of the

seafaring class, or. I should have given in the usual womanly crafts. Miss Greenwell had challenged Miss those verses away. Do you know that I

have finished a bag for you? I shall send Rossetti to produce a creditable sample it, I think, by railway, for my brother is of skilled needlework. Dora Green- coming to-morrow as usual, and he will well's own Meisterstück was a well

convey it as far as London. The pattern made workbag. This is Miss Rossetti's is of my own invention! Is the kettleletter acknowledging the gift:

holder worked yet? I shall be so proud of it. When I next see Miss Rossetti I shall ask

for proof that she can do hemming and 5, Upper Albany St., London, N. W. 31 December, 1863.

sewing. . . . It is a pleasure to me that

you like those little stories. They have My Dear Miss Greenwell,-Your very

not much in them, but it was an amusekind gift reproaches me for so late an ac

ment to me to write them; writing for knowledgement, but indeed I have been so

children is so completely its own reward; busy as to feel excused for not having till

it obliges one to be simple and straightfornow thanked you for it. Even now I have

ward, and clears away some of the mystinot made myself acquainted with its contents, but I must soon do so, having just and which are a mere luxury. They never

cal fancies in which one is apt to indulge, succeeded in clearing off a small batch of

do us any good, and I am often humilated work for the S. P. C. K.

by meeting with sensible fellow creatures The last day of the year suggests more

who ask me what some of them mean. good wishes than I venture to express to

There has been so much leisure you. Thank you for the friendly welcome

here that my new volume is all but finacorded to my carte. I should be truly

ished. It is, however, not to be printed pleased to possess yours; but will not bore

yet. I am, believe me, you with too urgent a request, as probably

Very affectionately yours, so many persons are in my case. What think you of Jean Ingelow, the

JEAN INGELOW. wonderful poet? I have not yet read the volume, but reviews with copious extracts Miss Ingelow's workbag was a beautihave made me aware of a new eminent ful piece of craftsmanship. Garlands of name having arisen among us. I want to flowers, done from those to be found in know who she is, what she is like, where almost any pretty and well-cared-for she lives. All I have heard is an uncer- garden, were wrought with narrow tain rumor that she is aged twenty-one, china ribbon of all colors and shades and and is one of three sisters resident with their mother. A proud mother, I should blendings on a ground of black cloththink. If our dear Scotts move away al

no work of the kind could have been bettogether from the North, I fear my pros

ter executed. Here my knowledge of pect of making your personal acquaint- this great sewing competition comes to ance must dwindle to the altogether vague. an end. I have even forgotten whether Your kindness, however, has made us no Miss Rossetti's piece of work was ever strangers, even should we never meet- sent, but my impression is that it was or, rather, never meet here; for on the last not.

M. day of the year the separations and meetings of time should not alone be thought of.

Yours cordially,
CHRISTINA ROSSETTI.

From The London Standard. Miss Ingelow must have been drawn

THE EARLY RISING FALLACY. into this competition very soon after the date of this letter, for on the 9th of Feb- and well that early rising is one of the

Of late years it has been argued wisely ruary she wrote:

chief causes of lunacy. Liers in bed in all

ages have contended that it is one of the 6, Denmark Place, Hastings. My Dear Miss Greenwell,I have for many effects of lunacy; there was not some time been anxious to write to you,

the smallest doubt about the mental both to thank you for your kind note and

condition of a man who rose at dayfor the poems you sent me. I like them break from choice, but modern science

has discovered that it is not only an of the early riser in this interesting effect but a cause of insanity. Liers stage of incipient madness is highly ediabed will be overjoyed to hear that fying. It is of him and his ilk that the those who rise at four all suffer the psalmist speaks when he says, "Behold, same fate as those who

as wild asses of the desert go they forth Use fusees:

to their work, rising betimes for their All grow by slow degrees

prey.” Having risen with the sun, the Brainless as chimpanzees,

Morning Pharisee has reached by breakMeagre as lizards;

fast time a sublime altitude from which Go mad and beat their wives, he gazes down at the saner beings Plunge, after shocking lives,

around him with a lofty contempt. He Razors and carving knives

imagines that because he has secured Into their gizzards.

the dewdrop before the lark has had a Such is the terrible fate of the rash indi- chance to plan the larceny, he is necesvidual who would dare to rise before the sarily a poet of the first water-an exsun. The overweening conceit of the alted being above the littleness of exman who rises at daybreak has long postulating with the man who appears been a source of wonder among obsery when the coffee is cold. After all, what ant psychologists, but now it is has he achieved? A dewdrop, wet feet, longer a mystery; it is explained by the and a morbid craving for the picturnew early rising and insanity theory. esque and sensational in nature. In Surely the conceited Pharisee, who these days of cranks and crazes, there struts like the cock he helps to the gar are thousands of crack-brained people den wall, is more deserving of pity than who would barter away three hours of contempt, for are not his symptoms pre- healthy sleep for a dewdrop and its unmonitory of the madness, incipient as desirable train of evils. No one wonyet in him, but freely promised in its ders at this, it is so common; the wonder fullness by the medical faculty to all is that these people have never found those who waste the best hours of the their way, until quite recently, into the day drinking the intoxicating morning treatises on the morbid pathological conair on an empty stomach? The picture ditions of the brain.

no

The Tsetse-Fly.-It used to be believed in countless numbers. Under another that the tsetse-fly disease, that plague microscope a drop of fresh blood was of African travel, was due to a poison shown with the parasites actually alive natural to the tsetse-fly, as the acrid and wriggling in disgusting activity. secretions of ants or hornets are natural For comparison there were shown, alive to those insects. A group of English and dead, similar parasites found infestbaeteriologists have been investigating ing the blood of sewer rats in this counthe disease, and it is now known that try. Unfortunately, these parasites apthe tsetse-fly is the mere bearer of the pear not to affect the health of the rats. disease. The fly itself is the prey of a The exhibition was a striking demonminute animal organism, and when it stration of the modern knowledge of sucks the blood of an ox, some of these diseases; most of these are now seen to parasites enter the wound and multiply be phases of the struggle for existence incredibly in the blood vessels. Speci- between small organisms like microbes mens of the blood of affected animals and large organisms like man and the have been shown under high magnifica- other vertebrates. And the victory is tion, and the tiny, eel-like parasites, not not always with the strong.-Saturday larger than blood-corpuscles, are seen Review.

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I. JOB AND THE "Faust,"

Quarterly Review, II. IN NATURE'S WAGGISH Mood. By Paul

Heyse. Translated for The Living Age

by Harriet Lieber Cohen. Part II. III. TWENTY YEARS OF CYCLING. and E. R. Pennell,

Fortnightly Review,
IV. A VILLAGE SOVEREIGN,

Macmillan's Magazine,
V. THE ORLEANS PRETENDERS.
Albert D. Vandam,

Contemporary Rerier,
VI. A REMINISCENCE OF TENNYSON.

Ву
William Knight,

Blackwood's Magazine, .
VII. OLD Fiction. By Augustine Birrell, Speaker, .
VIII. PHOTOGRAPHY IN NATURAL COLORS, Knowledge,
IX. BACHELOR SEALS,

Spectator,
X. A LOBSTER'S TOILET,

London Fireside,

By

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READINGS FROM AMERICAN

READINGS FROM NEW BOOKS: MAGAZINES:

ON THE EBB TIE.

By Mrs. EAST AND WEST FACE TO FACE, . 753

Oliphant,

765 THE NEW SCIENCE,

755

SKY-Gazing. By Charles M. Skiu-
CRITICISM IN AMERICA,

756
ner,

767 ENGLISH HOSPITALITY IN THE NORTHWEST, 757 The HOUSE OF DREAMS,

770 ARE THE Rich GROWING RICHER A BREAKWATER OF BARBARISM. AND THE POOR POORER ? 759 By H. D. Traill,

773 THE RESPONSIBILITIES OF TIE CIVIL ENGINEER, 761 BOOKS OF THE MONTH,

776 THE HISTORICAL NOVEL,

762 THE UNITED STATES AT THE ExPOSITION OF 1900,

762

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Look now before And not behind thee; do not fret

The past is o'er.

Thy pain is sore And thou hast cause for sorrow, yet

Grieve thou no more.

Close Memory's doorThat day is dead, that sun has set

The past is o'er.

The Son of God, the Christ, the crucified, Whom thou hast all thy life contemnel,

denied, And thrust asunder? Yea, 'tis even He. "Behold I stand and knock." Where

knocking? See The closed door thick-set with thorns of

pride, And choked with idle weeds from side to

side: It is the door of thine impiety. “Behold I stand and knock. If any hear My voice and open" (Foolish soul, to thee He speaketh all night long. Dost thou not

fear To keep Him waiting there so wearily ?) “I will come in." (0 God, my God, how

near!) "Yea, and will sup with him, and he with

Me."

EDWARD CRACROFT LEFROY,

There are in store For thee still happy days. Forget!

Grieve thou no more.

Smile as of yore-
No longer let thine eyes be wet.

The past is o'er.

Grieve thou no more! Chambers's Journal

M. H. IV.

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