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be the great argument by which you endeavour to gain the hearts of your children to the Redeemer, and the source to which you direct the members of your household for patience and comfort under all domestic trials. Speak of it when you visit the afflicted, and point out the resignation which it teaches, and the peace which it yields. Exhibit to those who are tempted to des. pair, the riches of its merit, and the efficacy of its power ; and let this be the chief means which you employ to prepare and to fortify the dying for their departure. The gloom of death can only be brightened by the beam that shines from Calvary. And do not complain that you must quit any scene of ease or enjoyment for this service. Abasement for Jesus is honour, labour for him is pleasure, and loss for him is gain.

Anticipate your own departure, and be thankful for every monitor which reminds that

you must soon go home. Doat not on objects which you are so soon to leave; fret not at difficulties which will soon be over; and complain not of burdens which you shall so soon lay down. Act as those who belong to another world, and let your conversation be in heaven. Rejoice in the friends, but above all, in the Saviour

you

have there. You shall soon behold his face in righteous

address him in praise and prayer, and your accents are low and feeble, and often do you attempt to lift your hearts to him in sighs and groavs which cannot be uttered; but then you shall talk with him in the song of Moses and the Lamb, and in the kindest and sweetest intercourse of friendship read his heart, and lay open to him your own. When you quit this world, it will not be like Israel leaving Egypt for the wilderness, but like Christ departing for paradise; and the sentence with which you are now dismissed

you

Now you

ness.

from his table will be that with which he sends you away from earth, “ Go in peace."

ADDRESS XXVIII.

JOHN XI. 35.

66 Jesus wept."

What a memorable circumstance in the history of our Lord! With great propriety have those who divid. ed the New Testament into verses made a single verse of this, that the reader may pause and wonder at the tenderness of the Saviour's compassion. On this verse the mourner loves to meditate, many a tear has fallen over it, and many a blessing has been invoked on that head and heart from which these melting symptoms of pity came. This view of our Saviour's tenderness is well adapted to encourage his timid and sorrowful disciples to approach to him at his table, and to implore his mercy

and

grace ; and it is in this ordinance that he delights to manifest the kindness and the power of his sympathy in healing the broken in heart, and in binding up their wounds.

These tears of Jesus proceeded from the genuine grief of a kind and melting heart. There are some who have tears at command, and who can weep bitterly when their hearts are very little affected ; but, that Jesus was deeply moved, is evident from his groan. ing in spirit, and it was mental emotion that filled his eyes with tears. The heart which no danger could intimidate was feelingly alive to the impressions of pity; and though he experienced more than any one

ever did of that ungrateful and injurious treatment which has so often soured the generous and feeling breast, he beheld the miserable with unabated interest, and re« lieved them with undiminished liberality.

These tears were copious. This is plain from the remark which was made by some of the spectators, “ Behold how he loved him.” They saw in his tears an attachment to the dead uncommonly tender, and therefore it could not be a slight or feeble expression of sorrow. Joy shed few gleams over his countenance, and the Man of Sorrows was to be known by the tokens of grief. At the same time we must not suppose that there was aught that was excessive, or any indication of outrageous passion in our Lord's sorrow. It unfits him for no part of his duty; the heart that is throb. bing with strong emotion is possessed in patience, and while his eyes run down with water, he waits for the salvation of God.

In this sorrow of our Lord there was no ostentation. Nothing is more disgusting than parade in grief; but it must be remarked, that, to assume and to maintain the appearance of unconcern in the scene of mourning, may be hurtful and offensive to those whom our sympathy might sooth, is an indignity to the memory of the departed, and a contempt of those lessons of more tality which both wisdom and piety require that we should feel. It was necessary that our Lord's grief should be manifested for the comfort of the mourners, and for the trial of the hearts of the spectators; but beyond this he had no wish to exhibit his sorrow. The affectation and vain glory which court applause for any quality whatever, were utter strangers to his meek and lowly mind.

How amiable was Jesus in this sorrow! Philosophy delights to exhibit its sages, and war its heroes, as supe.

rior to all the softer passions, and stern and unmoved amidst the agitation of others; but the Gospel repreșents him who is the wisdom of God, and the power of God, as possessing all the gentler dispositions, and as bearing to the scene of sorrow a kind and melting heart. Such a character deserves to be loved in the highest degree, and the more it is studied the more amiable it appears.

But let your meditations be turned to the causes of these tears. He wept from friendship to Lazarus. The various and endearing expressions of this man's regard crowded on his mind, and could not but deeply affect so grateful a heart. He thought of the agony through which Lazarus had passed, and of the pangs he had felt at not seeing him ere he died. Such thoughts as these might pass through the mind of Lazarus in his illness: “ If Christ were here he would relieve me if it was for my good, and with him by my side, I could die in peace. My beloved sisters, it is his hand which I wish to close these eyes, and to his care I desire to commend you in my last hour." But: Lazarus dies while the Comforter is far away; and Jesus felt that the face which used to meet him with. smiles was now pale and ghastly, that dark and dismal was the mansion where friendship spread his couch and prepared his table, and that the companion who leaned on his bosom now lay cold and senseless in his. tomb.

Our Lord might weep also when he thought of the scenes. to which he was to return. His resurrection would be a blessing to his sisters, but it would bring him back to a world of sorrow and danger, where the malice of his enemies would seek to destroy him, and where he must be subjected to many anxieties and fears. He knew that he had again to pass through

ever did of that ungrateful and injurious treatment which has so often soured the generous and feeling breast, he beheld the miserable with unabated interest, and relieved them with undiminished liberality.

These tears were copious. This is plain from the remark which was made by some of the spectators, “ Behold how he loved him.” They saw in his tears an attachment to the dead uncommonly tender, and therefore it could not be a slight or feeble expression of sorrow. Joy shed few gleams over his countenance, and the Man of Sorrows was to be known by the tokens of grief. At the same time we must not suppose that there was aught that was excessive, or any indication of outrageous passion in our Lord's sorrow. It unfits him for no part of his duty; the heart that is throbbing with strong emotion is possessed in patience, and while his eyes run down with water, he waits for the salvation of God.

In this sorrow of our Lord there was no ostentation. Nothing is more disgusting than parade in grief; but it must be remarked, that, to assume and to maintain the appearance of unconcern in the scene of mourning, may be hurtful and offensive to those whom our sympathy might sooth, is an indignity to the memory of the departed, and a contempt of those lessons of more tality which both wisdom and piety require that we should feel. It was necessary that our Lord's griet should be manifested for the comfort of the mourners, and for the trial of the hearts of the spectators; but beyond this he had no wish to exhibit his sorrow. The affectation and vain glory which court applause for any quality whatever, were utter strangers to his meek and lowly mind.

How amiable was Jesus in this sorrow! Philosophy delights to exhibit its sages, and war its heroes, as supe.

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