Higher Lessons in English: A Work on English Grammar and Composition : in which the Science of the Language is Made Tributary to the Art of Expression : a Course of Practical Lessons Carefully Graded, and Adapted to Every Day Use in the School-room

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Clark & Maynard, 1883 - 282 páginas
The aim of this work is to make the science of the language, of which all the essentials are thoroughly presented, tributary to the art of expression. Every principle unfolded in the "Hints," and every idiom, common construction, and form, learned by the pupil in the analysis and parsing of the wide range of sentences given, is fixed in memory and, above all, in practice by varied and exhaustive drill in composition. The pupil is constantly stimulated to the attractive labor of composing sentences, arranging and rearranging their parts, contracting, expanding, punctuating, and criticizing them -- the analysis furnishing him materials for the synthesis, and the synthesis supplementing the analysis. Even if the study of grammar were only to Lodge in the memory the facts and principles of the language, we contend that this could be done only by work and composition -- this, and this only, can make them permanent possessions. The first half of the book is devoted to "The Sentence and the Parts of Speech;" the next thirty pages to "Parts of Speech Subdivided;" the next seventy to "Modifications of the Parts of Speech;" and the remaining thirty to composition. - Preface.

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Página 238 - To him who in the love of Nature holds Communion with her visible forms, she speaks A various language ; for his gayer hours She has a voice of gladness, and a smile And eloquence of beauty, and she glides Into his darker musings, with a mild And healing sympathy, that steals away Their sharpness ere he is aware.
Página 242 - To sit on rocks, to muse o'er flood and fell, To slowly trace the forest's shady scene, Where things that own not man's dominion dwell, And mortal foot hath ne'er or rarely been ; To climb the trackless mountain all unseen, With the wild flock that never needs a fold ; Alone o'er steeps and foaming falls to lean ; This is not solitude; 'tis but to hold Converse with Nature's charms, and view her stores unroll'd.
Página 241 - The sober herd that low'd to meet their young, The noisy geese that gabbled o'er the pool, The playful children just let loose from school...
Página 241 - That orbed maiden with white fire laden, Whom mortals call the moon, Glides glimmering o'er my fleece-like floor By the midnight breezes strewn ; And wherever the beat of her unseen feet, Which only the angels hear, May have broken the woof of my tent's thin roof, The stars peep behind her and peer ; And I laugh to see them whirl and flee Like a swarm of golden bees, When I widen the rent in my wind-built tent, Till the calm rivers, lakes, and seas, Like strips of the sky fallen through me on high,...
Página 98 - To assume a pleasing shape; yea, and perhaps Out of my weakness and my melancholy, As he is very potent with such spirits, Abuses me to damn me. I'll have grounds More relative than this: the play's the thing Wherein I'll catch the conscience of the king.
Página 72 - Is this the part of wise men engaged in a great and arduous struggle for liberty? Are we disposed to be of the number of those who having eyes see not, and having ears hear...
Página 257 - gainst that season comes Wherein our Saviour's birth is celebrated, The bird of dawning singeth all night long...
Página 258 - But, look, the morn, in russet mantle clad, Walks o'er the dew of yon high eastern hill...
Página 240 - WHEN I consider how my light is spent, Ere half my days, in this dark world and wide, And that one talent which is death to hide Lodged with me useless, though my soul more bent To serve therewith my Maker, and present My true account, lest he returning chide, ' Doth God exact day-labor, light denied ?
Página 242 - Be it a weakness, it deserves some praise, We love the play-place of our early days ; The scene is touching, and the heart is stone That feels not at that sight, and feels at none.

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