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rank of scholars. His intellect, learning, and eloquence had a wonderful attraction for all who heard him.

He soon saw work enough to be done, and earnestly assumed the task. He must reform the evil practices of the Romish Church; for he loved the church of his birth too well to see it in error. He must attack 'the barbarism then prevailing in the university,' and join in reviving the study of languages and learned antiquity. The classics must not crowd out the Bible. Philosophy must give way to religion. Therefore he began at the only point where a reformation can properly begin. He went to the heart of the Bible, so that it might go to the heart of man.

No man was more captivating in his artless, earnest, and familiar ways of teaching. Serious in the pulpit, he was genial with his students. 'He loves me exceedingly,' wrote one of them to his friend Zwingle. 'Full of candour and kindness, he often sings, prays, disputes, and laughs at the follies of the world with me.' Thus he drew a great number of disciples, from almost every country, to sit at his feet. They saw that he passed quite as much time in the churches as in his study, and were likely to imitate his devotion. Because the Church was in error, he did not abandon it; for if the ship was in a storm, and the officers drunk, there was all the better reason for every sailor to be at the post of duty and of danger. He regarded himself as a child in the Church, rather than a doctor over it; and, because willing to search, he was certain to find the truth which would save.

Lefevre was a reformer before the Reformation. He protested against error before there was any system of Protestantism. Five years must yet pass before Luther would nail his theses to the door of the old church in Wittemberg. Luther had but just found the chained Bible in the convent of Erfurth, and had not heard the good Staupitz say, ' If thou wouldst be really converted, follow not these mortifications and penances. Love Him who first loved you. God is not against thee, but thou art averse to God. Remember that Christ came hither for the pardon of sins. Cast thyself into the arms of the Redeemer. Trust in Him, in the righteousness of His life, in the expiatory sacrifice of His death.' Could Lefevre have heard such words, he would have found much sooner the treasure which he sought on the shores of truth.

In the year 1510, Luther was on his way to Rome, to witness its abominations, and William Farel was on the way to Paris to study in the university, and to find in Lefevre a friend among strangers, a guide to the truth, and a father in Christ; for, by the private light of this man, the young provincial was to make sure his landing upon the Eternal Rock of salvation.

On the walls of most Romish churches are hung pictures of different scenes in the sufferings and death of our Lord. The worshippers begin at the first, and pass around to the last, kneeling before each one, and repeating the words of their penance or prayers. These kneeling-places are called stations on the way of the cross. To make the circuit is a pilgrimage.

William Farel had not come to Paris to stroll through the streets, nor to lock himself up in his room, and pore night and day over his books. He was a close student; but he did not neglect his religious devotions. He took time for a regular attendance at church, and made it a matter of conscience to visit the stations along the way of the cross. What a privilege to the young villager to guide! He read books, bowed to images, adored relics, invoked the saints, kept the fasts and festivals, carried his reverence for Mary to a superstitious extreme, and yet all proved worse than in vain. It was sending him to the brambles, under a delusion that from them he would gather grapes.

In his severe mental sufferings he learned one piece of good news. It was, that the ' holy father, the Pope,' was willing to allow the Old and New Testaments to be called the Holy Bible. Thanks to his holiness for this concession! If he had gone further and said, with one of the English martyrs, 'No writings are holy but the Bible,' it would have settled an important question in the anxious minds of hundreds, who, like young Farel, knew not which to believe—Christ or the Pope. That question was, Which shall we follow: the word of God, or the word of the Church? Farel thought that since the Pope acknowledged the great good book to be the Holy Bible, he might read it for himself. Surely the Pope and the apostles must agree in their teachings! But as he read the sacred page, he was amazed at seeing how they disagreed, and how different everything in Romanism was from the pure Christianity of the New Testament. Where was the mass taught in the Bible? Where prayer to the saints? Where the adoration of relics? Where the worship of the Virgin Mary? Where confession to priests? Where the paying of money for a pardon? Where purgatory? Where salvation by an endless round of mere works? Certainly not in the Bible. It taught repentance instead of penances; faith in the Crucified, rather than the adoration of the cross; prayer to Jesus, and not to the saints; and love to God, rather than the fear of the Pope. In its light he could was not hoping for a rich benefice, nor preparing to fleece some flock over which he might be placed, nor dreaming of the vicious life then led by so many of the priests. A soul like his was above loving Popery for money, or for power, or for indulgence in sin. In his view the Pope sat on a throne of God, and ruled in the place of Christ . To obey and worship him as Christ was a part of salvation. If any one said aught that was ill of the 'holy Pontiff,' he would 'gnash his teeth like a furious wolf,' and was ready to call down the lightnings of heaven 'to overwhelm the guilty wretch with utter ruin and confusion.'

'What do you believe?' we presume to be asked of him, by some student who has caught up certain sarcastic remarks of Erasmus about the follies of Romanism. 'Do you really believe that a wafer is converted into the very body of Christ?'

'I believe,' said Farel, 'in the cross, in pilgrimages, images, vows, and relics. What the priest holds in his hands, puts into the box, and then shuts it up, eats, and gives others to eat, is my only true God; and to me there is no other, either in heaven or upon earth.'

Still he was not satisfied. His spirit hungered, his soul found no rest . Everything was going from bad to worse. The study of the profane authors brought him not one crumb of the bread from heaven; in the rites of the Church there was not one drop of the water of life to quench his thirst. Lefevre scarcely dared tell him the little truth that he was leaning upon ; for he was not quite sure of it himself, and no lame man likes to give away his staff. The student went, restless and wretched, to several doctors of the age; but they only sent him away more wretched than before. He told them that he wanted to be a real Christian, and they gave him Aristotle as a guide! He read books, bowed to images, adored relics, invoked the saints, kept the fasts and festivals, carried his reverence for Mary to a superstitious extreme, and yet all proved worse than in vain. It was sending him to the brambles, under a delusion that from them he would gather grapes.

In his severe mental sufferings he learned one piece of good news. It was, that the ' holy father, the Pope,' was willing to allow the Old and New Testaments to be called the Holy Bible. Thanks to his holiness for this concession! If he had gone further and said, with one of the English martyrs, 'No writings are holy but the Bible,' it would have settled an important question in the anxious minds of hundreds, who, like young Farel, knew not which to believe—Christ or the Pope. That question was, Which shall we follow: the word of God, or the word of the Church? Farel thought that since the Pope acknowledged the great good book to be the Holy Bible, he might read it for himself. Surely the Pope and the apostles must agree in their teachings! But as he read the sacred page, he was amazed at seeing how they disagreed, and how different everything in Romanism was from the pure Christianity of the New Testament. Where was the mass taught in the Bible? Where prayer to the saints? Where the adoration of relics? Where the worship of the Virgin Mary? Where confession to priests? Where the paying of money for a pardon? Where purgatory? Where salvation by an endless round of mere works? Certainly not in the Bible. It taught repentance instead of penances; faith in the Crucified, rather than the adoration of the cross; prayer to Jesus, and not to the saints; and love to God, rather than the fear of the Pope. In its light he could

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