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The spirit of Calvin prevailed at last, and the Church of Geneva was permitted to guide her own affairs. And when the system of church government, introduced there by Farel and perfected by Calvin, was put into fair operation, its excellency was proved beyond any doubt. John Knox was so charmed with it that he wrote to his friend, John Locke : 'I always wished in my heart, nor could I ever cease to wish, that it might please God to bring me to this place, where I can say, without fear or shame, the best Christian school exists since the time of the apostles. I allow that Christ is truly preached in other places also; but in no other have I seen the Reformation so well wrought out, both morally and religiously, as in Geneva.' Let Farel, “to whom our people owe everything,' as Calvin declared, have the honour due to him, while unto God be all the glory.

Nor were the Genevese forgetful of his labours, sufferings, and love for them. When, as an aged father, he visited them, they strove together for the favour of showing him hospitality, and the senate proposed that a special sum be given him in order to detain him in their city, so that it might never be said that Geneva had treated him with ingratitude. But he was not willing to retire upon such honours and such generosity.

Amid these stirring events Farel had an unexpected call from that very France out of which he had been barred in his younger days. Even Paris was now open to him. A reformed church had grown up in that city, where the voices of Lefevre and Farel had once been heard and hushed. A child had something to do with its organization. When the disciples were few, they met in the house of the Seigneur de la Ferrière, 'to offer their prayers in common and read the Holy Scriptures.' This gentleman had a son that he wished to have baptized by a reformed minister. He made the proposal to the church in his house, and begged them to choose a minister. They chose John de Launay, who organized the church in Paris, destined to be renowned for the number of its devoted pastors and its triumphant martyrs.

In 1557 this church asked for a new minister. Farel must have felt it hard to refuse the call. The perils of the capital were inviting him. But Switzerland could not spare him. Nor could Fabri leave Neufchatel. Gasper Carmel obtained the dangerous honour, and he went to the city where his uncle (by marriage) had first found that light which had been borne by him into Switzerland, and was now to be carried back by his relative, whom he regarded as his own son in the faith. Thus Farel was at last represented in the heart of France ; an instance of the power of a delayed but yet widely extended personal influence. The great stream had run eastward and flooded the Swiss valleys with truth; but the clouds rising from those valleys were carried back westward, to drop refreshing rain upon the spiritual desert that Farel had once been obliged to leave.

The church and the school of theology at Lausanne preferred the doctrines and government of Geneva to all those of Berne. This greatly offended the Bernese senate. The strife waxed warm, until, finally, Viret and the professors left the city ; more than a thousand people went with them to Geneva, where they were most kindly received. Viret became one of the pastors there for two years, when he was called into France. Beza became the colleague of Calvin, and the rector of the new academy. Thus the losses of Lausanne were the gain of Geneva.

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CHAPTER XXI.
OLD LIFE WITH NEW LOVE

(1558-1564.) AFHE Waldenses in the holy valley,' where ngay

Farel had once been so happily entertained,

were threatened with utter extermination. * They sought aid from their true and tried friends in Geneva and Neufchatel. Farel and Beza set out upon a visit in their behalf. The journey would give them an opportunity to plead the cause of the churches in which the French language was used, for they were not fully recognised by the German churches. They afterwards were called by the term, The Reformed Church. John Budous, son of William Budæus, whom we saw at Paris reviving the ancient learning, also travelled on this latter mission on a later day.

The assistance rendered to the Waldenses by the churches from Berne to Basle, was greater than Farel expected. The cantons united in sending an embassy to the court of France, in order to stay the persecution. gentleman had a son that he wished to have baptized by a reformed minister. He made the proposal to the church in his house, and begged them to choose a minister. They chose John de Launay, who organized the church in Paris, destined to be renowned for the number of its devoted pastors and its triumphant martyrs.

1 As William Budæus [Bude] ordered in his will that his body should be buried without ceremony, some have inferred that he died in the Reformed faith. In 1549 his widow and children went to Geneva, where his descendants are still found.

In 1557 this church asked for a new minister. Farel must have felt it hard to refuse the call. The perils of the capital were inviting him. But Switzerland could not spare him. Nor could Fabri leave Neufchatel. Gasper Carmel obtained the dangerous honour, and he went to the city where his uncle (by marriage) had first found that light which had been borne by him into Switzerland, and was now to be carried back by his relative, whom he regarded as his own son in the faith. Thus Farel was at last represented in the heart of France; an instance of the power of a delayed but yet widely extended personal influence. The great stream had run eastward and flooded the Swiss valleys with truth; but the clouds rising from those valleys were carried back westward, to drop refreshing rain upon the spiritual desert that Farel had once been obliged to leave.

The church and the school of theology at Lausanne preferred the doctrines and government of Geneva to all those of Berne. This greatly offended the Bernese senate. The strife waxed warm, until, finally, Viret and the professors left the city ; more than a thousand people went with them to Geneva, where they were most kindly received. Viret became one of the pastors there for two years, when he was called into France. Beza became the colleague of Calvin, and the rector of the new academy. Thus the losses of Lausanne were the gain c Geneva.

to wait a little for a more convenient season. Meanwhile the new bishop had a word to say, and sent for certain of the council. He inquired and learned the object of this visit, and summoned Farel and Beynon before him. The bishop set forth a councillor, named Wandelin, to express his sentiments.

"Farel, you came here formerly to sow your tares,' said the bishop's mouthpiece, “and having been sent away by the late bishop, have refrained hitherto from repeating the attempt. We may reasonably be astonished at your daring to appear here again ; but you are now advised, in a friendly way, to retire before any mischief befall you.'

'I am here, by the authority of my Lord, to preach Christ and Him crucified,' Farel replied ; and to call this sowing tares is a grievous sin against the Saviour, and contrary to the Holy Scriptures. Besides, I have preached freely at places in this diocese, without ever being sent away, and I have taught doctrines which are the surest means of uniting people and princes, flocks and pastors, namely, obedience to Christ and to His word. If my doctrines can be proved to be false, I am ready to submit to any punishment.'

'I approve of your principles,' said Wandelin, perhaps speaking for himself rather than the bishop; but I must be excused from putting them in practice. Wherever you have preached you have abolished the mass, and Berne has not allowed it to be restored. It will be so here if you gain a foothold, which we will do our best to prevent.'

Farel bade the council a respectful farewell, and, entering the streets, he saw multitudes whom the news of his arrival had brought from all quarters to hear him. But

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