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be said of each of them, as of a celebrated crusader, ' He was a lamb in his own affairs, but a lion in the cause of God.'

Calvin dedicated his Commentary on the Epistle to Titus to Farel and Viret, in these touching words : 'As the condition of my charge resembles that which St. Paul committed to Titus, it seemed to me that it was you, above all others, to whom I ought to dedicate this my labour. It will, at least, afford those of our own times, and, perhaps, even those who come after us, some indication of our friendship and holy communion. There never have been, I think, two friends who lived together in such friendship, in the common intercourse of the world, as we have in our ministry. I have exercised the office of a pastor here with you two, and with such entire freedom from any appearance of envy that you and I appeared but as one.'

The subject is worthy of D'Aubign^'s enthusiasm; and when writing of the different work of the scholar and of the missionary, he says, 'Calvin was the great doctor of the sixteenth century, and Farel the great evangelist; the latter is one of the most remarkable figures in the Reformation. . . . Farel had the riches of nature, of art, and of grace. His life was a series of battles and victories. Every time he went forth, it was conquering and to conquer.'

The scholar of the Swiss reform is now dead; the missionary must gird himself, old as he is, for another march and another triumph. His burning zeal must have vent, and he cannot rest at home. If he cannot go into the heart of that France whose invitation just missed him, when he first entered among the Alps, he will cross the border and try to see the glorious gospel established in

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Metz before he dies. This city has given him the good Chevalier Esch, and Toussaint, who has reaped what he had sown at Montbeliard, besides giving him many honourable scars to signalize his courage, and touch the hearts of those among whom he has sought aid for its suffering Protestants.

The ministers consented to his plan, and the Senate of Neufchatel commissioned one of their number to attend him, lest their very aged father should fall into danger. There was extraordinary joy on his arrival in the city. On that very day he preached with such energy and power that the Church took fresh courage. But it was too much for him; the light was cast at the expense of the lamp. He sank down upon his couch after his return from the pulpit, and with difficulty was carried back to Neufchatel. His room became his church, and he was visited by people of all ranks. He exhorted them to obey the laws of the state and of the Church, and to hold fast their profession of faith. Like an apostle, he counselled them; like a brother, he shared in their sympathies; and like a father, he comforted them. All were astonished at his love and zeal in coming to them when so feeble, and at his patience and resignation. 'See,' said they to one another,' this man is the very same that he has always been! We never knew him depressed, even when our hearts were failing us for fear. When we were ready to give up everything in despair, he was full of hope, and he cheered us by his Christian heroism!'

He lingered a few weeks, proved to all who came in tears to his bedside the power of the Lord to give life to the dying, and gently fell asleep in Christ. He died, September 13th, 1565, in the seventy-sixth year of his age, about fifteen months after Calvin's departure. He was buned in a churchyard of Neufchatel, where he had seen most marvellous changes since the day that he had boldly preached in the * streets. The churches of the whole canton lamented his death. The ministers felt that his merits should be known to posterity, and at once proposed to collect materials for his biography.

Who should be his successor at Neufchatel? Viret was chosen; but he declined, for he was engaged in France, probably then at Lyons. A school of theology was rising in Navarre, where the influence of Margaret, the queen, had so favoured Protestantism that it had been a refuge and a stronghold. Viret was called thither, and died two years before the massacre of St. Bartholomew's day crushed the glorious Church in France, and filled all Christendom with horror.

The next choice fell upon Christopher Fabri, long before sent into the field by Farel from his couch at Morat. Farel had been so earnest for labourers in the great harvest, that he had sometimes put forward young and untried men, who proved unworthy of the trust; but in this brother he was not disappointed. He testified that, during the thirty-one years Fabri had assisted him at Morat, Orbe, Grandson, Thun, and Geneva, and during the three different periods in which they were colleagues at Neufchatel, no grievous misunderstanding had ever arisen between them.

He also was loved by Calvin, who had first heard of him in a strange way. When Calvin was at Basle, before he dreamed of ever living in Geneva, a total stranger one day called. He came to deliver a message from a medical student of Montpelier, who had lately entered the ministry, and had been reading a new book of Calvin's, that was having a wide popularity. 'Fabri has Metz before he dies. This city has given him the good Chevalier Esch, and Toussaint, who has reaped what he had sown at Montbeliard, besides giving him man}' honourable scars to signalize his courage, and touch the hearts of those among whom he has sought aid for its suffering Protestants.

The ministers consented to his plan, and the Senate of Neufchatel commissioned one of their number to attend him, lest their very aged father should fall into danger. There was extraordinary joy on his arrival in the city. On that very day he preached with such energy and power that the Church took fresh courage. But it was too much for him; the light was cast at the expense oi the lamp. He sank down upon his couch after his retu... from the pulpit, and with difficulty was carried back Neufchatel. His room became his church, and lie . visited by people of all ranks. He exhorted the. obey the laws of the state and of the Church, a hold fast their profession of faith. Like an apo-'' counselled them; like a brother, he shared i sympathies; and like a father, he comforted ther were astonished at his love and zeal in coming' when so feeble, and at his patience and re?' 'See,' said they to one another,' this man is the' that he has always been! We never knew him ■' even when our hearts were failing us for fear. were ready to give up everything in despair, of hope, and he cheered us by his Christian

He lingered a few weeks, proved to all tears to his bedside the power of the L01V, the dying, and gently fell asleep in Ch September 13th, 1565, in the seventy-^ age, about fifteen months after Calvin's

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