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Cutter's crew.-Aye! aye! Sir!

Potpan.-Oh Lord ! Sir! Don't press me! I shall be of no manner of use to you. Mr. Llewellyn will tell you how I got into the henсоор when

you

fired the cannon. Mr. Llewellyn.— I saw the steward put his head into a hencoop. He shivered and shook like a lady's lap-dog.

Officer.-No matter. He will make a laquais for the starboard-wing birth. He will do to lock up the young hyson, break the treble-refined sugar, rub down the mahogany side-board, and beat the dust out of the Turkey carpet.-Bear a hand there with Peter Potpan's hammock.

Mr. Llewellyn.I reckon, Sir, he will give you but a flemish account of your tea and sugar.

He has no economy.

Mr. Adams.-And he eats like a shark.

Officer.—No matter. We will feed him with bullock's liver and saw-dust.

Potpan.--Oh! Lord! Sir! I am of a good family.

Officer.-I am glad to hear it Peter Potpan. If you do not disgrace your armorial bearings, I will marry you, when our ship gets to Portsmouth, to Lady Amelia Night-work's maid. The girl is of a good family too. She is descended from Eve. And a midshipman's boy, and a lady's maid, will make a charming couple.

Mr. Llewellyn.-Marry him to the gunner's daughter, Sir.

Officer:-No, I am in earnest. Lady Amelia lives at the midshipman's fresh-beef house; at the brass-knocker under the battery. She wants her maid spliced. And spliced Peter Potpan shall be to Betty Blowhard.

Coxswain of the boat.--(Hal in hand) Peter Pospan is in the boat, Sir.

Officer. And his sack of war?
Coxswain.-Yes, Sir, hammock and chest both.

Officer.-Very well. Sheer the boat to. I am coming myself.

The boat now shoved off, doubly valuable from the acquisition of Peter Potpan ;-and, taking a man of war's sweep, she got alongside of the frigate.

Mr. Llewellyn.We have lost a prime hand, Sir.

Capiain.— Yes, a smart rope-yarn. I shall have to make a signal of distress.

Mr. Adams.-Did the steward take his boots with him.

Mr. Llewellyn.Yes, both of them. Both the larboard and starboard ones.

Little Boy.-Oh! crimini ! They have taken away the steward ! Who will empty the buckets now ? Mr. Adams what must I do?

Mr. Adams.—Why take a reef in your guts.

Mr. Llewellyn.You must leave off casting up your accounts, my son,

Little Boy.-But I can't help being sick, Mr. Llewellyn.

Mr. Llewellyn.—Then you must puke in your hand, and heave it overboard. But don't dirty the cabin !

Captain. Fill the maintop-sail. Come aft to the main-brace.

Sailors.-(Pulling) Hoa hoa yo ho! Where's the steward hoa yoa hoa ! Drag hearty hoa! yo hoa ! Call the steward hoa yo hoa !

Captain.—There! you are well with the mainyard ! Belay!

We had scarcely made sail, when the frigate putting her helm up, ran right under our stern, and the Captain of her again hailed us with his speaking trumpet.

American ahoy!"--"Ho:loa!"..“Whymy petty “ officer has taken a fellow out of your ship, that

I would not swab my deck with. A dirty blood “ of a b-h, he will give my ship's company the

yellow fever. Get a rope ready for the boat. “ I will send the vagabond on board of you

again.”

The man of war's cutter again came alongside of us; and Peter Potpan was restored to his former dignity.

“ I am glad,” cried Peter Potpân, “I am got " back to the Olive. I had not been five minutes “ on board the frigate, before one of the mid

shipmen began to hide me. But I still kept

saying, I was a Kentucky man, and my story só imposed upon the Captain.”

Both ships now made sail. The frigate hauled

up to the westward, and the Olive jogged on her old course, and at her usual

pace. We had parted company with the frigate only a few days, when the cry of Neptune ! Neptune ! resounded from every part of the ship, and, on looking forward I, to my utter astonishment, beheld the venerable Monarch of the waves ascend the bows with his trident in his hand.* Iran towards the forecastle to receive him, and give my hand to his wife Amphitrite, together with her attendant goddesses, who were climbing up the cutwater in succession.

Neptune recognized me in a moment. In fact the motive that incited him to come on board, was to impart something to me in private. We were old acquaintance. I had been introduced to him on the Line in my very early youth, and caroused with him in the cabins of a dozen or more ships.

Having retired to a convenient part of the deck, the god of the sea thus addressed me.

It has not escaped my notice that certain persons living on the island whose ships main“ tain a supreme ascendancy in my dominions, “ have, in certain books of extensive circulation, “ drawn such monsters as a ship never saw, and “presumptuously called them sailors. Certain “ authors by profession, named Cumberland and

Pratt, have atrociously offended in this par66 ticular. Godwin, with more judgment, has

* It is in this manner a Sailor comes first on board ship;'always at the bows, never through the cabin-windows,

confined himself in his last work to the telling “ of lies through four volumes, and Saint Leon is “ not once to be found in my dominions. But

Holcroft has incurred my wrath. While Holcroft continues to dress his characters invariably " in leather-breeches and boots, and does not “ invade my sea-weed, it is for the woollen“ draper and shoe-maker to call him to an ac“count; but when he makes his personages to

swear more than a swab-ringer, or a boatswain's yeoman, he robs my sailors of their oaths.

“ To caution these men against a repetition of “ their crimes, is my motive of visiting your ship “ in this unusual latitude. My sprite Ariel in“ formed me you were again on the ocean, and I “ have come since last night from the Tropic, with

my wife and her nymphs, to put into your “ hands a proclamation, which, as you value fair “ winds, clear skies, and smooth water, I enjoin you to publish. And I impose that

you

make “ it first known in a certain city of your island,

where, in one of the principal streets, the inha“ bitants have erected a statue to me, which, in “ majesty of countenance, dignity of mien, and

symmetry of limb, is not to be exceeded by the « Belvidere Apollo."

Having concluded his speech, Neptune again stalked forward to the bows of the ship, followed by his goddess and her attendant nymphs. He ordered his car to be brought under the bows. But in passing the foremast, it ought not to escape

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