Manuals of the science and art of teaching. Advanced ser

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1880
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Página 48 - Most potent, grave, and reverend signiors, My very noble and approv'd good masters,— That I have ta'en away this old man's daughter, It is most true; true, I have married her; The very head and front of my offending Hath this extent, no more. Rude am I in my speech, And little bless'd with the set phrase of peace; For since these arms of mine had seven years...
Página 40 - As ships becalmed at eve, that lay With canvas drooping, side by side, Two towers of sail, at dawn of day Are scarce long leagues apart descried...
Página 52 - Oft did the harvest to their sickle yield, Their furrow oft the stubborn glebe has broke ; How jocund did they drive their team afield ! How bowed the woods beneath their sturdy stroke ! Let not Ambition mock their useful toil, Their homely joys and destiny obscure.
Página 58 - The [*418] royal navy of England hath ever been its greatest defence and ornament ; it is its ancient and natural strength ; the floating bulwark of the island...
Página 34 - The latent tracts, the giddy heights explore Of all who blindly creep, or sightless soar; Eye Nature's walks, shoot folly as it flies, And catch the manners living as they rise : Laugh where we must, be candid where we can; 15 But vindicate the ways of God to man.
Página 40 - But O blithe breeze ; and O great seas, Though ne'er, that earliest parting past, On your wide plain they join again, Together lead them home at last. One port, methought, alike they sought, One purpose hold where'er they fare,— 0 bounding breeze, O rushing seas ! At last, at last, unite them there!
Página 40 - E'en so — but why the tale reveal Of those, whom year by year unchanged, Brief absence joined anew to feel, Astounded, soul from soul estranged ? At dead of night their sails were filled, And onward each rejoicing steered — Ah, neither blame, for neither willed, Or wist, what first with dawn appeared!
Página 38 - Elizabethan writers : — that, lastly, to what was thus inherited they added a richness in language and a variety in metre, a force and fire in narrative, a tenderness and bloom in feeling, an insight into the finer passages of the Soul and the inner meanings of the landscape, a larger and wiser Humanity,— hitherto scarcely attained, and perhaps unattainable even by predecessors of not inferior individual genius.
Página 34 - AWAKE, my St John ! leave all meaner things To low ambition, and the pride of kings. Let us (since life can little more supply Than just to look about us and to die) Expatiate free o'er all this scene of Man ; A mighty maze ! but not without a plan ; A wild, where weeds and flowers promiscuous shoot ; Or garden, tempting with forbidden fruit.
Página 31 - ... with their resemblances, and brought by having them often iterated into a love of the things themselves. For which cause there is nothing more contagious and pestilent than some kinds of harmony ; than some, nothing more strong and potent unto good. And that there is such a difference of one kind from another we need no proof but our own experience...

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