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Which never, I fear, will be melted,

And when I'm alone, sir,

I grunt and I groan, sir,
By the storm of her cruelty pelted.

But she, cruel fair,

Says she should not care, If I were as dead as a herring,

With a heart like a feather,

She'd go any weather, And dance all the way to my burying!

Well, since I can't please her,

I'll no longer tease her, But seek me out some other pretty one,

Who if not quite so killing,

Is a little more willing,
To condescend kindly to pity one.

SONG

WRITTEN FOR THE NEW ENGLAND SOCIETY OF THE

STATE OF NEW YORK, AND SUNG THE TWENTY FIRST DECEMBER, 1805, AT THE CELEBRATION OF THE ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY FIFTH ANNIVER

SARY OF THE FIRST LANDING OF THE COLONISTS

AT PLYMOUTH.

Tune Anacreon in Heaven.

WHILE round the full board, in festivity's glee

The sons of New England all joyous assemble, Let us swear to live ever united and free,

That our friends may rejoice, and our enemies : tremble ;

For friendship carest

In each patriot breast, Shall sweeten enjoyment, give pleasure its zest, And the virtues approving shall sanction the plan, Which strengthens their empire and dignifies man. This day did our fathers, on Plymouth's bleak coast, The corner stone place of an empire's foundation, The mansion of freedom-of patriots the boast, The nursery of heroes—the worlds admiration.

From them while we trace

Our illustrious race, Their merits from mem’ry may time ne'er ef

face, While the virtues approving shall sanction the plan, Which strengthens their empire and dignifies man.

Ye sages and patriots, whom liberty fired,

The great architects of American glory,
Whose names and achievements for ages admir’d,
Shall be burnish'd by bards and be blazon'd in

story.
To us, sainted sires,

Impart your own fires,
When freedom commands and when glory in-

spires, While seraphs, approving, new triumphs shall plan, And New England heroes lead victory's van.

FINIS:

EXTRACTS

FROM ENGLISH REVIEWS

OF

ORIGINAL POEMS.

“A VEIN of pleasantry and sportive humour is mani. fested by this American writer, which cannot fail to amuse and conciliate the reader, when he is disposed to quit his serious studies and welcome a playful guest.” “Whenever an opportunity occurs, the author takes care to inculcate in the minds of his countrymen a spirit of manly indepena.. dence, and a rational love of liberty.” The reviewers then make a quotation from the work, and conclude as follows:

“ We recommend these patriotick lines to the attention, of our own countrymen, as worthy of a great and independent nation. In the mean time, we are happy to observe that this author expresses his wishes to preserve and perpetuate harmony between his country and England. We trust and hope that such a disposition is cordially cherished by the freeborn inhabitants of both states."

Monthly Review.

“ We were amused with the burlesque poem called Terrible Tractoration. That Mr. F. possesses a sina

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