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generally, would give an incalculable impulse to the School of exertion and diligence.

Your Committee have to notice, with much gratitude, the cordial manner in which the Lord Bishop of the Diocese expressed his approbation of the principles of this Institution, and permitted them to record his name among the Vice-presidents, and most liberal Annual Subscribers.

Your Committee have recejved a very flattering instance of the estimation in which the School is held, by a handsome donation of nine pounds, to be expended in Bibles, from the funds of a late voluntary association for the distribution of the Holy Scriptures.

They consider the tbanks of the Subscribers to be due to the Committee of that Society generally, but especially to Mr. E. Bird, whose good will procured so large a portion of these funds for your benefit.

But your Committee have been above measure gratified by an unexpected testimony of the worth of their undertaking, in a present of a printed model of an Astar Screen, neatly framed, sent by Mr. Daniel Mathias, one of the late pupils of the School, accompanied by a most affectionate “ acknowledgment of the manifold benefits he experienced through the instrumentality of this Institution, and a desire to throw in his mite, and to tender this his frail offering in testimony of the great value in which he holds the School.” Your Committee also invite the attention of the Subscribers to the pleasing fact, that if they add the date of the Institution to the usual age of the children, they will find, that they are receiving in this present token, only the first fruits of that gratitude which the age of experience will teach many more to feel and to publish.

Your Committee state with gratitude to the subscribers that the Funds of the School are very fairly kept up, and adequate to the common items of expenditure ; but they regret that much remains to be done, to insure the full benefit of the spirited arrangements for the comforts of the master and children, and for the carrying on of the different works of industry

VOL. XI. NO, XII.

attached to the Girls' School. When the public is fully sensible of the benefit to be derived, a strenuous and complete effort must be made to extricate the School-house from its present incumbrances.

Your Committee are very sensible of the obligations they are under for the visits paid by several friends to the Schools, and most particularly by ladies, of whose constant but unpretending watchfulness over the best interests of the girls, they cannot trust themselves to express all their feelings, lest they should offend retiring delicacy. In the Boys' School the master has had frequent cause of lamenting that discipline has been at a very low ebb, for want of a superior tribunal, which should have authority and be binding on the children's minds. A constant succession of visitors is the only thing wanting to double the effect of this system of teaching, for the master and teachers are parts of the machinery only; the subscribers themselves are the prime movers of the operation.

Your Committee entreat you to take up, as a privilege, your responsibility in regard to the objects of your recommendation. They would entreat their friends to consider themselves as fathers and mothers in God, and the common faith, to those whom they place here, and not lose sight of them and their conduct, till they have taken upon themselves the management of their actions. The number of children remains the same as at the last meeting. There are at present 105 boys and sixty-three girls. There have been many changes among the boys. Many teachers have left the School, whose places are supplied by boys of considerable promise; some have left under circumstances not very favourable to their credit, but your Committee are pleased with reporting that they have taken cheerfully to hard and laborious callings, and that even those boys, who were irregular in conforming to the strict order of the School, prove themselves still very much more tractable than the other unfortunates, whose friends have not availed themselves of this opportunity of training them. This circumstance appears to them to show, that when once chil

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MONTHLY REGISTER.

SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE. The Parent Society has lately issued from these documents, that at the its Annual Report, preceded by the first of these dates, namely, the Audit Bishop of Llandaft's excellent sermon for 1809, the annual expenditure of the at the Anniversary Meeting of the Society amounted to 17,9101. 198. 5d.; Charity Schools, at St. Paul's, and re- the number of Bibles distributed in the plete with the most interesting in- year to 8,881, the number of Testaformation respecting the proceedings ments to 13,730, the number of Books of the Society. Most of our readers of Common Prayer to 20,876, the have, before this time, received the number of religious books to 20,867, copy to which they are entitled as sub- and the number of tracts to 127,193. scribing members. We recommend “In 1819 the expenditure amounted them to lose no time in making them to 52,6841. 8s. 8d. ; the number of selves acquainted with its contents : Bibles distributed to 31,756, the numwhile, for the benefit of those who are ber of Testaments to 53,635, the not subscribers, we subjoin the follow- number of Books of Common Prayer ing extract, which cannot fail, we to 87,885, the number of religious think, of eliciting an increase of con- books to 76,203, and the number of tributions to the furtherance of its tracts to 940,014. laudable designs:

“In the year that has just closed, “ The Society has again to perform the expenditure has amounted to the grateful task of announcing an 72,2121. 48. 9d.; the number of Bibles augmentation in its annual receipts distributed to 60,668, the number of and expenditure, and a proportionate Testaments and Psalters to 79,164, increase in its distribution of books. the number of Books of Common But the degree in which the Institu Prayer to 151,702, the number of retion has accomplished the great work ligious books to 115,927, and the numfor which it was formed, and the rate ber of tracts to 1,197,443. at which it is advancing towards the There can be no difference of opicompletion of its task, will be most nion respecting the inference to be distinctly shown by comparing the drawn from these facts. They prove operations of the past year with those that there is an effective demand for not merely of the year immediately the services of the Institution, and a preceding it, but of others removed general disposition to support it. And from it by a considerable interval. the Society must naturally be stimuUpon a comparison of the Audit Pa lated by these circumstances to adopt per for the year 1829 with similar every measure by which it may merit documents for the years 1809 and a continuance of the patronage which 1819, a fair estimate may be formed it now enjoys, and may be enabled to of the progress of the Society during perform the great work in which it the last twenty years. It appears has embarked.”

CARDIFF SCHOOL FOR PROMOTING THE EDUCATION OF

THE POOR.

Fourteenth Annual Report. It gives the Committee unmixed Bute) and his family, who not only pleasure to report, that the School still contribute munificently to its funds, enjoys the privilege of the noble and using every opportunity of showing distinguished patronage which has al- their bounty, but their President, in his ready advanced it to its present high own person, condescends to take a repute and usefulness. They cannot part in the labour of superintendance withhold their sense of obligation to with an alacrity and heartiness, which, the Noble President (the Marquess of if communicated to the Subscribers

dreams; but knowing that heavy national guilt has been incurred, we cannot do other than expect heavy national chastisement; and appear ances certainly warrant the supposition that Ireland, the tranquillization of which was made an excuse for open disobedience to the revealed will of God, may become, in his hands, the means of teaching the country that it would have been better to have adhered tenaciously to his commands, and abstained from the slightest union with idolaters. The disruption between the Protestants and Papists has been widened instead of diminished: in our day, as in St. Paul's, the question may be asked, “What fellowship hath light with darkness?"

FRANCE.-A slight change is about to take place in the French Cabinet. M. de la Bourdonnaye, a person who, from his ultra-royalism, is extremely obnoxious to the party opposed to Government, and who, from his general warmth of language and manner, as well as from the extravagant projects he is continually suggesting, was not very useful to his own, will retire. He was very averse to the appointment of Prince Polignac to the Presidency of the Council, and insisted that either himself or the Prince must give up office. Such being the case, and it being impossible to form a Cabinet on M. de la Bourdonnaye's principles, added to the conviction that it would be worse than useless if formed, the decision was easily taken. It does not appear that his resignation will be followed by any others, though it has been rumoured that M. Mangin, Chief of the Police, and General de Bourmont, the Minister of War, a very clever, but an unpopular man, will not remain long after him. These resignations will tend to strengthen the ministry; for even the virulence of faction has not ventured to asperse the honour or abilities of Prince Polignac; and should he be joined by colleagues less decidedly pledged to extravagant principles, he will probably be able to command the Chambers; a circumstance obviously impossible while M. de la Bourdonnaye continues a member of the Cabinet. These changes are unimportant to Great Britain, ex

cept in one respect; the party of which Prince Polignac is the leader, is pledged to preserve the peace of Europe, and to cultivate in every honourable manner a good understanding between the two countries; in any other manner Britons will not require it. The liberals who were in office before them were eager for war, and decidedly hostile in spirit to England; and as war would be equally impolitic in either nation, it is, therefore, for their mutual interest that ministers, who will sedulously endeavour to preserve peace, should have power in France."

Russia and Turkey.--The negotiations continue between the governments of these countries; but, of course, every question that arises is settled as the Emperor Nicholas desires. The Sultan is endeavouring to raise the first instalment, in which, from the exhausted state, not merely of his treasury, but also of his whole dominions, he experiences serious difficulties, and will probably be obliged to have recourse to a foreign loan. He has recovered in a great measure from the dejection into which he was thrown by his unexpected reverses, and has resumed the training of his troops, reviewing them almost daily, as he still perseveres in his resolution to place his military force on an imposing footing; and his subjects positively affirm, that, with his great energy and remarkable genius for finding resources, he will soon emerge from his present disagreeable situation, and again place his empire in a respectable rank. But it is now too late ; the internal weakness of the Turkish empire has been too fully developed for it ever to resume that place among the European states, which it has hitherto occupied. The want of fidelity exhibited by the Pachas, in their slowness or refusal to attend the summons of their master, is a sufficient proof that, at home, his authority is little regarded, and his displeasure little dreaded, which could not be the case if his officers considered he had power to enforce his commands; and a government that cannot make itself obeyed and respected at home, must never hope to have weight with foreign powers; whilst the loss of the principalities ceded to Russia, for the

me void ; but it shall accomplish that which I please, and it shall prosper in the thing whereto I sent it."*

Receipts ......£192 6 4

dren are trained in this system, al-
though they may resist for a time,
and even break loose, the mark of
reduction to civilized habits will never
be entirely defaced. Your Committee
conclude, with reminding you of that
scriptural pledge of the final good
result of your charitable endeavours:-
“ So shall my word be that goeth out
of my mouth, it shall not return unto

Disbursements ... 137 7 104

By Balance ... 54 18 57

£192 6 4

NATIONAL SOCIETY. Meeting on the 4th of November, Leignhead, Devon ; Tenby, Pem1829, at St. Martin's Vestry-room. broke; Ticehurst, Sussex; and WalSchools received into Union, at Ban- ton-on-the-Hill, Surrey. sted, Surrey ; E. Bridgford, Notts ; GRANTS—Hampreston, 501.; DroitBrockenhurst, Hants; Chingford, Es- wich, 100l. ; Stoke-in-Leignhead, 402.; sex; Church Kirk, Lancashire ; Droit- Bewdley, 707 ; Gloucester, 501.; Pemwich, Worcestershire; Elton, Hants; broke, 201.; Merton, 201.; StanningHampreston, Dorset ; Kilmington, So- ton, 501. ; Church Kirk, 701.; Ticemerset; Merton, Oxon ; Kilburn, hurst, 751. ; Salford, 75l.; Kilburn, Middlesex; N. Lydbury, Salop; New- 201. ; G. Budworth, Cheshire, 301.; ton, Lancashire; St. Peter's, Oxford; Bury, Lancashire, 1001. ; Shepton Pattingham, Worcestershire ; Pem Mallet, Somerset, 20%. ; Haslingfield, bury, Kent; Salford, Lancashire; Cambridgeshire, 201.; and St. George's Stannington, Yorkshire ; Stoke-in- Leicester, 1001.

POLITICAL RETROSPECT.

Domestic.—The trial before a Special Commission at Cork, for the conspiracy at Doneraile to murder three private gentlemen, has ended in a manner not very favourable to the future tranquillity of Ireland. Of the four persons arraigned, one was acquitted without much discussion, and the remaining three have been respited, in consequence of one juror persisting in a verdict of acquittal against the judgment of his eleven brethren. The alleged ground of his refusal to coincide with them, was the self-acknowledged bad character of the principal witnesses for the crown, who, being themselves accessories and approvers of the conspiracy, are, of course, deeply implicated in the crime.

Another topic of agitation has been started in the sister kingdom. The popish faction, finding themselves successful in their former undertakings,

no matter how audacious they might be, now claim the independence of Ireland, and are preparing a new association to promote that object; nor can their claims excite astonishment, since, when was ambition satisfied by obtaining its aim ? another object never fails to arise, apparently more desirable. The priests and agitators of Ireland, having overthrown the Constitution of the empire with so much ease, that they are themselves surprised at what they have done, may readily believe that they shall with equal ease take a portion of it from its intimidated rulers. Those who are observers of the ways of Providence must often have noticed that, from the very advantages expected to arise from sin, and which have tempted the commission of it, He has, by a retributive justice, caused the punishment to arise. We do not indulge in prophetic

dreams; but knowing that heavy national guilt has been incurred, we cannot do other than expect heavy national chastisement; and appearances certainly warrant the supposition that Ireland, the tranquillization of which was made an excuse for open disobedience to the revealed will of God, may become, in his hands, the means of teaching the country that it would have been better to have adhered tenaciously to his commands, and abstained from the slightest union with idolaters. The disruption between the Protestants and Papists has been widened instead of diminished: in our day, as in St. Paul's, the question may be asked, “What fellowship hath light with darkness?" · FRANCE.--A slight change is about to take place in the French Cabinet. M. de la Bourdonnaye, a person who, from his ultra-royalism, is extremely obnoxious to the party opposed to Government, and who, from his general warmth of language and manner, as well as from the extravagant projects he is continually suggesting, was not very useful to his own, will retire. He was very averse to the appointment of Prince Polignac to the Presidency of the Council, and insisted that either himself or the Prince must give up office. Such being the case, and it being impossible to form a Cabinet on M. de la Bourdonnaye's principles, added to the conviction that it would be worse than useless if formed, the decision was easily taken. It does not appear that his resignation will be followed by any others, though it has been rumoured that M. Mangin, Chief of the Police, and General de Bourmont, the Minister of War, a very clever, but an unpopular man, will not remain long after him. These resignations will tend to strengthen the ministry; for even the virulence of faction has not ventured to asperse the honour or abilities of Prince Polignac; and should he be joined by colleagues less decidedly pledged to extravagant principles, he will probably be able to command the Chambers; a circumstance obviously impossible while M. de la Bourdonnaye continues a member of the Cabinet. These changes are unimportant to Great Britain, ex

cept in one respect; the party of which Prince Polignac is the leader, is pledged to preserve the peace of Europe, and to cultivate in every honourable manner a good understanding between the two countries; in any other manner Britons will not require it. The liberals who were in office before them were eager for war, and decidedly hostile in spirit to England; and as war would be equally impolitic in either nation, it is, therefore, for their mutual interest that ministers, who will sedulously endeavour to preserve peace, should have power in France.

Russia and Turkey.--The negotiations continue between the governments of these countries; but, of course, every question that arises is settled as the Emperor Nicholas desires. The Sultan is endeavouring to raise the first instalment, in which, from the exhausted state, not merely of his treasury, but also of his whole dominions, he experiences serious difficulties, and will probably be obliged to have recourse to a foreign loan. He has recovered in a great measure from the dejection into which he was thrown by his unexpected reverses, and has resumed the training of his troops, reviewing them almost daily, as he still perseveres in his resolution to place his military force on an imposing footing; and his subjects positively affirm, that, with his great energy and remarkable genius for finding resources, he will soon emerge from his present disagreeable situation, and again place his empire in a respectable rank. But it is now too late; the internal weakness of the Turkish empire has been too fully developed for it ever to resume that place among the European states, which it has hitherto occupied. The want of fidelity exhibited by the Pachas, in their slowness or refusal to attend the summons of their master, is a sufficient proof that, at home, his authority is little regarded, and his displeasure little dreaded, which could not be the case if his officers considered he had power to enforce his commands; and a government that cannot make itself obeyed and respected at home, must never hope to have weight with foreign powers; whilst the loss of the principalities ceded to Russia, for the

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