Mirages of the Selfe: Patterns of Personhood in Ancient and Early Modern Europe

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Stanford University Press, 2003 - 608 páginas
Through extensive readings in philosophical, legal, medical, and imaginative writing, this book explores notions and experiences of being a person from European antiquity to Descartes. It offers quite new interpretations of what it was to be a person to experience who-ness in other times and places, involving new understandings of knowing, willing, and acting, as well as of political and material life, the play of public and private, passions and emotions.

The trajectory the author reveals reaches from the ancient sense of personhood as set in a totality of surroundings inseparable from the person, to an increasing sense of impermeability to the world, in which anger has replaced love in affirming a sense of self. The author develops his analysis through an impressive range of authors, languages, and texts: from Cicero, Seneca, and Galen; through Avicenna, Hildegard of Bingen, and Heloise and Abelard; to Petrarch, Montaigne, and Descartes.

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Contenido

Essences of Glass Histories of Humans
26
Plato the Hippocratics
67
Excursus on Will and Passibility
98
Ciceros Person Passible Minds and Real Worlds
120
Senecan Surroundings
139
How Were Slaves Persons?
162
How Was Personhood Gendered?
182
Galen
212
Sparsa anime fragmenta recolligam
331
Sixteenth
353
Loyola with
381
Collective Love Singular
404
Montaigne
440
Descartes Collective Tradition and Personal Agency
469
Selfehood Political Community and a Cartesian
488
Bibliography
529

Augustine
241
Measuring Tensions in the Medieval Microcosm
269
Multum a me ipso differre compulsus sum
303

Términos y frases comunes

Acerca del autor (2003)

Timothy J. Reiss is Professor of Comparative Literature at New York University. The most recent of his many books is Against Autonomy: Global Dialectics of Cultural Exchange (Stanford, 2002).

Información bibliográfica