Sonnets of this Century

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William Sharp
W. Scott, 1886 - 333 páginas

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Contenido

DOBELL SYDNEY lxiv The Army Surgeon
64
The Common Grave
65
In War Time
66
DOBSON AUSTIN lxvii Don Quixote
67
DOUBLEDAY THOMAS lxviii The Sea Cave
68
Angling
69
DOWDEN EDWARD lxx An Interior
70
Evening near the Sea
71
Awakening
72
Two Infinities
73
Brother Death
74
EARLE JOHN CHARLES lxxv Rest
75
ELLIOTT EBENEZER lxxvi Fountains Abbey
76
ELLIS JOSEPH lxxvii Silence
77
ELLISON HENRY lxxviii A Sunset Thought
78
London after Midnight
79
Sunset
80
FABER FREDERICK WILLIAM Ixxxi Socrates lxxxii On the Ramparts at Angoulême
82
FANE JULIAN lxxxiii Ad Matrem FREELAND WILLIAM lxxxiv In Prospect of Death The NewComers
83
GARNETT RICHARD lxxxv
85
Dante Garibaldis Retirement 85
86
GOSSE EDMUND W lxxxvii February in Rome lxxxviii On a Lute Found in a Scarcophagus
88
Ixxxix Alcyone xc The Tomb of Sophocles
90
GRAY DAVID xci The Thrushs Song
91
To a Friend
92
HALLAM ARTHUR HENRY xciii Written in Edinburgh
93
HAMILTON EUGENE LEE xciv SeaShell Murmurs xcv Judith xcvi Idle Charon xcvii Lethe xcviii Sunken Gold The Phantom Ship 93
94
HAMILTON SIR WILLIAM ROWAN xcix To Death
99
Spirit of Wisdom and of Love 99
100
cxiv On First Looking into Chapmans Homer
114
KEMBLE FRANCES ANNE
120
MARSTON WESTLAND cxxxiii Mine cxxxiv Immortality
134
MEREDITH GEORGE CXXXV Lucifer in Starlight Five Irregular Sonnets from Modern Love
135
MEYNELL ALICE cxxxvi Renouncement cxxxvii Without Him cxxxviii Spring among the Alban Hills A Day to Come MONKHOUSE COSMO cx...
136
MYERS FREDERICK W H cxliii Inimortality cxliv Would God it were Morning
144
High Tide at Midnight
145
NEWMAN JOHN HENRY CARDINAL cxlvi Substance and Shadow
146
London
148
Crowned
149
NOBLE J ASHCROFT cl A Characterand a Question
150
Only a Womans Hair
151

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Página lvi - Since there's no help. come let us kiss and part: Nay. I have done: you get no more of me. And I am glad. yea. glad with all my heart. That thus so cleanly I myself can free: Shake hands for ever. cancel all our vows. And when we meet at any time again. Be it not seen in either of our brows That we one jot of former love retain.
Página 114 - Homer ruled as his demesne : Yet did I never breathe its pure serene Till I heard Chapman speak out loud and bold: Then felt I like some watcher of the skies When a new planet swims into his ken ; Or like stout Cortez when with eagle eyes He...
Página 119 - Bright Star! would I were steadfast as thou art — Not in lone splendour hung aloft the night, And watching, with eternal lids apart, Like Nature's patient, sleepless Eremite, The moving waters at their priestlike task Of pure ablution round earth's human shores...
Página 202 - I MET a traveller from an antique land Who said : Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Stand in the desert. Near them, on the sand, Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown, And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command, Tell that its sculptor well those passions read Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things, The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed. And on the pedestal these words appear: " My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair !
Página 264 - IT is a beauteous evening, calm and free, The holy time is quiet as a nun Breathless with adoration ; the broad sun Is sinking down in its tranquillity ; The gentleness of heaven...
Página 292 - THE poetry of earth is never dead : When all the birds are faint with the hot sun, And hide in cooling trees, a voice will run From hedge to hedge about the new-mown mead ; That is the Grasshopper's...
Página 256 - Two Voices are there ; one is of the Sea, One of the Mountains ; each a mighty Voice : In both from age to age Thou didst rejoice, They were thy chosen Music, Liberty...
Página lviii - Past reason hated, as a swallow'd bait, On purpose laid to make the taker mad: Mad in pursuit, and in possession so; Had, having, and in quest to have, extreme; A bliss in proof, — and prov'd, a very woe; Before, a joy propos'd; behind, a dream.
Página 34 - To fetters, and the damp vault's dayless gloom, Their country conquers with their martyrdom, And Freedom's fame finds wings on every wind.
Página 260 - Sleepless ! and soon the small birds' melodies Must hear, first uttered from my orchard trees ; And the first cuckoo's melancholy cry. Even thus last night, and two nights more, I lay, And could not win thee, Sleep ! by any stealth : So do not let me wear...

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