Railway Economy: An Exposition of the Advantages of Locomotion by Locomotive Carriages Instead of the Present Expensive System of Steam Tugs

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Sutherland & Knox, 1849 - 67 páginas

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Página 58 - He was one Of many thousand such that die betimes, Whose story is a fragment, known to few. Then comes the man who has the luck to live, And he's a prodigy. Compute the chances, And deem there's ne'er a one in dangerous times Who wins the race of glory, but than him A thousand men more gloriously endowed Have fallen upon the course ; a thousand others Have had their fortunes...
Página 32 - ... the cost of moving trains by locomotive engines increases rapidly with the speed. Now when it is considered that we surrender to great monopolies the regulation of all the arteries of communication throughout the kingdom, that it depends in a great measure upon their view of their interest when we shall travel, at what speed we shall travel, and what we shall pay, it becomes a material consideration, in balancing the advantages insured to the public by rival systems, to estimate not so much what...
Página 4 - Economy," similar views to those which I have advanced. In page 4, he says : " The existing railway machinery will be found to be monstrously disproportionate to the useful effect produced in four-fifths of the number of times that the machine is put in action. And to this waste of power may be most justly attributed much of the present embarrassment of railway companies.
Página 26 - ... in fact, the power of the engine, supposing the power to be absorbed, may be taken to be directly as the area of the fire-grate or the quantity of fuel contained in the fire-box.
Página 32 - ... may be. This is, no doubt, a serious objection to the economy of the atmospheric system under the circumstances above alluded to. But, on the other hand, as the expenses do not increase in proportion to the frequency of the trains, it is to the interest of Companies adopting the atmospheric principle to increase the amount of their traffic by running frequent light trains, at low rates of fare; by which the convenience of the public must be greatly promoted. Upon an Atmospheric Railway the moving...
Página 24 - Again in another passage he wrote : — "These figures indicate the small portion of the mechanism of 'the railway system of transport that is actually brought into requisition, even on the most frequented lines. Thousands, nay, millions of miles are run by locomotives and carriages on the present system, while they are performing an amount of transport of passengers preposterously disproportioned to the power and capacity of the trains employed for effecting it.
Página 65 - ... atmosphere to the pistons; it will not require more than three or four pounds to overcome the friction of the engine and tender proper, but it requires 15 pounds in addition to that to overcome the engine and tender, taking into account the atmospheric resistance to the piston ; so that there is always 15 pounds of pressure of steam in all high-pressure engines absolutely lost ; it is not the friction of the engine ; certainly it is a defect in the engine from its being a high-pressure engine,...
Página 43 - ... great increase not only in the weight but in the speed of the Engines." " I would here remark, that when competition was developing the present high velocities upon Railways generally, Mr. Robert Stephenson gave it in evidence as his opinion that the limit would be found, not in any particular guage or in the evaporating power of the engines, but in the economic endurance of the Permanent Way to bear the additional weight which must, as a matter of necessity, accompany every increase of speed....
Página 44 - ... consider that they have as yet reached the limit of their scale. " The rapid deterioration of the Permanent Way, however, about which there can be no doubt, raises the question, whether the speeds already attained, have not approached the economic limit to which Mr. Robert Stephenson refers. If this be the case, Railway Companies must look to a considerably increased outlay in the shape of renewals of Permanent Way; it may be financially disguised for a time, but sooner or later, it must be met...
Página 64 - ... the consumption of fuel to overcome a load of 15 carriages at 30 miles an hour; that is, it took as much to move the engine and tender as it did additional to move 15 carriages. There have been many reasonings upon that without considering the precise application of it. A large proportion of the fuel in moving the engine alone is consumed in overcoming the resistance of the atmosphere to the pistons ; it will not require more than three or four pounds to overcome the friction of the engine and...

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