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THE

N A T U R A L I S T,

CONTAINING TREATISES ON

NATURAL HISTORY, CHEMISTRY, DOMESTIC AND RURAL

ECONOMY, MANUFACTURES AND ARTS.

WITH

TWELVE ILLUSTRATIONS.

EDITED BY D. J. BROWNE.

- Plants, trees and stones we note;
Birds, insecis, beasts and rural things!

VOL. I.

.

BOSTON,

PEIRCE AND PARKER, AND CARTER AND HENDEE.

M DCCC XXXI.

LIBRARY
UNIVERSITY O, CALIFORNIA

DAVIS

Corrections to be made with a pen.

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Page 1, line 2, for Dec. 1830, read Jan. 1831.

8, 13, for suitures read sutures.

“ 18, for Isabelella read Isabella.

“ 11, for augustifolia read angustifolia. “ 56, erase the note at the bottom of the page.

“ 58, line 5, for sanscript read sanscrit. On page 261 and 263, in speaking of the strength and speed of wild horses, there is a direct contradiction of sentiment. We have authority for both, but the latter we think correct.

Directions for the Binder.

The plate illustrating the human hair to front page 204; and that illustrating the external parts of the horse, page 272. All the others to front the first page of the pumber to which they are prefixed.

Lyceum Press....Light and Harris, Boston.

PREFACE.

The science of Natural History is eminently important to the civilized world, and ought to be duly appreciated and thoroughly understood. The study and pursuit of its various branches are fraught with instruction to man, evincing the subserviency of the products of nature to his will and industry. Of the benefits of this science in the improvement of many arts, no one doubts. Our food, our medicine, our luxuries are improved by it. Tbere is not a department of human inquiry or labor, either for health, pleasure, ornament or profit, but is indebted to this science for support. It is an interosting and laudable source of enjoyment, by which the mind is expanded, and the heart warmed and animated with the glowing spirit of devotion. He who surveys the vast field of nature, and devotes a portion of bis time to the study of the principles which influence or gover the motions of animated beings, however minute they may be, will not only derive pleasure from the pursuit, but will gain the only means of discovering the object and utility of their creation.

There are works on this science, written by Linnæus, Buffon, Goldsmith, and others, wbich have for a long time been well established in public favor-written nearly a century ago ; but however learned and elegant they were considered at that day, they are now found to be incorrect in many respects. By the indefatigable industry and research of men, who have formed themselves into associations in various parts of the civilized world, for the promotion and diffusion of natural science, many discoveries and improvements have been made, which are now interspersed among many modern works. Besides, the works before named are not in the hands of general readers, and cannot be obtained without considerable expense.

From the above considerations, it is the object of the editor of this work, to select the most useful and interesting topics of Natural History, to express them in plain and intelligible language, at a price which can be afforded by those of the most limited income, and to illustrate them by appropriate delineations.

He is sensible that the task he has undertaken is a laborious and responsible one; and while he is desirous of devoting bis unwearied exertions towards perfecting the object in view, he must at the same time crave from the public the extension of their kind indulgence towards its imperfections, premising that any errors into which he may be inadvertantly led will be cheerfully corrected when apprised of their existence; and he will gratefully receive any suggestions with respect to improvements, particularly from those who have devoted themselves to the study of natural science.

THE EDITOR.

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