History of the United States of America: From the Discovery of the Continent [to 1789], Volumen6

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The first American scholar to actually work with Goethe, brought back enlightenment themes from the German, and antedated and contributed to the flowering of Transcendentalism. Appeals to free markets ... Leer comentario completo

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Contenido

Peace between America and Great Britain
37
Ministry of Fox and the duke of Portland The king against the ministry
45
Long debates upon
47
Believes American union impossible
60
The king of England invites a cordial understanding with France
62
Fox and reform The new colonial system of Great Britain
68
THE AMERICAN ARMY AND ITS CHIEF
70
Washingtons meditations His appeal to the governor of Virginia
77
Sweden Prussia
79
flow his plan was received
82
DISBANDING THE ARMY
83
The constitution in the Delaware legislature
84
IN FIVE BOOKS
87
CHAPTER III
89
History of the clause against slavery
118
Jefferson enforces union
123
THE CONFEDERATION
127
CHAPTER IV
136
CHAPTER 1
154
State of religion in the colonies
156
ON THE WAY TO A FEDERAL CONVENTION 17881787
160
CHAPTER I
167
State laws cannot shield the traitor
172
The states and the nation Independence declared unitedly
175
CHAPTER VII
177
Washington embarrassed for income A gradual abolitionist
185
VIRGINIA INVITES DEPUTIES OF THE SEVERAL LEGISLATURES OF THE STATES
195
Its legislature accepts the invitation from Annapolis
201
CHAPTER I
207
Limited power of the delegates from Delaware
211
Extent of the federal legislative powers
217
The veto power
223
The requirement of an oath
229
Character of Roger Sherman
231
Of Johnson Of Ellsworth
241
Franklin proposes prayer
247
269
249
The convention equally divided
253
Virginia accepts the ordinance with its exclusion of slavery
258
Appointment of a committee of one from each state
260
CHAPTER V
270
Anxiety of the country
276
Rufus Putnams plan for colonizing the West His appeal to Washington
282
9
356
Of a university No state to trespass on the rights of another state
357
Slavery not recognized as a legal condition
363
THE PEOPLE OF THE STATES IN JUDGMENT ON TIE CONSTITU
371
10
377
CHAPTER III
393
CHAPTER XI
409
Debate between Lowndes and Pinckney
416
Power left to the states to interfere with contracts
418
His station and character
419
89
426
Failure of the negotiation Washington
427
Madison compares the British and American constitutions
433
THE CONSTITUTION
441
In Maryland In congress Riot in Philadelphia
453
The committee report its approval of the constitution
461
Contest between the North and the South
478
Debate on the extent of the powers of the convention
479
But not to interfere ex post facto The term ex post facto defined
480
467
483
The universal love of union Intercitizenship
484
233
489
Excessive importations of British goods The consequent distress
491
Power of the congress to encourage manufactures by impost duties 307
492
The army at Newburg Its appeal to congress
497
Power confined to the United States
498
Slaves and representation
507
Ellsworth on pational existence
516
408
518
The constitution referred to a state convention
520
Congress votes Washington a statue It receives him publicly
522
Clause on contracts
527
The officers of the army bid farewell to Washington
528
Relation of reeligibility of the executive to the length of the period of office 330
531
Grayson and slavery Nathan Dane and King
535
The choice of the president by the vote of the states negatived
543
Progress of the world by mastery over the forces of nature
544
The assumption of the state debts Jurisdiction over crimes
550
114
552
His report
562
Independence and a continental convention and charter
563
Pennsylvania
570
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Página 292 - We, the people of the States of New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, do ordain, declare and establish, the following Constitution for the government of ourselves, and our posterity : ARTICLE I.
Página 218 - Confederation, and moreover to legislate in all cases to which the separate States are incompetent, or in which the harmony of the United States may be interrupted by the exercise of individual legislation ; to negative all laws passed by the several States contravening, in the opinion of the National Legislature, the Articles of Union, or any treaty subsisting under the authority of the Union...
Página 148 - I have done nothing in the late Contest, but what I thought myself indispensably bound to do, by the Duty which I owed to my People. I will be very frank with you. I was the last to consent to the Separation, but the Separation having been made and having become inevitable, I have always said, as I say now, that I would be the first to meet the Friendship of the United States as an independent Power.
Página 390 - Under the Articles of Confederation each State retained its sovereignty, freedom and independence, and every power, jurisdiction and right not expressly delegated to the United States.
Página 374 - That the said report, with the resolutions and letter accompanying the same, be transmitted to the several legislatures, in order to be submitted to a convention of delegates, chosen in each State by the people thereof, in conformity to the resolves of the convention made and provided in that case.
Página 196 - States, to devise such further provisions as shall appear to them necessary to render the constitution of the federal government adequate to the exigencies of the union...
Página 321 - I congratulate you, fellow-citizens, on the approach of the period at which you may interpose your authority constitutionally, to withdraw the citizens of the United States from all further participation in those violations of human rights which have been so long continued on the unoffending inhabitants of Africa, and which the morality, the reputation, and the best interests of our country, have long been eager to proscribe.
Página 371 - Constitution which we now present, is the result of a spirit of amity and of that mutual deference and concession which the peculiarity of our political situation rendered indispensable.
Página 256 - He thought the rule of representation ought to be so fixed, as to secure to the Atlantic States a prevalence in the national councils.
Página 105 - And although the general has so frequently given it as his opinion in the most public and explicit manner that, unless the principles of the federal government were properly supported, and the powers of the Union increased, the honor, dignity and justice of the nation would be lost forever...

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