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A TABLE TO FIND EASTER DAY,

From the Year 1900, to the year 2199, inclusive. Golden No.(Day of Mo.Sun. Letter.

14 March 22

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AUGMUA U SUAU COACMODO LUCU

The Golden Numbers in the foregoing Calendar will point out the Days of the Paschal full Moons, till the year of our Lord 1900; (1.) at which Time, in order that the Ecclesiastical Full Moons may fall nearly on the same Days with the real Full Moons, the Golden Numbers must be removed to different Days of the Calendar, as is done in the annexed Table, which contains so much of the Calendar then to be used, as is necessary for finding the Paschal full Moons, and the Feast of Easter, from the Year 1900, to the Year 2199, inclusive. This Table is to be made use of, in all respects, as the First Table, before inserted, for finding Easter till the Year 1899.

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(1.) In the English Book, there is a note underneath the months of March and April, in the Calendar, intended to show the use of the golden numbers, in a column attached to these inonths only. It is as follows. “ The numbers here prefixed to the several days, between the 21st day of March, and the 18th day of April, both inclusive, denote the days upon which those full moons do fall, which happen upon or next after the 21st day of March, in those years, of which they are respectively the golden numbers : and the Sunday letter next following any such full moon points out Easter Day for that year. All which holds until the year of our Lord 1899 inclusive; after which year, the place of these golden numbers will be to be changed, as is hereafter expressed."

“On investigating this subject,” says Bishop White, " we found that the note was wanting in the prayer books edited before the adoption of the Gregorian style in 1751, but was found in all the succeeding editions consulted. From these circumstances it seems probable, that in making out the calendar for the American church, there was taken a book prior to the said date. The column, with the golden numbers, may have been called for at the crisis of the change of style; but, as it is insufficient for the finding of Easter, from its not showing how the golden numbers are to be found ; and as this, with the whole process for the finding of the festival, is provided for by a table appropriated to that object ; it was thought proper to omit the column and the figures included in it.” T. C. B.

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THE ORDER FOR DAILY
MORNING PRAYER.(1.)

The MINISTER shall begin the MORNING PRAYER, by reading one or more of the

following Sentences of Scripture. (2.)

THE Lord is in his holy temple; let all the earth keep silence before him. Hab. ii. 20.

From the rising of the sun even unto the go

ing down of the same, my name shall be great
among the Gentiles; and in every place in-
cense shall be offered unto my name, and a

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(1.) Under the Law, daily morning and evening And we find that this was a common period of devotions were enjoined by God, on all the Israel christian worship, in the time of St. Cyprian, and ites.—“Thou shalt offer upon the altar two lambs Clement of Alexandria. It was not long after, that of the first year day by day continually; the one the Monks, who professed to be more devout than lamb thou shalt offer in the morning, and the other other Christians, added other hours of stated prayer. lamb thou shalt offer at even.” This ordinance was These stated periods of daily devotion had increasconstantly observed by the Jews, during the con ed to seven, in the time of Pope Pelagius the Setinuance of their city and polity. It was probably cond, who established them by a decree, and proon this account that the primitive christians set vided offices of devotion for the several “ Canoniapart these periods as times for solemn worship. cal hours."— At the period of the Reformation, our And like all the divine ordinances their institution parent Church of England brought back the periods is most consonant to reason, and the fitness of of public worship to the primitive usage, and enthings. Every morning when we awake, we re joined only “daily morning and evening prayer." ceive, as it were anew, our life from God.- When But though the Church has appointed these two We arise from our beds, to go forth amidst the cares periods of public worship, she does not thereby exand temptations of the world, and the dangers and cuse any of her children from the essential duty of business of the day, nothing can be more reasona private devotion. Stated periods for retirement to ble than that we should offer to our merciful Pre the closet are salutary for all men. We may worserver our thanksgivings for his care over us during ship God, indeed, at any period of the day, and in the unguarded monents of sleep, and for all the the midst of our business, by short mental ejaculablessings he is constantly conferring on us; and tions, but the use of stated times for private devothat we should supplicate his guidance and protec tiou cannot be too highly estimated. Such is the tion through the day, as well as his favour and bless constitution of our nature, that a duty, which wethink ing on the work of our hands.- In the evening, can be performed at any time, we are api to defer altoo, the same reasons call us to a renewal of the together, unless we regulate our conduct by fixed rules. same dulies of devotion. Retiring from the labours In the Cathedral Churches, in England, the reguand vanities of the day, and when our exhausted lar morning service is constantly performed. But spirits dispose us to sink down upon our beds, in the circumstances of country parishes will not adthe attitude and image of death, reason requires of | mit of this daily public worship; nor is it practicaus, tbat as dying men, we should supplicate the par | ble in the Parish Churches of this country. But don of God for our omissions of duty, as well as for though the dispersed residences, and the secular our follies and positive transgressions; and that we avocations of Christians, will not permit them to should again commend ourselves to His protection | assemble daily for public worship, pone can be exwho never slumbers nor sleeps.

cused for the neglect of Family Devotions. And But besides the public devotions of the morning the American branch of the Church, has set forth and evening, many of the devout Jews were in the | “Forms of Prayer to be used in Families,” well habit of retiring to their closets, in the middle of suited to their circumstances and their wants.the day for the purpose of private worship. And Those heads of Families, therefore, who live in the we have reason to believe that this custom was habitual neglect of these daily morning and evening adopted by the early Christians. We learn that St. devotions, frustrate the benevolent intentions of the Peter, “ went upon the housetop to pray, about the Church, and lose one of the most interesting bands sixth hour," which corresponds with our noon. / of the domestic state : while they are deficient in a

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