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Mr. Rousseau was ever more in bis senses than he is at present. The former brilliancy of his genius, and his great talents for writing, are no proof of the contrary. It is an old remask, that great wits are near allied to madness; and even in those francic letters which he has wrote to me, there are evidently strong traces of his wonted genius and eloquence. He has frequently told me, that he was composing his memoirs, in which justice should be done to his own character, to that of his friends, and to that of his enemies; and as Mr. Davenport informs me that fince his retreat into the country, he has been much employed in writing, I have reason to conclude that he is at present finishing that undertaking. No:hing could be more unexpected to me than my passing so suddenly from the class of his friends to that of his enemies; but this transition being made, I suft expect to be treated accordingly; and I own that this reflection gave me some anxiety. A work of this nature, both from the celebrity of the person, and the str. kes of eloquence interspersed, would certainly attract the attention of the world; and it might be published either after my death, or after that of the author. In the former case, there would be no body who could tell the story, or justify my memory. In the latter, my apology, wrote in opposition to a dead person, would lose a great deal of its authenticity. For this reason, I have at present collected the whole story into one Narrative, that I may few it to my friends, and at any time have it in my power to inake whatever use of it they and I should think proper. I am, and always have been, such a lover of peace, that nothing but neceflity, or very forcible reasons, could have obliged me to give it to the public,

Pirdidi beneficium. Numquid quæ consecravimus perdidise nos dicimus? Inter consecrata beneficium eft; etiamsi male respondit, benè collocatum. Non eft ille qualem speravimus ; fimus nos quales fuimus, ei dissimiles.

Seneca de beneficiis, lib. vii. cap. 19.' MONTHLY CATALOGUE,

For NOVEMBER, 1766.

RELIGIOUS and CONTROVERSIAL. Art. 11. A Reply to the Letter to the Rev. Mr. Caleb Evans ; occalorici boy his Two Sirmons on the Deity of the Son and Holy Spi

8vo. 8d. Buckland. DIRI' ave some judicious animadversions in this Reply, and many

which we apprehend will contribute very liude towards a right eluidation of the lubject in dispute between this orthocox genileman, and mix herredux opponent, the le:ter-wriier.–Our unknown Author, tuometer, will certainly duine from the judgment of the Monthly Reviewers, on this occafion, as he seems to have entertained a very indifferent open of i', * well as of their im; artiality ; from their baving

inmad-dirnis Willians's Alrimpt, which he disapproves :-thus W Siche basice. That was EXCELLENTLY observed, 'fays I, when I

read

sead a passage in an author, u here his opirion agrees with mine : when we differ, I pronounce him to be a blockhead.

POLITICA L. Art. 12. Short Considerations upon some late extraordinary Grants,

and other Particulars of a late Patriot's Conduct. 8vo. IS. Almon.

We find nothing in these considerations but what has been a thousand times repeated, riz. that Lord Chm and Lord Cmden ill supe port the character of patriots ; that it is impossible, either for the crown, or the people, to sublilt long, under their unlimited gratifications; that they are beggaring their sovereign for their own purposes, and rioting in the vitals of their country, at a time when all orders of men are diftrolled, from the highest to the lowest. The Author closes his Core federations with a short address to the late great commoner, and concludes with the following passage:

• But I will reserve the defcription of your fluctuating opinions of men, and time-serving couruhip of individuals, for another occasion; my intent being, at present, only to lay impartially before the public, the dawnings of your new accession to office, that from your economy, moderation, and disinterestednols, they may judge what the crown and the people are to expect from you, when you shall open the session of parliament in the plenitude of your power.' Art. 13. An Address to the People of England: foewing the Advan

tages arising from the frequent Changes of Ministers: With an Address to the next Administration, 8vo. Is. 6d. Almon.

The short duration of our late inch-of-candle adminiftrations, as they are here humouroully filed, have afforded our author a subject for the exercise of an ingenious, ironical pen ; by the dextrous use of which he attempts to prove, how preferable temporary short administrations are to tedious and settled ones, and that the former are infinitely more be. neficial to the nation, than the latter. He aims many sarcastical strokes at the great Patriot; and in his address to the next administration, says a number of droll things on a very serious subject, -the present scarcity of provisions, and consequent miseries of the poor. Art. 14. A Letter to a Noble Lord, concerning the Complaints and

Necessities of the Poor. By a Country Gentleman. 8vo. 6d. Bladon.

The noble lord here addressed, is the Earl of Chatham ; who is loudly called upon to exert his admirable talents, for the relief of his indigent miserable countrymen; and to endeavour, by wholesome comprehensive laws, not only to alleviate their present dittress, but to avert the heavier evils with which the increase of tillage and decrease of pasturage threaten them and their .poiterity. It is a sensible little tradt. Art. 15. A true History of a late fhort Aảministration. 8vo. 60.

Almon, This is a shrewd parody on ' a fhort account of a late short admi. nistration, of which we gave an extract in our Revie:v for August, p. 160. To which this Mr.- Tother side hath added, a view of some Other weafures which he says the modesty of the author of the stort aicount hath induced him to over-look. From this view, the parodist, draws, on the whole, the following conclusion: ! That the nation,

Mr. Rousseau was ever more in bis senses than he is at present. The former brilliancy of his genius, and his great talents for writing, are no proof of the contrary. It is an old remark, that great wits are near allied to madness; and even in those francic letters which he has wrote to me, there are evidently frong traces of his wonted genius and eloquence. He has frequently told me, that he was composing his memoirs, in which justice should be done to his own character, to that of his friends, and to that of his enemies; and as Mr. Davenport informs me that since his retreat into the country, he has been much employed in writing, I have reason to conclude that he is at present finishing that undertaking. No:hing could be more unexpected to me than my palling so suddenly from the class of his friends to that of his enemies; but this transition being made, I iuft expect to be treated accordingly; and I own that this reflection gave me some anxiety. A work of this nature, both from the celebrity of the person, and the str.

, kes of eloquence interspersed, would certainly attract the attention of the world; and it might be published either after my death, or after that of the author. In the former case, there would be no body who could tell the story, or juitify my memory. In the latter, my apology, wrote in opposition to a dead person, would lose a great deal of its authenticity. For this reason, I have at present collected the whole story into one Narrative, that I may shew it to my friends, and at any time have it in my power to make whatever use of it they and I should think proper. I am, and always have been, such a lover of peace, that nothing but necesity, or very forcible reasons, could have obliged me to give it to the public,

· Perdidi beneficium. Nunquid quæ confecravimus perdidisse nos dicimus? Inter confecrata beneficium eft; ctiamsi male respondit, benè collocatum. Non eft ille qualem speravimus ; fimus nos quales fuimus, ei dissimiles.

· Seneca de beneficiis, lib. vii. cap. 19.' MONTHLY CATALOGUE,

For NOVEMBER, 1766.

RELIGIOUS and CONTROVERSIAL. Art. 11. A Reply to the Letter to the Rev. Mr. Caleb Evans ; cc

cafioned by his Two Sermons on the Deity of the Son and Holy Spirit. 8vo. 8d, Buckland.

HERE are some judicious animadversions in this Reply, and many

which we apprehend will contribure very litle towards a right clucidation of the fubje&t in dispute between this miho ox genileman, and bis heterodox opponent, the leiter-uriier.--Our unknown Author, however, will certainly dilli nt from the judgment of the Monthly Reviewers, on this occafion, as he seems to have entertained a very indifferent opinion of i, as well as of their im artiality; from their having commended George Willianis's Alicmpt, which he disapproves :-thus as Swift has it, “That was EXCELLENTLY observed, says I, when I

read

sead a passage in an author, where his opirion agrees with mine : when we differ, I pronounce him to be a blockhead.

POLITIC A L. Art. 12. Short Considerations upon some late extraordinary Grants,

and other Particulars of a late Patriot's Conduct. 8vo. IŞ. Almon.

We find nothing in these confiderations but what has been a thousand times repeated, viz. that Lord Chm and Lord C-den ill fupport the character of patriars ; that it is impossible, either for the crown, or the people, to sublift long, under their unlimited gratifications; that they are beggaring their sovereign for their own purposes, and rioting in the vitals of their country, at a time when all orders of men are diftrefled, from the highest to the lowest. The Author closes his Cone fiderations with a short address to the late great commoner, and concludes with the following passage :

• But I will reserve the delcription of your fluctuating opinions of men, and time-serving courtihip of individuals, for another occasion; my intent being, at present, only to lay impartially before the public, the dawnings of your new accefsion to office, that from your æconomy, înıderation, and disinterestedness, they may judge what the crown and the people are to expect from you, when you fall open the session of parliament in the plenitude of your power.' Art. 13. An Address to the People of England: Shewing the Advan

tages arising from the frequent Changes of Ministers: With an Address to the next Adminitration, 8vo. Is. 6d. Almon.

The hort duration of our late inch-of-candle administrations, as they are here humourously filed, have afforded our author a fubje&t for the exercise of an ingenious, ironical pen: by the dextrous use of which he attempts to prove, how preferable temporary short adminiftrations are to tedious and settled ones, and that the former are infinitely more beneficial to the nation, than the latter. He aims many sarcastical strokes at the great Patriot; and in his address to the next administration, says a number of droll things on a very serious subject, -the present scarcity of provisions, and consequent miseries of the poor. Art. 14. A Letter to a Noble Lord, concerning the Complaints and

Necefilies of the Poor. By a Country Gentleman. 8vo. 6d. Bladon.

The noble lord here addressed, is the Earl of Chatham ; who is loudly called upon to exerı his admirable talents, for the relief of his indigent miserable countrymen; and to endeavour, by wholesome comprehensive laws, not only to alleviate their present distress, but to avere the heavier evils with which the increase of tillage and decrease of palturage threaten them and their .pofterity. It is a sensible little tra&t. Art. 15. A true History of a late foort Administration. 8vo.

8vo. 6d. Almon. This is a shrewd parody on 'a fhort' account of a late short admin nistration,' of which we gave an extract in our Revie:v for August, p. 160. To which this Mr.- Tother side hath added, a view of iome Osher measures which he says the modefty of the author of the short account hath induced him tò over.look. From this view, the parodilt, draws, on the whole, the following conclusion: That the nation,

which in the preceding two years, had been benefited (by the preceding administration] 200,000 l. per annum, was impoverished by the last administration *, in the space of one year, 240,000 l. which is the interest of eight milions!' He adds, The public, which had beheld them advanced to office with surprize, fel: a warm indignation at the oppressions which it had suffered from their measures, and saw, with the juftest pleasure, a part of them, at least, deprived of the power of augmenting the distrelies of the state.' He finally concludes, That • the nation has too severely felt the effects of their incapacity and profufion, either to with for or to support, fucceffors of similar principles and abilities.'— It is not our business to enter into the merits of this minilterial controversy ; but we cannot help observing, that the objections brought by the author of this true history, seem to be urged with more fpirit, than regard to candor and moderation. In particular, what he says concerning the repeals of the cyder and American stamp-bills, is expreffed with fo much party-virulence, as plainly thews his defign to run down the gentlemen of the short adminifti a'ion, at all cvents, righi or wrong. To be sure, where a writer engages in the service of any party, there is nothing like going through ftitch with his work! If, says he, in a parenthesis, we add their increase of

expences to their diminution of the income.' Art. 16. Observations on Affairs in Ireland, from the Settlement in

1691, to the present Time. By Nicholas Lord Viscount Taafe, 8vo. is, 6d. Griffin..

Another Edition of the same Tract. 8vo. 63. Cavell. This is a curious account of the present state of the Roman-Catholic interest in Ireland, and is very speciously drawn up by the noble writer, who is of that persuasion, and a fufferer for it: as being there by deprived of those national honours and advantages which he might have enjoyed as an Irish peer, had he not been disqualified by his religion.That the Roman-Catholics of Ireland should complain of the political hardships and restraints under which they have been laid, is extremely natural; and if we could, zuith safety to ourselves, afford them the relief which they have, of lace, so earnestly solicited, no candid Proteltant would, we are perfuaded, hesitate a moment, to grant them all that they can reasonably alk. But every intelligent Protestant will be very cautious in listening to the artful representations of these natural enemies to our inestimable liberties, both civil and religious. Do we not know what manner of spirit the Roman Catholics of all countries are possessed of ? Do we not know that it is an intolerant and a perfecuting spirit? And is such a spirit to be trusted ? In Ireland, it is at present happily subdued, and put under an effetual restraint; and would it not be madness in us to unrivet the shakels with which our forefathers, prompted by aear-bought experience, have wisely confined it ?-We readily allow that many of the grievances complained of, on the part of the Trilh Roman-Catholics, are indeed grievous to them, and a very heavy burthen ; but they nay thank themselves for all those sufferings which are here fo pathetically enumerated ; and which, after all, if thoroughly examined into, will not, we apprehend, appear altogether to unreasonable or impolitic, on the part of our government, as, to a fuperficial enquirer, may at first sight appear. In fine, we think Lord Taafe's pamphlet may be fully answered, perhaps in every particular, and we hope it will be fairly answered by some able hand, to the en

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