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been made, and, indeed, would not have been necessary.

Donations will be thankfully received and acknowledged by the Rev. H. Toller, Mr. Heygate, or Mr. Nunneley, Market Har. borough.

ness in the evening. Chair to be taken at half-past six o'clock.

The annual meeting of the Kent Union Society, for the relief of aged and infirm ministers, and widows and orphans of de. ceased ministers, will be held on Tuesday afternoon at four o'clock.

KENT ASSOCIATION. The fifty-first annual meeting of the Kent Congregational Association, will (D.v.) be held at Sheerness, on Tuesday and Wednesday, July 4th and 5th. Preachers, the Rev. Messrs. Poster, of Westerham, and Verrall, of Bromley. There will be an open committee of ministers and delegates on Wed. nesday afternoon, and the meeting for busi

REMOVAL The Rev. R. Robinson, of Chatteris, has removed to Luton, Beds, having accepted a cordial invitation to succeed the Rev. J. Bright, (now of Woolwich,) and has entered on his stated labours with encouraging prospects of usefulness.

General Chronicle.

WEST INDIES.

roof I was to take up my abode and meet the

brethren, resides at "Mount Providence," A WEEK AT CHAPELTON, IN JAMAICA. an elevated spot, commanding an extensive

MR. EDITOR,—I have thought that a prospect, distant rather more than two miles brief sketch of a week which I passed at the from Chapelton. On his premises a valuable above station, in company with all the mis. school for young children is sustained by the sionaries of the London Missionary Society, benevolence of some private friends; a proat the close of my late tour in the west, mising man of colour is the teacher. Mount might not be unacceptable to your numerous Providence is a location of much interest. readers, nor, I hope, altogether unprofitable. A considerable number of negroes (now, It afforded me the opportunity of enjoying more properly called the peasantry, or laintercourse with “ brethren dwelling toge- bouring population,) were desirous of obtainther in unity," and of observing within so ing allotments of land on which they might brief a space numerous incidents of an in- build their cottages, cultivate their gardens, structive and encouraging character, both as and breathe their freedom. An unwillingto the improving condition of the people ness existed among some of the proprietors generally, and the gratifying aspect of some to dispose of land for that purpose, partly of the churches of Jamaica in particular. from the desire to retain them on the estates

After passing a very delightful Sunday in in the “Negro walks,” in the cottages althe congregation at Four Paths, and its lotted to them during slavery, where their out-station, Brixton Hill, under the active services might be always within reach, and pastoral oversight of the Rev. W. G. Bar.

partly from an ungenerous suspicion, that if rett, witnessing the energy, affection, and settled on allotments of their own, where liberality of that people, the hopeful state of they would rear produce for their families, their growing intelligence, and the pleasing they would be too idle to work on estates. indications of their piety, I set off on the Under these circumstances, the missionary Monday, 6th March, for Chapelton, in the purchased a large piece of unoccupied land, parish of Clarendon. Some portions of the divided it into small and convenient shares, road led amidst rich and beautiful scenery, which were taken by an industrious and and presented to view, within a small dis. sober class of people, and this now constitance, some of the magnificent mountain tutes one of the free and flourishing setscenery of this splendid island. It was im. tlements of Jamaica. Happily, many of possible to pass without vivid enjoyment these are springing up (as they are also in among the rich and varied vegetation of the British Guiana,) where may be seen a cheerlandscape, where abounded the sugar-cane ful and active population, the little ones as and bamboo, sweet and bitter orange, limes, free and as merry as those in Old England, acacias, mangoes, pimentos, mahogany, and and though perhaps less clothed, are better logwood, with every now and then the fan- fed, than thousands in the mother country. tastic cactus arresting notice by the road As there are not less than thirty estates in side, and the beautiful “ Pride of Barbadoes"" the neighbourhood, the people can easily ob. riveting the attention of the traveller. tain employment.

The missionary under whose hospitable On tħe Tuesday morning we all felt the VOL. XXI.

2 G

slight shock of an earthquake at half-past three. I accompanied Mr. Jones to Salem chapel, Chapelton, for so they have desig. nated their new place of worship, and long may they realize all the “peace its name imports. It is a good, plain, substantial, stone building, capable of accommodating, without galleries, six hundred people. The walls, though not marble, are yet limestone found in the immediate neighbourhood, and though not fit to bear comparison with Solomon's Temple, it is yet " lined with cedar;". for this is the cheap and durable wood furnished most readily for pews, &c., on the spot. The interior of the chapel is not yet finished. The outlay has been already great, and the more so from the “unprincipled failure" of a house in Jamaica, where monies had been deposited that had been advanced towards the building. Hence the “finishing' of the interior is postponed till further means are forthcoming. Pulpit there is not, but the ingenuity of the missionary provides, as a substitute, a platform, on which a seraphine and music-stand are placed. Fond of music himself, he leads the singing of the people by the seraphine ; and that part of the service being closed, the instrument is shut up, the music-stand supplied with the Bible, and the arrangement is complete.

There is an excellent school-room under the chapel, superintended by a very intelligent and valuable agent of the society, Mr. James Milne, brother to Mr. Wm. Milne at Four Paths, both from a good missionary quarter, Huntley.

The London Missionary Society has eleven missionaries in Jamaica. It was pleasant to find, that without any serious inconveni. ence or difficulty, all could be accommodated under the roof at Mount Provi. dence. From Wednesday till Saturday, we were all engaged in mutual conversation and arrangements and prayer connected with the interests of the mission, reviewing the past, and digesting plans for the future. One feeling was predominant, that of humble thankfulness to God, who had crowned the Society's labours in the island with so many tokens of his favour. In less than nine years from the commencement of the mission, six thousand people were regularly brought under the means of grace, including seven hundred who have become members of the churches, and of the sincerity of whose piety, scarcely more doubt could be enter. tained than would be as to churches of equal numbers, by their pastors in England. Nearly eighteen hundred children are taught in the mission schools. Several good places of worship are already built, and others are in progress, adapted to the state of the people. The congregations are contributing liberally towards the support of their minis

ters, or the building of the chapels. When the latter are completed, there is little doubt of the competency of the people to pay their own experses by voluntary efforts." Yet so expensive is it for Europeans to reside in the West Indies, and so little capable are they of much walking, that the income of the resident missionaries or pastors must be liberal. Hence it is obvious that small congregations cannot sustain their own ministers. The resources would be too limited. Con. gregations must be large ; in this case, how. ever, they are spread over a large extent of country, and from this arises the difficulty of pastoral superintendence, and the necessity of well-qualified assistants. To this point, it is most obvious to me, that the missionaries of all denominations must direct their most serious attention.

On the Friday evening we had a public missionary meeting held in the chapel. It was well attended, and great interest was awakened ; the effects, it may be confidently hoped, will long continue. We drank tea in the large school-room under the chapel, quite reminding us of customs on similar occasions in our own land. It is cheering to see so much of what is useful and excellent in our home institutions, so rapidly trans. planted to colonial soil, and flourishing amidst a people who so lately were slaves, and so far from all such freedom and delight.

The following Sunday was a day of deep interest. After an early prayer-meeting, held in the school-room on the premises, we all proceeded from Mount Providence to Chapelton. Large schools were in attend.

Some of our number addressed them. Others of us attended the setting apart of seven deacons. The Rev. Mr. Vine and myself addressed them on the occasion, others of the brethren commended them to God in prayer. The congregation for the public service was largely attended ; it added much to the interest and solemnity of the occasion, that all our missionaries were present, and some of their families. I preached from Paul's language, “The love of Christ constraineth us," and afterwards administered the Lord's supper to the members of the church and my missionary brethren. It was a season long to be remembered. We all felt that God was in the midst of us, and confiding in his grace, we cherished the reso. lution to go forward in his service, rejoicing that we were permitted to behold sinners converted to the Saviour, and believers grox. ing in grace, and in the knowledge of Him that loved them, and gave himself for them.

It was evening by the time we reached home. Family worship was largely attended by many of the villagers residing in the neighbourhood. We retired to rest, and early the next morning were on our way to our respective destinations, my brethren to

ance.

resume their fields of labour ; and I, after whole human family, on the admission into passing a few more days in Kingston, to its brotherhood of a multitude, which is as proceed to England, which I have been per- the sand by the sea-shore, or as the stars in mitted to reach in safety, in answer to the the firmament, for number? May we not prayers of many, and grateful, hope, for congratulate the church of Christ on the the good I have seen, and the mercies with wide, the many openings now made for her which I have been crowned.

"good soldiers," to enter and occupy the I am, yours, most faithfully, empire in the name of the “ Prince of the

J. J. FREEMAN. kings of the earth?” May we not bless the Walthamstow, 29th May, 1843.

Mediator of the new covenant, who is crowned with the glory and honour, and sways the sceptre of love and mercy, that he has so far

overturned-overturned, and made a path JOURNAL OF THE REV. W. MILNE,

plain and smooth for the advance of His Missionary to China;

kingdom of righteousness and peace? “O SENT TO HIS BROTHER, THE REV. A. G. MILNE.

sing unto the Lord a new song, for he hath Tinghae, Oct. 1st, 1842. done marvellous things ; his right hand and On Sunday, Sept. 4th, official news was his holy arm hath gotten him the victory !" brought from head-quarters, by two steam- But, my brother, Protestant churches are ers, one bound for Hongkong, and the other not at present equal to meet the heavy refor Aden. I was not then able to write, for sponsibilities incurred by such a glorious I was labouring under diarrhea ; but I had event. The servants of the Romish church the inexpressible pleasure of receiving some are on the alert—the servants of mammon letters by them; one from Mr. Morrison, are awake—the men of the world will flock another from Mr. Tom, &c. The former " as doves to the windows" to China, and has been the fac-totum up at Nanking, and crowd the highways to wealth and honour; has been of essential service. All I cannot but how few are those who “ hold fast the now tell you; but he has been the most pro- form of sound words” received from the minent man in drawing up the treaty, (i. e. Lord and his apostles ! how small the numin Chinese,) and other papers, as he ought ber of those who are appointed to the serto be. Sir Henry makes him his right-hand vice of the glorious gospel ! and bow tri. man.

fling the prospect that others shall hasten After giving a hasty sketch of the treaty, out “ to the help of the Lord—the help of he adds :

the Lord against the mighty !" These are the principal points ; but Surely the intelligence carried to the land there are others, all of very great import- of our fathers by the present mail will rouse ance to the world, e.g., including the Ame- the adherents of the “ ancient city" to every rican and the French governments in the good word and work. treaty. The French commander, ship Eri. If missionary societies are failing for gone, then in the Yangtze. Kiang, signed want of support, can the rich and wealthy the treaty with Sir Henry. What a happy professors belonging to the churches with feature this! Surely it will unite the three hold their contributions ? Is there not in great nations more than ever.

this providential movement a call loud and I am sure, my dear brother, you will be strong-“Who then is willing to consedelighted with the accompanying syllabus of crate his service this day unto the Lord ?" the great treaty, the greatest that has been The churches have desired long, and prayed concluded for many ages, the most moment. much, that China might be opened, and ous event, perhaps, that has occurred since Protestants have entreated that it might be the birth of our Saviour! It is before the their honour, their privilege, to rear a holy discovery of America, for look at the ac- and a glorious temple in these vast domicess thus opened to the church of Christ to nions. Their prayer is heard, and the Lord so many myriads of people of such a cha- himself has prepared the materials for this racter. I have not time to dwell on the glorious superstructure. Everything is ready points in Sir Henry's circular ; but it is full on the part of the King himself, and He of matter for reflection, admiration, grati. now makes the appeal to those who profess tude.

allegiance and devotion to His service. And May we not then congratulate ourselves “who then is willing to consecrate his serthat we live in such times? May we not vice this day unto the Lord ?" To resist the congratulate England on the honour con- appeal will be disastrous. Or, if missionary ferred upon her of bringing about such an societies have their coffers well supplied, let issue? May we not congratulate the na- them not forget the interests of this immense tives of China on the benefits, vast and empire. Surely they cannot resist the voice varied, which are likely to accrue from the that now demands justice to the spiritual wise policy which their officers have at last wants of China. It is the voice of God. adopted ? May we not congratulate the Hitherto it cannot be questioned that China has been neglected. Her claims have not present crisis, for the advancement of been attended to; and now, to open the Christ's kingdom in this land of darkness ! eyes of missionary societies to their mis. My dear brother, use your influence with take, stations possessed of the higbest ad- your own charge to induce a right spirit at vantages are thrown open, while they have the present time, and turn this remarkable not a single missionary to spare for more event to some good account. If your own than one or two of them. Does not this heart be suitably impressed with its import. show, that if due foresight had been exer. ance, you will be more successful in arousing cised, we might now have bad at least two your people's minds; and if your church at liberty for each of the ports to be occu- move in a right spirit, you may carry other pied ? As it is, few of those who are in the churches in your neighbourhood along with field, or who may be given up to one or you, in the grand crusade about to open in other of the new openings, are as yet fit to this new and wide field. If you can write to enter with proper effect upon their duties. other ministers, do so without delay; and if

Again, if missionary societies are at length you think any remarks of mine may be of alive to a sense of their responsible relations service, use them as your judgment may to this empire, and if the churches of Christ dictate. Spare no means desirable or avail. have placed at their command those pecu- able at this juncture; and the peace of God niary means, which are necessary to carry rest upon you, my brother. out their sacred intentions, there are but By a line in the former part of this comfew to offer their personal services to the munication, you will learn that I have not work of evangelization, should not the pass. been very well. The attack was of short ing events stir up inquiry in the minds of duration, but left me weak for a few days. those who are entering on the sacred mi. However, within the last week I have renistry? Should they not search and see if vived under the cool refreshing temperature they ought not to devote themselves to the which is now crceping in from the north. evangelization of China ? The inquiry is I am thankful to feel myself advancing in solemn and delicate. It must rest with the colloquial of this place, and to find that every man, and must be conducted between I am gaining a hold of the affections and God and himself.

confidence of the people. May the God of My dear brother, I labour under peculiar all grace sanctify me, and make me a blessand oppressive feelings; but they are such ing to them. I have good opportunity for as, I have no doubt, you and every one distributing tracts, have daily service in my who look for the redemption of this people, own cottage open to all that please, and on and of the world, will sympathize in. Olet the Lord's day have a few who come to me. each of us retire to the spot, consecrated by I have daily opportunities of commending the presence of the Highest, and, shut up the grace that is in Christ Jesus to my frefrom the view of profane eyes, there humble quent visitors, and also to those I visit; and every man his own heart before God ! I am well received and listened to. I am Let us seek that this event of Divine Pro- looking out for orphan boys, the best nucleus vidence be sanctified to our hearts. Let for a theological academy; but I wait for us desire that it may revive pure religion in instructions from the directors respecting ourselves ; increase our longings after the our future movements. The winter is comdiffusion of it throughout the world ; and ing. I trust I shall have strength given me stimulate us to every effort for its promo- to improve it and myself, in acquiring the tion! Oh! while God is moving for us and colloquial more fully, and in communicating before us, shall we not follow Him ?-who the message of mercy to those around me. will sit still ?--who will be the sloth or the I am desirous of supplying every bouse in sluggard ?-who will look back? It cannot the city with a Testament or a tract, and of - it must not be. Our sun has arisep, and giving every one I can a statement orally or the morning-watchmen cry aloud, -"Arise, in writing of the gospel of Jesus Christ. I shine, for thy light is come, and the glory of told you in my last of having given up the the Lord is risen upon thee !" What a English service in the city; I have now blessing would surely rest on the opening of opened a Bethel in the harbour, and have China, if the announcement of this peace been greatly encouraged in my ministrations. lead the members of your church, and of all To-night I was called to witness a sad specchurches to private prayer, and personal tacle. It was that of a young officer near consecration to the service of the Redeemer ; his end ; alas ! I feel in doubt; and left the and if it should lead every church by itself, vessel in thoughtful suspense, most seriously and the churches of every department or deprecating that any of my relatives should every district, in union, to public thanks. die in such a state. Ho vful to prepare giving, humiliation, prayer, and resolution, for a meeting with God, when it is getting that they will do something special at the late!

(To be concluded in our next.)

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